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Author (up) Raap, T.; Pinxten, R.; Casasole, G.; Dehnhard, N.; Eens, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Ambient anthropogenic noise but not light is associated with the ecophysiology of free-living songbird nestlings Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages 2754  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Urbanization is associated with dramatic increases in noise and light pollution, which affect animal behaviour, physiology and fitness. However, few studies have examined these stressors simultaneously. Moreover, effects of urbanization during early-life may be detrimental but are largely unknown. In developing great tits (Parus major), a frequently-used model species, we determined important indicators of immunity and physiological condition: plasma haptoglobin (Hp) and nitric oxide (NOx) concentration. We also determined fledging mass, an indicator for current health and survival. Associations of ambient noise and light exposure with these indicators were studied. Anthropogenic noise, light and their interaction were unrelated to fledging mass. Nestlings exposed to more noise showed higher plasma levels of Hp but not of NOx. Light was unrelated to Hp and NOx and did not interact with the effect of noise on nestlings' physiology. Increasing levels of Hp are potentially energy demanding and trade-offs could occur with life-history traits, such as survival. Effects of light pollution on nestlings of a cavity-nesting species appear to be limited. Nonetheless, our results suggest that the urban environment, through noise exposure, may entail important physiological costs for developing organisms.  
  Address Department of Biology, Behavioural Ecology and Ecophysiology Group, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk, Belgium  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28584270; PMCID:PMC5459827 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2451  
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Author (up) Rodríguez, A.; Moffett, J.; Revoltós, A.; Wasiak, P.; McIntosh, R.R.; Sutherland, D.R.; Renwick, L.; Dann, P.; Chiaradia, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light pollution and seabird fledglings: Targeting efforts in rescue programs: Assessing Condition Of Rescued Seabirds Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The Journal of Wildlife Management Abbreviated Journal Jour. Wild. Mgmt.  
  Volume 81 Issue 4 Pages 734-741  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract One of the most critical phases in the life of petrels (Procellariiformes) is at fledging whenyoung birds pass from parental dependence on land to an independent life at sea. To mitigate mortality at thistime, rescue programs are implemented near breeding sites around the world, especially for birds grounded byartificial lights. We evaluated the plumage and body condition of short-tailed shearwater (Ardennatenuirostris) fledglings captured at colonies just before departure in comparison to fledglings washed up onbeaches and to fledglings attracted by artificial light along roads. We measured abundance of down, bodymass, and body condition index as the standardized residuals of a regression of body mass on size, andemployed linear models to test differences on body mass and body condition between locations. Beach-washed birds were underweight and in poor condition, suggesting their future survival probabilities at seawere low. Birds rescued on roads as a consequence of light attraction had lower body weights and conditionindices than fledglings captured at the colony. However, more than 50% of light-attracted birds had attainedsimilar weights to those of adults, suggesting they have higher probabilities of survival than beach-washedbirds. Water-logged birds being washed onto beaches is a natural process, but birds grounded by lightingalong roads is an increasing anthropogenic threat that requires management. Thus, management andconservation efforts should be directed to protect birds in the colonies and reduce light-induced mortality,ideally through the strategic reduction of light sources and lateral light spillage. When resources forconservation are limited, rescue programs should focus on rescuing birds from roads rather than beach-washed birds, which have a lower probability of survival.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022541X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2445  
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Author (up) Sharpe, C.M. openurl 
  Title Brief Outline of the History of Electric Illumination in the District of Columbia Type Journal Article
  Year 1946 Publication Records of the Columbia Historical Society, Washington, DC Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 48 Issue Pages 191-207  
  Keywords History  
  Abstract  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2430  
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Author (up) Sutton, P.C.; Anderson, S.J.; Elvidge, C.D.; Tuttle, B.T.; Ghosh, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Paving the planet: impervious surface as proxy measure of the human ecological footprint Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Progress in Physical Geography: Earth and Environment Abbreviated Journal Progress in Physical Geography: Earth and Environment  
  Volume 33 Issue 4 Pages 510-527  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Fundamental questions regarding the human-environment-sustainability problematic remain contested. What are the relative roles of population, consumption, and technology with respect to sustainability? How can sustainability be measured? Numerous metrics have been developed to address these controversial questions including ideas of carrying capacity, environmental sustainability indices, and ecological footprints. This work explores the question: is pavement a proxy measure of human impact on the environment? We explore and evaluate the use of satellite derived density grids of constructed area (aka ‘pavement’ or ‘impervious surface’) in the calculation of national and subnational ‘ecological footprints’. We generated a global constructed area density grid for the 2000—2001 period using satellite observed nighttime lights and a population count grid from the US Department of Energy. Satellite data inputs to the population product include MODIS landcover, SRTM topography and high-resolution imagery. Calibration of the global constructed area density product was derived from high-resolution aerial photographs. We demonstrate that a satellite derived constructed area per person index can serve as a proxy measure of ecological footprints at both the national and subnational level. This relatively simple and globally uniform measure of human impact on the environment correlates strongly with other more difficult to obtain measures.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0309-1333 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2441  
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Author (up) Truscott, Z.; Booth, D.T.; Limpus, C.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effect of on-shore light pollution on sea-turtle hatchlings commencing their off-shore swim Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Wildlife Research Abbreviated Journal Wildl. Res.  
  Volume 44 Issue 2 Pages 127  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Context: Off-shore recruitment impairment of sea-turtle hatchlings because of light pollution is a growing concern to conservation of sea-turtle population throughout the world. Studies have focussed on sea-turtle hatchling sea-finding behaviour, and ignored the possible effect that on-shore lighting might have on hatchlings after they have entered the sea.

Aims: We experimentally evaluated the effect that on-shore light pollution has on the swimming behaviour of green turtle hatchlings once they have entered the sea and begun swimming off-shore. We also estimated the decrease in off-shore recruitment of hatchlings as a result of light pollution disruption of the off-shore swim.

Methods: Hatchling misorientation rates were quantified by releasing marked hatchlings to the sea from different land-based locations adjacent to light-polluted beach areas under a variety of environmental conditions. The beach in light-polluted regions was then searched for marked hatchlings returning to shore from the sea.

Key results: Misorientation rates were highest in trials conducted during moonless nights (66.7% of trials had some hatchlings return to shore) and lowest during trials conducted during moonlit nights (no trials had hatchlings return to shore). Green turtle hatchling off-shore recruitment for the entire 2014–15 nesting season at Heron Island was estimated to decrease 1.0 –2.4% as a result of on-shore lights disrupting hatchling off-shore swimming behaviour.

Conclusions: On moonless nights, sea-turtle hatchlings after having successfully completed their journey from nest to sea and entered the sea can be lured back to shore again by shore-based light pollution and, this will decrease their off-shore recruitment success.

Implications: To ensure maximum off-shore recruitment of sea-turtle hatchlings, on-shore light pollution adjacent to nesting beaches needs to be minimised so as to minimise misorientation and disorientation of hatchlings while on the beach and in near-shore waters.
 
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1035-3712 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2448  
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