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Author Barducci, A.; Marcoionni, P.; Pippi, I.; Poggesi, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of light pollution revealed during a nocturnal aerial survey by two hyperspectral imagers Type Journal Article
  Year 2003 Publication Applied Optics Abbreviated Journal Appl. Opt.  
  Volume 42 Issue 21 Pages (down) 4349  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract A remote-sensing campaign was performed in September 2001 at nighttime under clear-sky conditions before moonrise to assess the level of light pollution of urban and industrial origin. Two hyperspectral sensors, namely, the Multispectral Infrared and Visible Imaging Spectrometer and the Visible Infrared Scanner-200, which provide spectral coverage from the visible to the thermal infrared, were flown over the Tuscany coast (Italy) on board a Casa 212 airplane. The acquired images were processed to produce radiometrically calibrated data, which were then analyzed and compared with ground-based spectral measurements. Calibrated data acquired at high spectral resolution (∼2.5 nm) showed a maximum scene brightness almost of the same order of magnitude as that observed during similar daytime measurements, whereas their average luminosity was 3 orders of magnitude lower. The measurement analysis confirmed that artificial illumination hinders astronomical observations and produces noticeable effects even at great distances from the sources of the illumination.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-6935 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2438  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Raap, T.; Pinxten, R.; Casasole, G.; Dehnhard, N.; Eens, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Ambient anthropogenic noise but not light is associated with the ecophysiology of free-living songbird nestlings Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages (down) 2754  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Urbanization is associated with dramatic increases in noise and light pollution, which affect animal behaviour, physiology and fitness. However, few studies have examined these stressors simultaneously. Moreover, effects of urbanization during early-life may be detrimental but are largely unknown. In developing great tits (Parus major), a frequently-used model species, we determined important indicators of immunity and physiological condition: plasma haptoglobin (Hp) and nitric oxide (NOx) concentration. We also determined fledging mass, an indicator for current health and survival. Associations of ambient noise and light exposure with these indicators were studied. Anthropogenic noise, light and their interaction were unrelated to fledging mass. Nestlings exposed to more noise showed higher plasma levels of Hp but not of NOx. Light was unrelated to Hp and NOx and did not interact with the effect of noise on nestlings' physiology. Increasing levels of Hp are potentially energy demanding and trade-offs could occur with life-history traits, such as survival. Effects of light pollution on nestlings of a cavity-nesting species appear to be limited. Nonetheless, our results suggest that the urban environment, through noise exposure, may entail important physiological costs for developing organisms.  
  Address Department of Biology, Behavioural Ecology and Ecophysiology Group, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk, Belgium  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28584270; PMCID:PMC5459827 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2451  
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Author McMahon, T.A.; Rohr, J.R.; Bernal, X.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light and noise pollution interact to disrupt interspecific interactions Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Ecology Abbreviated Journal Ecology  
  Volume 98 Issue 5 Pages (down) 1290-1299  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Studies on the consequences of urbanization often examine the effects of light, noise, and heat pollution independently on isolated species providing a limited understanding of how these combined stressors affect species interactions. Here, we investigate how these factors interact to affect parasitic frog-biting midges (Corethrella spp.) and their tungara frog (Engystomops pustulosus) hosts. A survey of tungara frog calling sites revealed that frog abundance was not significantly correlated with urbanization, light, noise, or temperature. In contrast, frog-biting midges were sensitive to light pollution and noise pollution. Increased light intensity significantly reduced midge abundance at low noise levels. At high noise intensity, there were no midges regardless of light level. Two field experiments controlling light and noise levels to examine attraction of the midges to their host and their feeding behavior confirmed the causality of these field patterns. These findings demonstrate that both light and noise pollution disrupt this host-parasite interaction and highlight the importance of considering interactions among species and types of pollutants to accurately assess the impacts of urbanization on ecological communities.  
  Address Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, 915 West State Street, West Lafayette, Indiana, 47907, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0012-9658 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28170099 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2443  
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Author Bedrosian, T.A.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Timing of light exposure affects mood and brain circuits Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Translational Psychiatry Abbreviated Journal Transl Psychiatry  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages (down) e1017  
  Keywords Human Health; Review  
  Abstract Temporal organization of physiology is critical for human health. In the past, humans experienced predictable periods of daily light and dark driven by the solar day, which allowed for entrainment of intrinsic circadian rhythms to the environmental light-dark cycles. Since the adoption of electric light, however, pervasive exposure to nighttime lighting has blurred the boundaries of day and night, making it more difficult to synchronize biological processes. Many systems are under circadian control, including sleep-wake behavior, hormone secretion, cellular function and gene expression. Circadian disruption by nighttime light perturbs those processes and is associated with increasing incidence of certain cancers, metabolic dysfunction and mood disorders. This review focuses on the role of artificial light at night in mood regulation, including mechanisms through which aberrant light exposure affects the brain. Converging evidence suggests that circadian disruption alters the function of brain regions involved in emotion and mood regulation. This occurs through direct neural input from the clock or indirect effects, including altered neuroplasticity, neurotransmission and clock gene expression. Recently, the aberrant light exposure has been recognized for its health effects. This review summarizes the evidence linking aberrant light exposure to mood.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Group, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2158-3188 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28140399; PMCID:PMC5299389 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2446  
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Author Rodríguez, A.; Moffett, J.; Revoltós, A.; Wasiak, P.; McIntosh, R.R.; Sutherland, D.R.; Renwick, L.; Dann, P.; Chiaradia, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light pollution and seabird fledglings: Targeting efforts in rescue programs: Assessing Condition Of Rescued Seabirds Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The Journal of Wildlife Management Abbreviated Journal Jour. Wild. Mgmt.  
  Volume 81 Issue 4 Pages (down) 734-741  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract One of the most critical phases in the life of petrels (Procellariiformes) is at fledging whenyoung birds pass from parental dependence on land to an independent life at sea. To mitigate mortality at thistime, rescue programs are implemented near breeding sites around the world, especially for birds grounded byartificial lights. We evaluated the plumage and body condition of short-tailed shearwater (Ardennatenuirostris) fledglings captured at colonies just before departure in comparison to fledglings washed up onbeaches and to fledglings attracted by artificial light along roads. We measured abundance of down, bodymass, and body condition index as the standardized residuals of a regression of body mass on size, andemployed linear models to test differences on body mass and body condition between locations. Beach-washed birds were underweight and in poor condition, suggesting their future survival probabilities at seawere low. Birds rescued on roads as a consequence of light attraction had lower body weights and conditionindices than fledglings captured at the colony. However, more than 50% of light-attracted birds had attainedsimilar weights to those of adults, suggesting they have higher probabilities of survival than beach-washedbirds. Water-logged birds being washed onto beaches is a natural process, but birds grounded by lightingalong roads is an increasing anthropogenic threat that requires management. Thus, management andconservation efforts should be directed to protect birds in the colonies and reduce light-induced mortality,ideally through the strategic reduction of light sources and lateral light spillage. When resources forconservation are limited, rescue programs should focus on rescuing birds from roads rather than beach-washed birds, which have a lower probability of survival.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022541X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2445  
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