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Author Hungerford, H.B.; Spangler, P.J.; Walker, N.A. url  openurl
  Title (up) Subaquatic light traps for insects and other animal organisms Type Journal Article
  Year 1955 Publication Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 58 Issue 3 Pages 387-407  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract  
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  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2431  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Truscott, Z.; Booth, D.T.; Limpus, C.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) The effect of on-shore light pollution on sea-turtle hatchlings commencing their off-shore swim Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Wildlife Research Abbreviated Journal Wildl. Res.  
  Volume 44 Issue 2 Pages 127  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Context: Off-shore recruitment impairment of sea-turtle hatchlings because of light pollution is a growing concern to conservation of sea-turtle population throughout the world. Studies have focussed on sea-turtle hatchling sea-finding behaviour, and ignored the possible effect that on-shore lighting might have on hatchlings after they have entered the sea.

Aims: We experimentally evaluated the effect that on-shore light pollution has on the swimming behaviour of green turtle hatchlings once they have entered the sea and begun swimming off-shore. We also estimated the decrease in off-shore recruitment of hatchlings as a result of light pollution disruption of the off-shore swim.

Methods: Hatchling misorientation rates were quantified by releasing marked hatchlings to the sea from different land-based locations adjacent to light-polluted beach areas under a variety of environmental conditions. The beach in light-polluted regions was then searched for marked hatchlings returning to shore from the sea.

Key results: Misorientation rates were highest in trials conducted during moonless nights (66.7% of trials had some hatchlings return to shore) and lowest during trials conducted during moonlit nights (no trials had hatchlings return to shore). Green turtle hatchling off-shore recruitment for the entire 2014–15 nesting season at Heron Island was estimated to decrease 1.0 –2.4% as a result of on-shore lights disrupting hatchling off-shore swimming behaviour.

Conclusions: On moonless nights, sea-turtle hatchlings after having successfully completed their journey from nest to sea and entered the sea can be lured back to shore again by shore-based light pollution and, this will decrease their off-shore recruitment success.

Implications: To ensure maximum off-shore recruitment of sea-turtle hatchlings, on-shore light pollution adjacent to nesting beaches needs to be minimised so as to minimise misorientation and disorientation of hatchlings while on the beach and in near-shore waters.
 
  Address  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1035-3712 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2448  
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Author Garstang, R.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) The Status and Prospects for Ground-Based Observatory Sites Type Journal Article
  Year 1989 Publication Annual Review of Astronomy and Astrophysics Abbreviated Journal Annu. Rev. Astron. Astrophys.  
  Volume 27 Issue 1 Pages 19-40  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0066-4146 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2437  
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Author Bedrosian, T.A.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Timing of light exposure affects mood and brain circuits Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Translational Psychiatry Abbreviated Journal Transl Psychiatry  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages e1017  
  Keywords Review; Human Health  
  Abstract Temporal organization of physiology is critical for human health. In the past, humans experienced predictable periods of daily light and dark driven by the solar day, which allowed for entrainment of intrinsic circadian rhythms to the environmental light-dark cycles. Since the adoption of electric light, however, pervasive exposure to nighttime lighting has blurred the boundaries of day and night, making it more difficult to synchronize biological processes. Many systems are under circadian control, including sleep-wake behavior, hormone secretion, cellular function and gene expression. Circadian disruption by nighttime light perturbs those processes and is associated with increasing incidence of certain cancers, metabolic dysfunction and mood disorders. This review focuses on the role of artificial light at night in mood regulation, including mechanisms through which aberrant light exposure affects the brain. Converging evidence suggests that circadian disruption alters the function of brain regions involved in emotion and mood regulation. This occurs through direct neural input from the clock or indirect effects, including altered neuroplasticity, neurotransmission and clock gene expression. Recently, the aberrant light exposure has been recognized for its health effects. This review summarizes the evidence linking aberrant light exposure to mood.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Group, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2158-3188 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28140399; PMCID:PMC5299389 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2446  
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Author Gineste, B.; Souquet, M.; Couzi, F.-X.; Giloux, Y.; Philippe, J.-S.; Hoarau, C.; Tourmetz, J.; Potin, G.; Le Corre, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Tropical Shearwater population stability at Reunion Island, despite light pollution Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Ornithology Abbreviated Journal J Ornithol  
  Volume 158 Issue 2 Pages 385-394  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Seabirds are exposed to numerous threats at sea and on land, and they are among the most endangered birds worldwide. Procellariids are attracted by artificial light, and this causes massive fallout at various places of the world. In Reunion Island, Tropical Shearwaters Puffinus bailloni are heavily impacted by light pollution. To assess the population trends of this species, we conducted two large-scale acoustic surveys across the island (in 1996/1997 and in 2013/2015) and analysed the numbers of birds attracted by lights and rescued by the local wildlife rescue center between 1996 and 2015. We detected 220 colonies in 2013/2015, including 124 colonies previously surveyed in 1996/97 and 96 newly discovered colonies. The average vocal activity recorded at colonies was similar during the two surveys suggesting no marked change in population size. Some 13,200 Tropical Shearwaters were found grounded since 1996 due to light attraction, of which 88 % were successfully released. The number of reported grounded birds increased 19-fold between 1996 and 2015. This increase was due to a combination of factors that are difficult to disentangle: (1) increasing public awareness; (2) increasing light pollution; and (3) the absence of population collapse. Indeed, both acoustic surveys and the number of rescued birds indicate that the Tropical Shearwater population of Reunion Island did not decline between 1996/1997 and 2013/2015. We suggest that the rescue campaigns conducted annually strongly contributed to this stability. Thus, we recommend maintaining the rescue operations, but also to reduce light pollution.  
  Address  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2193-7192 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2447  
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