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Author McMahon, T.A.; Rohr, J.R.; Bernal, X.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light and noise pollution interact to disrupt interspecific interactions Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2017 Publication Ecology Abbreviated Journal Ecology  
  Volume 98 Issue 5 Pages 1290-1299  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Studies on the consequences of urbanization often examine the effects of light, noise, and heat pollution independently on isolated species providing a limited understanding of how these combined stressors affect species interactions. Here, we investigate how these factors interact to affect parasitic frog-biting midges (Corethrella spp.) and their tungara frog (Engystomops pustulosus) hosts. A survey of tungara frog calling sites revealed that frog abundance was not significantly correlated with urbanization, light, noise, or temperature. In contrast, frog-biting midges were sensitive to light pollution and noise pollution. Increased light intensity significantly reduced midge abundance at low noise levels. At high noise intensity, there were no midges regardless of light level. Two field experiments controlling light and noise levels to examine attraction of the midges to their host and their feeding behavior confirmed the causality of these field patterns. These findings demonstrate that both light and noise pollution disrupt this host-parasite interaction and highlight the importance of considering interactions among species and types of pollutants to accurately assess the impacts of urbanization on ecological communities.  
  Address Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, 915 West State Street, West Lafayette, Indiana, 47907, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0012-9658 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28170099 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2443  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ciach, M.; Fröhlich, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Habitat type, food resources, noise and light pollution explain the species composition, abundance and stability of a winter bird assemblage in an urban environment Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2017 Publication Urban Ecosystems Abbreviated Journal Urban Ecosyst  
  Volume 20 Issue 3 Pages 547-559  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract At present, urban areas cover almost 3% of the Earth’s terrestrial area, and this proportion is constantly increasing. Although urbanization leads to a decline in biodiversity, at the same time it creates extensive habitats that are exploited by an assemblage of organisms, including birds. The species composition and density of birds nesting in towns and cities are determined by the types of buildings, the structure and maturity of urban greenery, and habitat diversity. In contrast, the habitat traits shaping the community of birds wintering in urban areas are not known. The aim of this work was to assess the influence of habitat structure, food resources and the urban effects (pollution, noise, artificial light) on an assemblage of birds overwintering in an urban area. It was carried out in 2014 and 2015 in the city of Kraków (southern Poland), on 56 randomly chosen sample plots, in which the composition, density and interseasonal similarity of bird assemblage were assessed with line transect method. A total of 64 bird species (mean = 17.7 ± 4.9 SD species/plot) was recorded. The mean density was 89.6 ind./km ±63.3 SD. The most numerous species were Great Tit Parus major, Magpie Pica pica, Blackbird Turdus merula, Blue Tit Cyanistes caeruleus, Rook Corvus frugilegus, Fieldfare Turdus pilaris and House Sparrow Passer domesticus. Noise adversely affected species numbers and density, but artificial light acted positively on the density of birds and their interseasonal stability. The species richness and density of birds were also determined by the number of food sources available (e.g. bird-feeders). In addition, the greater the proportion of open areas, the fewer species were recorded. In contrast, the more urban greenery there was, the greater the density of the entire bird assemblage. Urban infrastructure (buildings, roads, refuse tips) had a positive effect on the interseasonal stabilization of the species composition of wintering birds. The results of this work indicate that the urban effect, i.e. noise and light pollution, apart from purely habitat factors, provide a good explanation for the species richness, density and stability of bird assemblage wintering in urban areas.  
  Address  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1083-8155 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2444  
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Author Rodríguez, A.; Moffett, J.; Revoltós, A.; Wasiak, P.; McIntosh, R.R.; Sutherland, D.R.; Renwick, L.; Dann, P.; Chiaradia, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light pollution and seabird fledglings: Targeting efforts in rescue programs: Assessing Condition Of Rescued Seabirds Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2017 Publication The Journal of Wildlife Management Abbreviated Journal Jour. Wild. Mgmt.  
  Volume 81 Issue 4 Pages 734-741  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract One of the most critical phases in the life of petrels (Procellariiformes) is at fledging whenyoung birds pass from parental dependence on land to an independent life at sea. To mitigate mortality at thistime, rescue programs are implemented near breeding sites around the world, especially for birds grounded byartificial lights. We evaluated the plumage and body condition of short-tailed shearwater (Ardennatenuirostris) fledglings captured at colonies just before departure in comparison to fledglings washed up onbeaches and to fledglings attracted by artificial light along roads. We measured abundance of down, bodymass, and body condition index as the standardized residuals of a regression of body mass on size, andemployed linear models to test differences on body mass and body condition between locations. Beach-washed birds were underweight and in poor condition, suggesting their future survival probabilities at seawere low. Birds rescued on roads as a consequence of light attraction had lower body weights and conditionindices than fledglings captured at the colony. However, more than 50% of light-attracted birds had attainedsimilar weights to those of adults, suggesting they have higher probabilities of survival than beach-washedbirds. Water-logged birds being washed onto beaches is a natural process, but birds grounded by lightingalong roads is an increasing anthropogenic threat that requires management. Thus, management andconservation efforts should be directed to protect birds in the colonies and reduce light-induced mortality,ideally through the strategic reduction of light sources and lateral light spillage. When resources forconservation are limited, rescue programs should focus on rescuing birds from roads rather than beach-washed birds, which have a lower probability of survival.  
  Address  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022541X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2445  
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Author Bedrosian, T.A.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Timing of light exposure affects mood and brain circuits Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2017 Publication Translational Psychiatry Abbreviated Journal Transl Psychiatry  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages e1017  
  Keywords Review; Human Health  
  Abstract Temporal organization of physiology is critical for human health. In the past, humans experienced predictable periods of daily light and dark driven by the solar day, which allowed for entrainment of intrinsic circadian rhythms to the environmental light-dark cycles. Since the adoption of electric light, however, pervasive exposure to nighttime lighting has blurred the boundaries of day and night, making it more difficult to synchronize biological processes. Many systems are under circadian control, including sleep-wake behavior, hormone secretion, cellular function and gene expression. Circadian disruption by nighttime light perturbs those processes and is associated with increasing incidence of certain cancers, metabolic dysfunction and mood disorders. This review focuses on the role of artificial light at night in mood regulation, including mechanisms through which aberrant light exposure affects the brain. Converging evidence suggests that circadian disruption alters the function of brain regions involved in emotion and mood regulation. This occurs through direct neural input from the clock or indirect effects, including altered neuroplasticity, neurotransmission and clock gene expression. Recently, the aberrant light exposure has been recognized for its health effects. This review summarizes the evidence linking aberrant light exposure to mood.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Group, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2158-3188 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28140399; PMCID:PMC5299389 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2446  
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Author Gineste, B.; Souquet, M.; Couzi, F.-X.; Giloux, Y.; Philippe, J.-S.; Hoarau, C.; Tourmetz, J.; Potin, G.; Le Corre, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Tropical Shearwater population stability at Reunion Island, despite light pollution Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2017 Publication Journal of Ornithology Abbreviated Journal J Ornithol  
  Volume 158 Issue 2 Pages 385-394  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Seabirds are exposed to numerous threats at sea and on land, and they are among the most endangered birds worldwide. Procellariids are attracted by artificial light, and this causes massive fallout at various places of the world. In Reunion Island, Tropical Shearwaters Puffinus bailloni are heavily impacted by light pollution. To assess the population trends of this species, we conducted two large-scale acoustic surveys across the island (in 1996/1997 and in 2013/2015) and analysed the numbers of birds attracted by lights and rescued by the local wildlife rescue center between 1996 and 2015. We detected 220 colonies in 2013/2015, including 124 colonies previously surveyed in 1996/97 and 96 newly discovered colonies. The average vocal activity recorded at colonies was similar during the two surveys suggesting no marked change in population size. Some 13,200 Tropical Shearwaters were found grounded since 1996 due to light attraction, of which 88 % were successfully released. The number of reported grounded birds increased 19-fold between 1996 and 2015. This increase was due to a combination of factors that are difficult to disentangle: (1) increasing public awareness; (2) increasing light pollution; and (3) the absence of population collapse. Indeed, both acoustic surveys and the number of rescued birds indicate that the Tropical Shearwater population of Reunion Island did not decline between 1996/1997 and 2013/2015. We suggest that the rescue campaigns conducted annually strongly contributed to this stability. Thus, we recommend maintaining the rescue operations, but also to reduce light pollution.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2193-7192 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2447  
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