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Author (up) Ford, S.; Kidd, P.; Nashand, K.; Rietveld, A. url  openurl
  Title ARTIFICIAL LIGHT AND MOTH BIODIVERSITY: A COMPARISON OF MOTH DIVERSITY ACROSS DIFFERENT HABITATS ON LUNDY TO INVESTIGATE THE EFFECT OF ARTIFICIAL LIGHT Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of the Lundy Field Society Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 7 Issue Pages 53-68  
  Keywords Animals; Lundy; Moths  
  Abstract Moths perform important roles within ecosystems. Behavioural responses to artificial light disrupt adaptive behaviours, causing population declines. Island populations can assess moth population attracted to artificial light, distinct from urbanisation. Here we present results from day counts of moth larvae and nocturnal Skinner light-traps from Lundy. Findings reveal a significant difference between moth population dynamics and species at differing locations.Overall, numbers of individuals and species caught with the UV-light trap were significantly greater than LED sources.These findings can be applied to potential artificial light changes on Lundy, as well as further changes throughout the United Kingdom  
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  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3132  
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Author (up) Peng, J.; Lin, H.; Chen, Y.; Blaschke, T.; Luo, L.; Xu, Z.; Hu, Y.’na; Zhao, M.; Wu, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Spatiotemporal evolution of urban agglomerations in China during 2000–2012: a nighttime light approach Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Landscape Ecology Abbreviated Journal Landscape Ecol  
  Volume 35 Issue 2 Pages 421-434  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Context

Urban agglomeration is an advanced spatial organization of cities, usually caused by urbanization processes when cities develop to a certain level – typically associated with higher population density and a certain density of built environment. However, compared with various studies focusing on specific cities, urban agglomerations are still understudied, especially for the quantitative identification of spatiotemporal evolution of urban agglomerations.

Objectives

This study aims to identify the boundary of urban agglomerations in China from 2000 to 2012, and to explore the temporal evolution and spatial difference of urban agglomerations.

Methods

Firstly, the core zone of urban agglomerations was identified using an appropriate threshold of the digital number (DN) of nighttime light. Secondly, the mean patch area and gravity model were used to determine the affected zone of urban agglomerations. Thirdly, spatiotemporal contrast was conducted focusing on the 23 main urban agglomerations in China.

Results

By 2012, the most highly developed Yangtze River Delta and Pearl River Delta urban agglomerations met the standard of world level, with the Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei urban agglomeration for regional level, as well as 11 urban agglomerations for sub-regional level. Regional differences in urban agglomerations between southern and northern China, or between coastal and inland China remained stable over the study period of 2000–2012. Compared with the western urban agglomerations, the outward expansion of eastern urban agglomerations decelerated. From 2000 to 2012, the overall development mode of urban agglomerations shifted from the core-expansion to the peripheral-development, together with slower expansion of urban agglomerations after 2006.

Conclusions

Nighttime light data are effective in exploring the spatiotemporal evolution of urban agglomerations.
 
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0921-2973 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3131  
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