toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author (up) Alam M.; Dappe M. H.; Melecky M.; Goldblatt R. url  openurl
  Title Wider Economic Benefits of Transport Corridors: Evidence from International Development Organizations Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Policy Research Working Paper Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue 9057 Pages  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract This paper collects meta data on transport corridor projects financed by the Asian Development Bank, Japan International Cooperation Agency, and World Bank and links them to one important wider economic benefit -- local economic activity. The meta data cover 47 projects in 16 countries, with appraisal dates between 1991 and 2007. First, the paper reviews the variation in project design and implementation -- including the local initial conditions, complementary non-transport interventions, and private sector involvement. Second, using the difference-in-differences methodology, the paper links this variation to a measure of local economic activity -- the geocoded intensity of nighttime lights. The effect of the supported corridor projects on local economic activity could be very heterogenous and significantly depend on certain initial conditions and project characteristics. The latter could include locations with access to the sea, as well as projects with a strong theory of change and better engagement of the private sector.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3163  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Almpanidou, V.; Tsapalou, V.; Tsavdaridou, A.I.; Mazaris, A.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The dark side of raptors’ distribution ranges under climate change Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Landscape Ecology Abbreviated Journal Landscape Ecol  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 1435-1443  
  Keywords Animals; Remote sensing  
  Abstract Context

Artificial light at night (ALAN) represents a significant threat to biodiversity. Given that protected areas (PAs) are in relative darkness compared to the surrounding sites, they could be considered an effective tool towards eliminating the impacts of ALAN. However, the extent to which climate change-induced shifts would drive species out of PAs and thus, alter their exposure to ALAN remains an open question.

Objectives

We assessed the extent and protection coverage of dark areas across the current and future distributions of 39 raptor species of European conservation interest.

Methods

We initially developed a set of distribution models using current and projected climatic variables. Next, we used a satellite dataset of nighttime lights composite to determine the spread of ALAN within the raptors’ ranges. Finally, we applied three indices of proportional changes in the expansion of suitable habitats and dark areas to quantify patterns in ALAN within the current and future raptors’ ranges across Europe.

Results

Our analyses revealed that potential future distribution shifts of raptors will lead to changes in the exposure of species to ALAN, with these patterns being rather unfavourable for most of them. Still, PAs in Europe were found to offer a relative high proportion of dark areas which overlap with the current and future raptors range.

Conclusions

Our findings provided some first insights into the spatial conflict between species ranges and ALAN, considering potential distribution shifts driven by climate change. The proposed methodology offers the means to identify potential dark refugia towards prioritizing conservation actions.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0921-2973 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3157  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Arellano, B.; Roca, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Extraction Of Urbanized Areas Through Images Of High Resolution Nighttime Lights Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication ISPRS – International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences Abbreviated Journal Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci.  
  Volume Xliii-B3-2020 Issue Pages 649-655  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Satellite nocturnal images of the earth are a useful way to identify urbanisation. Nighttime lights have been used in a variety of scientific contributions, including studies on the identification of metropolitan areas as well as landscapes impacted by urbanization. However, the study of urban systems by nighttime light imagery has had a fundamental limitation to date: the low spatial resolution of satellite sensors. Although the DMSP Operational Linescan System (OLS) has been gathering global low-light imaging data for over 40 years, its 2.7 km/pixel footprint has limited its use for in-depth studies of urban development. The 2011 launch by NASA and the NOAA of the Suomi National Polar Partnership (SNPP) satellite, with the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensor on board, has led to a significant improvement. This instrument has better spatial resolution (742 m/pixel), on-board calibration, a greater radiometric range, and fewer saturation and blooming problems than DMSP-OLS data. However, it still has considerable limitations for the in-depth study of the area and internal structure of urban systems.

The launch of Luojia 1-01 in June 2018 has increased expectations. LJ1-01 is a nano satellite that can obtain high-resolution nocturnal images (130 metres/pixel). The aim of this paper is to analyse, and compare with previous satellites, the new instrument’s capacity to delimit the urbanised area and its efficiency in identifying types of urban landscape (compact, dispersed and rurban). The study cases are Barcelona Metropolitan Region (Spain) and Shenzhen City (China).
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2194-9034 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3106  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Aulsebrook, A.E.; Connelly, F.; Johnsson, R.D.; Jones, T.M.; Mulder, R.A.; Hall, M.L.; Vyssotski, A.L.; Lesku, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title White and Amber Light at Night Disrupt Sleep Physiology in Birds Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals; anthropogenic; avian; blue light; circadian rhythms; electroencephalogram; light pollution; light spectra; sleep homeostasis; slow wave sleep; urbanization  
  Abstract Artificial light at night can disrupt sleep in humans [1-4] and other animals [5-10]. A key mechanism for light to affect sleep is via non-visual photoreceptors that are most sensitive to short-wavelength (blue) light [11]. To minimize effects of artificial light on sleep, many electronic devices shift from white (blue-rich) to amber (blue-reduced) light in the evening. Switching outdoor lighting from white to amber might also benefit wildlife [12]. However, whether these two colors of light affect sleep similarly in different animals remains poorly understood. Here we show, by measuring brain activity, that both white and amber lighting disrupt sleep in birds but that the magnitude of these effects differs between species. When experimentally exposed to light at night at intensities typical of urban areas, domestic pigeons (Columba livia) and wild-caught Australian magpies (Cracticus tibicen tyrannica) slept less, favored non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep over REM sleep, slept less intensely, and had more fragmented sleep compared to when lights were switched off. In pigeons, these disruptive effects on sleep were similar for white and amber lighting. For magpies, however, amber light had less impact on sleep. Our results demonstrate that amber lighting can minimize sleep disruption in some birds but that this benefit may not be universal.  
  Address School of Life Sciences, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC 3086, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32707063 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3080  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bautista-Covarrubias, J.C.; Zamora-Ibarra, P.A.; Apreza-Burgos, E.; Rodriguez-Ocampo, A.N.; Peraza-Gomez, V.; Lopez-Sanchez, J.A.; Pacheco-Vega, J.M.; Gonzalez-Hermoso, J.P.; Frias-Espericueta, M.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Immune response and oxidative stress of shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei at different moon phases Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Fish & Shellfish Immunology Abbreviated Journal Fish Shellfish Immunol  
  Volume 106 Issue Pages 591-595  
  Keywords Moonlight; Animals; Moon phase; Oxidative stress; Sod; Shrimp; Vibrio  
  Abstract Moon phases influence the molting process of shrimp, which affect other physiological processes as immune response. This study analyzed some parameters of immune response: total hemocytes counts (THC), hemolymph clotting time and superoxide anion (O2(-)) production, total protein concentration, superoxide dismutase activity, and the presence of Vibrio spp. in Litopenaeus vannamei at different moon phases. The highest percentage of organisms in intermolt stage was observed in the first quarter moon phase (95%). The highest THC was observed at new moon phase, which was significantly different (p < 0.05) than that observed at the third quarter phase. Hemolymph clotting time and CFU values of Vibrio spp. showed no significant difference (p > 0.05) between different moon phases. The higher (p < 0.05) mean O2(-) production value (0.400 +/- 0.168 nmol min(-1) mL(-1)) was determined in hepatopancreas at new moon phase. No relationship was observed between O2(-) and SOD activity, indicating that this antioxidant response was enough to counteract the influence of oxidative stress in L. vannamei at different moon phases.  
  Address Laboratorio de Estudios Ambientales, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar, Universidad Autonoma de Sinaloa, Paseo Claussen s/n, Mazatlan, Sinaloa, C.P. 82000, Mexico  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1050-4648 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32846243 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3100  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: