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Author Russart, K.L.G.; Chbeir, S.A.; Nelson, R.J.; Magalang, U.J.
Title Light at night exacerbates metabolic dysfunction in a polygenic mouse model of type 2 diabetes mellitus Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Life Sciences Abbreviated Journal Life Sci
Volume 231 Issue Pages (down) 116574
Keywords Animals; diabetes; human health; mouse models; Type 2 diabetes; Insulin Resistance
Abstract AIMS: Electric lighting is beneficial to modern society; however, it is becoming apparent that light at night (LAN) is not without biological consequences. Several studies have reported negative effects of LAN on health and behavior in humans and nonhuman animals. Exposure of non-diabetic mice to dim LAN impairs glucose tolerance, whereas a return to dark nights (LD) reverses this impairment. We predicted that exposure to LAN would exacerbate the metabolic abnormalities in TALLYHO/JngJ (TH) mice, a polygenic model of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We exposed 7-week old male TH mice to either LD or LAN for 8-10weeks in two separate experiments. After 8weeks of light treatment, we conducted intraperitoneal glucose tolerance testing (ipGTT) followed by intraperitoneal insulin tolerance testing (ipITT). In Experiment 1, all mice were returned to LD for 4weeks, and ipITT was repeated. KEY FINDINGS: The major results of this study are i) LAN exposure for 8weeks exacerbates glucose intolerance and insulin resistance ii) the effects of LAN on insulin resistance are reversed upon return to LD, iii) LAN exposure results in a greater increase in body weight compared to LD exposure, iv) LAN increases the incidence of mice developing overt T2DM, and v) LAN exposure decreases survival of mice with T2DM. SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, LAN exacerbated metabolic abnormalities in a polygenic mouse model of T2DM, and these effects were reversed upon return to dark nights. The applicability of these findings to humans with T2DM needs to be determined.
Address Department of Neuroscience, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210, USA; Department of Internal Medicine, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0024-3205 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31207311 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2549
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Author Xiao, H.; Cai, H.; Li, X.
Title Non-visual effects of indoor light environment on humans: A review Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Physiology & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Physiology & Behavior
Volume in press Issue Pages (down) 113195
Keywords Review; Human Health
Abstract As a result of the desire to improve living standards, increasing attention is paid to creating a comfortable and healthy lighting environment that contributes to human health and well-being. It is crucial to understand the effects of environmental lighting regulation on humans’ physical responses and mental activities. In this review, we focus on the scientific research on light-induced non-visual effects on humans, providing a systematic review of how the quantity of light, spectral changes, time of day, and duration have effects on the circadian rhythm, alertness, and mood based on eligible literature. The key findings are as follows: (1) The increase of illuminance and correlated colour temperature (CCT) at night were both positively associated with melatonin suppression, thus affecting the circadian rhythm. Meanwhile, a high CCT is conducive to the stimulation of positive mood. (2) Blue light and high CCT light at night induced delayed phase shift, and the objective alertness was reduced under the condition of lack of blue components. (3) High illuminance was positively correlated with subjective alertness during daytime, and increased the positive mood in the morning and decreased it in the afternoon. These findings serve as an important reference for stakeholders to optimise lighting in constructed environments to improve health and well-being considering the non-visual effects above and beyond visual performance.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0031-9384 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3168
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Author Nehme, P.A.; Amaral, F.; Lowden, A.; Skene, D.J.; Cipolla-Neto, J.; Moreno, C.R.C.
Title Reduced melatonin synthesis in pregnant night workers: metabolic implications for offspring Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Medical Hypotheses Abbreviated Journal Medical Hypotheses
Volume 132 Issue Pages (down) 109353
Keywords Human Health; Pregnancy; Melatonin; Melatonin synthesis; Circadian disruption; shift work
Abstract Several novel animal studies have shown that intrauterine metabolic programming can be modified in the event of reduced melatonin synthesis during pregnancy, leading to glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in the offspring. It is therefore postulated that female night workers when pregnant may expose the offspring to unwanted health threats. This may be explained by the fact that melatonin is essential for regulating energy metabolism and can influence reproductive activity. Moreover, the circadian misalignment caused by shift work affects fertility and the fetus, increasing the risk of miscarriage, premature birth and low birth weight, phenomena observed in night workers. Thus, we hypothesize that light-induced melatonin suppression as a result of night work may alter intrauterine metabolic programming in pregnant women, potentially leading to metabolic disorders in their offspring.
Address School of Public Health, University of São Paulo, Brazil
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0306-9877 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2610
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Author Xiao, Q.; Gee, G.; Jones, R.R.; Jia, P.; James, P.; Hale, L.
Title Cross-sectional association between outdoor artificial light at night and sleep duration in middle-to-older aged adults: The NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Environ Res
Volume 180 Issue Pages (down) 108823
Keywords Remote Sensing; Human Health; Artificial light at night; Circadian disruption; Neighborhood; Sleep; Socioeconomic disadvantage
Abstract INTRODUCTION: Artificial light at night (ALAN) can disrupt circadian rhythms and cause sleep disturbances. Several previous epidemiological studies have reported an association between higher levels of outdoor ALAN and shorter sleep duration. However, it remains unclear how this association may differ by individual- and neighborhood-level socioeconomic status, and whether ALAN may also be associated with longer sleep duration. METHODS: We assessed the cross-sectional relationship between outdoor ALAN and self-reported sleep duration in 333,365 middle- to older-aged men and women in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Study participants reported baseline addresses, which were geocoded and linked with outdoor ALAN exposure measured by satellite imagery data obtained from the U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System. We used multinomial logistic regression to estimate the multinomial odds ratio (MOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the likelihood of reporting very short (<5h), short (<7h) and long (>/=9h) sleep relative to reporting 7-8h of sleep across quintiles of LAN. We also conducted subgroup analyses by individual-level education and census tract-level poverty levels. RESULTS: We found that higher levels of ALAN were associated with both very short and short sleep. When compared to the lowest quintile, the highest quintile of ALAN was associated with 16% and 25% increases in the likelihood of reporting short sleep in women (MORQ1 vs Q5, (95% CI), 1.16 (1.10, 1.22)) and men (1.25 (1.19, 1.31)), respectively. Moreover, we found that higher ALAN was associated with a decrease in the likelihood of reporting long sleep in men (0.79 (0.71, 0.89)). We also found that the associations between ALAN and short sleep were larger in neighborhoods with higher levels of poverty. CONCLUSIONS: The burden of short sleep may be higher among residents in areas with higher levels of outdoor LAN, and this association is likely stronger in poorer neighborhoods. Future studies should investigate the potential benefits of reducing light intensity in high ALAN areas in improve sleep health.
Address Program in Public Health, Department of Family, Population, and Preventive Medicine, Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0013-9351 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31627155 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2702
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Author Zhu, X.; Guo, X.; Zhang, J.; Liu, J.; Jiang, F.
Title Phosphor-free, color-mixed, and efficient illuminant: Multi-chip packaged LEDs for optimizing blue light hazard and non-visual biological effects Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Optics and Lasers in Engineering Abbreviated Journal Optics and Lasers in Engineering
Volume 134 Issue Pages (down) 106174
Keywords Lighting; Human Health
Abstract Currently many evaluation models on the photobiological effects (PBE) of light sources do not consider the influence of age and luminance on the pupil diameter, which affects the light radiation intensity on the human retina. In this study, the pupil diameter is taken into consideration when evaluating the PBE of several light sources. Moreover, the correction factor M is proposed. The blue light hazard (BLH) efficacy and the circadian rhythm (CR) effects of the daylight at dusk, together with three indoor light sources with a correlated color temperature (CCT) of about 3000 K were evaluated by using a corrected evaluation model. The results show that an incandescent lamp is more photobiologically friendly for humans, despite being inefficient. Based on high wall-plug efficiency (WPE) GaN-based yellow (565 nm, 24.3%@20 A/cm2) and green (522 nm, 41.3%@20 A/cm2) LEDs on silicon substrate, incandescent-like spectrum and phosphor-free color-mixed white LEDs (CM-LEDs) with a general color rendering index (CRI) of 94, a CCT of 2866 K, and an efficiency of 131 lm/W were manufactured by mixing blue, cyan, green, yellow and red LEDs. The PBE evaluation results of such CM-LEDs are superior to those of an incandescent lamp. Moreover, blue light free and candlelight-toned LEDs with an efficiency of 120.3 lm/W, a general CRI of 84, a special CRI R9 of 93.3, and a CCT of 1810 K were fabricated by mixing yellow and red LEDs (R&Y-mixed LEDs). The R&Y-mixed LEDs show no blue light weighted quantities and have a weaker influence on the CR shift. They are photobiologically friendly for humans and suitable for nocturnal indoor and outdoor lighting environments.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0143-8166 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2983
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