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Author Alzahrani, H.S.; Khuu, S.K.; Roy, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Modelling the effect of commercially available blue-blocking lenses on visual and non-visual functions Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Clinical & Experimental Optometry Abbreviated Journal Clin Exp Optom  
  Volume in press Issue Pages (down) cxo.12959  
  Keywords Human Health; blue-blocking lenses; non-visual functions; transmittance; visual functions  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Blue-blocking lenses (BBLs) are marketed as providing retinal protection from acute and cumulative exposure to blue light over time. The selective reduction in visible wavelengths transmitted through BBLs is known to influence the photosensitivity of retinal photoreceptors, which affects both visual and non-visual functions. This study measured the spectral transmittance of BBLs and evaluated their effect on blue perception, scotopic vision, circadian rhythm, and protection from photochemical retinal damage. METHODS: Seven different types of BBLs from six manufacturers and untinted control lenses with three different powers (+2.00 D, -2.00 D and Plano) were evaluated. The whiteness index of BBLs used in this study was calculated using Commission International de l'Eclairage (CIE) Standard Illuminates D65, and CIE 1964 Standard with a 2 degrees Observer. The protective qualities of BBLs and their effect on blue perception, scotopic vision, and circadian rhythm were evaluated based on their spectral transmittance, which was measured with a Cary 5,000 UV-Vis-NIR spectrophotometer. RESULTS: BBLs were found to reduce blue light (400-500 nm) by 6-43 per cent, providing significant protection from photochemical retinal damage compared to control lenses (p </= 0.05). All BBLs were capable of reducing the perception of blue colours, scotopic sensitivities and circadian sensitivities by 5-36 per cent, 5-24 per cent, and 4-27 per cent, respectively depending on the brand and power of the lens. CONCLUSION: BBLs can provide some protection to the human eye from photochemical retinal damage by reducing a portion of blue light that may affect visual and non-visual performances, such as those critical to scotopic vision, blue perception, and circadian rhythm.  
  Address School of Optometry and Vision Science, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0816-4622 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31441122 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2654  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Stefani, O.; Freyburger, M.; Veitz, S.; Basishvili, T.; Meyer, M.; Weibel, J.; Kobayashi, K.; Shirakawa, Y.; Cajochen, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Changing color and intensity of LED lighting across the day impacts on circadian melatonin rhythms and sleep in healthy men Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res  
  Volume in press Issue Pages (down) e12714  
  Keywords Human health; Lighting; cognition; humans; male; melatonin; non-visual effects of light; sleep; wakefulness  
  Abstract We examined whether dynamically changing light across a scheduled 16-h waking day influences sleepiness, cognitive performance, visual comfort, melatonin secretion, and sleep under controlled laboratory conditions in healthy men. Fourteen participants underwent a 49-h laboratory protocol in a repeated-measures study design. They spent the first 5-h in the evening under standard lighting, followed by an 8-h nocturnal sleep episode at habitual bedtimes. Thereafter, volunteers either woke up to static light or to a dynamic light that changed spectrum and intensity across the scheduled 16-h waking day. Following an 8-h nocturnal sleep episode, the volunteers spent another 11-h either under static or dynamic light. Static light attenuated the evening rise in melatonin levels more compared to dynamic light as indexed by a significant reduction in the melatonin AUC prior to bedtime during static light only. Participants felt less vigilant in the evening during dynamic light. After dynamic light, sleep latency was significantly shorter in both the baseline and treatment night while sleep structure, sleep quality, cognitive performance and visual comfort did not significantly differ. The study shows that dynamic changes in spectrum and intensity of light promote melatonin secretion and sleep initiation in healthy men.  
  Address Transfaculty Research Platform Molecular and Cognitive Neurosciences (MCN), University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:33378563 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3219  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Reiter, R.J.; Sharma, R.; Ma, Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Switching diseased cells from cytosolic aerobic glycolysis to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation: A metabolic rhythm regulated by melatonin? Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res  
  Volume 70 Issue 1 Pages (down) e12677  
  Keywords Commentary; Animals; Human Health; Alzheimer disease; Warburg metabolism; cancer; circadian rhythm; fibrosis; mitochondria  
  Abstract This commentary reviews the concept of the circadian melatonin rhythm playing an essential role in reducing the development of diseases such as solid tumors which adopt cytosolic aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect) to support their enhanced metabolism. Experimental data show that solid mammary tumors depend on aerobic glycolysis during the day but likely revert to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation at night for ATP production. This conversion of diseased cells during the day to a healthier phenotype at night occurs under control of the circulating melatonin rhythm. When the nocturnal melatonin rise is inhibited by light exposure at night, cancer cells function in the diseased state 24/7. The ability of melatonin to switch cancer cells as well as other diseased cells, for example, Alzheimer disease, fibrosis, hyperactivation of macrophages, etc, from aerobic glycolysis to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation may be a basic protective mechanism to reduce pathologies.  
  Address Department of Cell Systems and Anatomy, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32621295 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3221  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Spitschan, M.; Cajochen, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Binocular facilitation in light-mediated melatonin suppression? Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res  
  Volume 67 Issue 4 Pages (down) e12602  
  Keywords Human Health; Vision; melatonin suppression; monocular; binocular  
  Abstract Astronomers and pilots have known for a long time that closing one eye can preserve vision in that eye while going from dark to light and back. Recently, it was reported that viewing a smartphone monocularly in an otherwise dark room can lead to transient, but strong reductions in retinal sensitivity in that eye (Alim-Marvasti, Bi, Mahroo, Barbur, & Plant, 2016). But seeing detail is not the only function that is mediated by the retina. Here, we address the question whether light exposure to one eye only (monocular) has tangible effects on the suppression of melatonin by light, relative to both eyes open (binocular).  
  Address Transfaculty Research Platform Molecular and Cognitive Neurosciences, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31361918 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2595  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Xiang, S.; Dauchy, R.T.; Hoffman, A.E.; Pointer, D.; Frasch, T.; Blask, D.E.; Hill, S.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Epigenetic inhibition of the tumor suppressor ARHI by light at night-induced circadian melatonin disruption mediates STAT3-driven paclitaxel resistance in breast cancer Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res  
  Volume 67 Issue 2 Pages (down) e12586  
  Keywords Animals; Human Health; Circadian Rhythm; Cancer; tumor suppression  
  Abstract Disruption of circadian time structure and suppression of circadian nocturnal melatonin (MLT) production by exposure to dim light at night (dLAN), as occurs with night shift work and/or disturbed sleep-wake cycles, is associated with a significantly increased risk of breast cancer and resistance to tamoxifen and doxorubicin. Melatonin inhibition of human breast cancer chemo-resistance involves mechanisms including suppression of tumor metabolism and inhibition of kinases and transcription factors which are often activated in drug-resistant breast cancer. Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3), frequently overexpressed and activated in Paclitaxel (PTX)-resistant breast cancer, promotes the expression of DNA methyltransferase one (DNMT1) to epigenetically suppresses the transcription of tumor suppressor Aplasia Ras homolog one (ARHI) which can sequester STAT3 in the cytoplasm to block PTX-resistance. We demonstrate that breast tumor xenografts in rats exposed to dLAN and circadian MLT disrupted express elevated levels of phosphorylated and acetylated STAT3, increased DNMT1, but reduced Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and ARHI. Furthermore, MLT and/or SIRT1 administration blocked/reversed Interleukin 6 (IL-6)-induced acetylation of STAT3 and its methylation of ARH1 to increase ARH1 mRNA expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Finally, analyses of the I-SPY 1 trial demonstrates that elevated MT1 receptor expression is significantly correlated with pathologic complete response following neo-adjuvant therapy in breast cancer patients. This is the first study to demonstrate circadian disruption of MLT by dLAN driving intrinsic resistance to PTX via epigenetic mechanisms increasing STAT3 expression and that MLT administration can reestablish sensitivity of breast tumors to PTX and drive tumor regression.  
  Address Tulane Circadian Cancer Biology Group, New Orleans, Louisiana  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31077613 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2383  
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