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Author Boyce, P.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Present and Future of Lighting Research Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication SDAR* Journal of Sustainable Design & Applied Research Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages (up)  
  Keywords Commentary; Lighting; Vision; Human Health  
  Abstract The aim of this paper is to consider where lighting research is today and what its future might be. There is little doubt that, today, lighting research is an active field. A brief review of the topics being studied reveals that they range from residual studies on visibility and visual discomfort, through attempts to identify the influence of lighting on factors beyond visibility such as mood and behaviour, to the whole new field of light and health. But activity alone is not enough to justify a future. For lighting research to have a future it is necessary for it to

be influential. To become influential, research needs to focus its attention on outcomes that matter to people and the elements of those outcomes on which lighting is known to have a major influence. Further, researchers will have to be determined to overcome the barriers to changing lighting practice. By doing this, lighting research may change the world for the better, to be an important topic, not an irrelevance.
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2113  
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Author McGlashan, E.M.; Poudel, G.R.; Vidafar, P.; Drummond, S.P.A.; Cain, S.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Imaging Individual Differences in the Response of the Human Suprachiasmatic Area to Light Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Neurology Abbreviated Journal Front. Neurol.  
  Volume 9 Issue Pages (up)  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Circadian disruption is associated with poor health outcomes, including sleep and mood disorders. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus acts as the master biological clock in mammals, regulating circadian rhythms throughout the body. The clock is synchronized to the day/night cycle via retinal light exposure. The BOLD-fMRI response of the human suprachiasmatic area to light has been shown to be greater in the night than in the day, consistent with the known sensitivity of the clock to light at night. Whether the BOLD-fMRI response of the human suprachiasmatic area to light is related to a functional outcome has not been demonstrated. In a pilot study (n = 10), we investigated suprachiasmatic area activation in response to light in a 30 s block-paradigm of lights on (100 lux) and lights off (< 1 lux) using the BOLD-fMRI response, compared to each participant's melatonin suppression response to moderate indoor light (100 lux). We found a significant correlation between activation in the suprachiasmatic area in response to light in the scanner and melatonin suppression, with increased melatonin suppression being associated with increased suprachiasmatic area activation in response to the same light level. These preliminary findings are a first step toward using imaging techniques to measure individual differences in circadian light sensitivity, a measure that may have clinical relevance in understanding vulnerability in disorders that are influenced by circadian disruption.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1664-2295 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2114  
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Author Tarquini, R.; Carbone, A.; Martinez, M.; Mazzoccoli, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Daylight saving time and circadian rhythms in the neuro-endocrine-immune system: impact on cardiovascular health Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Internal and Emergency Medicine Abbreviated Journal Intern Emerg Med  
  Volume in press Issue Pages (up)  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract  
  Address Division of Internal Medicine and Laboratory of Chronobiology, Department of Medical Sciences, Fondazione IRCCS “Casa Sollievo Della Sofferenza”, Cappuccini Avenue, San Giovanni Rotondo, Foggia, 71013, Italy. g.mazzoccoli@operapadrepio.it  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1828-0447 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30488154 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2121  
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Author Zerbini, G.; Kantermann, T.; Merrow, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Strategies to decrease social jetlag: Reducing evening blue light advances sleep and melatonin Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The European Journal of Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Eur J Neurosci  
  Volume in press Issue Pages (up)  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract The timing of sleep is under the control of the circadian clock, which uses light to entrain to the external light-dark cycle. A combination of genetic, physiological and environmental factors produces individual differences in chronotype (entrained phase as manifest in sleep timing). A mismatch between circadian and societal (e.g., work) clocks leads to a condition called social jetlag, which is characterized by changing sleep times over work and free days and accumulation of sleep debt. Social jetlag, which is prevalent in late chronotypes, has been related to several health issues. One way to reduce social jetlag would be to advance the circadian clock via modifications of the light environment. We thus performed two intervention field studies to describe methods for decreasing social jetlag. One study decreased evening light exposure (via blue-light-blocking glasses) and the other used increased morning light (via the use of curtains). We measured behaviour as well as melatonin; the latter in order to validate that behaviour was consistent with this neuroendocrinological phase marker of the circadian clock. We found that a decrease in evening blue light exposure led to an advance in melatonin and sleep onset on workdays. Increased morning light exposure advanced neither melatonin secretion nor sleep timing. Neither protocol led to a significant change in social jetlag. Despite this, our findings show that controlling light exposure at home can be effective in advancing melatonin secretion and sleep, thereby helping late chronotypes to better cope with early social schedules.  
  Address Institute of Medical Psychology, LMU Munich, Munich, Germany  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0953-816X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30506899 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2138  
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Author Kyba, C.C.M.; Spitschan, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Comment on 'Domestic light at night and breast cancer risk: a prospective analysis of 105000 UK women in the Generations Study' Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication British Journal of Cancer Abbreviated Journal Br J Cancer  
  Volume in press Issue Pages (up)  
  Keywords Human Health; Commentary  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0007-0920 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30584260 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2145  
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