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Author Benedetto, M.M.; Contin, M.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Oxidative Stress in Retinal Degeneration Promoted by Constant LED Light Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Front. Cell. Neurosci.  
  Volume 13 Issue Pages (up)  
  Keywords Vision; Human Health  
  Abstract Light pollution by artificial light, might accelerate retinal diseases and circadian asynchrony. The excess of light exposure is a growing problem in societies, so studies on the consequences of long-term exposure to low levels of light are needed to determine the effects on vision. The possibility to understand the molecular mechanisms of light damage will contribute to the knowledge about visual disorders related to defects in the phototransduction. Several animal models have been used to study retinal degeneration (RD) by light; however, some important aspects remain to be established. Previously, we demonstrated that cool white treatment of 200 lux light-emitting diode (LED) induces retinal transformation with rods and cones cell death and significant changes in opsin expression in the inner nuclear layer (INL) and ganglion cell layer (GCL). Therefore, to further develop describing the molecular pathways of RD, we have examined here the oxidative stress and the fatty acid composition in rat retinas maintained at constant light. We demonstrated the existence of oxidative reactions after 5 days in outer nuclear layer (ONL), corresponding to classical photoreceptors; catalase (CAT) enzyme activity did not show significant differences in all times studied and the fatty acid study showed that docosahexaenoic acid decreased after 4 days. Remarkably, the docosahexaenoic acid diminution showed a correlation with the rise in stearic acid indicating a possible association between them. We assumed that the reduction in docosahexaenoic acid may be affected by the oxidative stress in photoreceptors outer segment which in turn affects the stearic acid composition with consequences in the membrane properties. All these miss-regulation affects the photoreceptor survival through unknown mechanisms involved. We consider that oxidative stress might be one of the pathways implicated in RD promoted by light.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1662-5102 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2333  
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Author Anbalagan, M.; Dauchy, R.; Xiang, S.; Robling, A.; Blask, D.; Rowan, B.; Hill, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title SAT-337 Disruption Of The Circadian Melatonin Signal By Dim Light At Night Promotes Bone-lytic Breast Cancer Metastases Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of the Endocrine Society Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 3 Issue Supplement_1 Pages (up)  
  Keywords Human Health; Cancer; Breast cancer; melatonin; shift work; mouse models  
  Abstract Breast cancer metastasis to bone is a major source of morbidity and mortality in women with advanced metastatic breast cancer. Morbidity from metastasis to bone is compounded by the fact that they cannot be surgically removed and can only be treated with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. Thus, there is critical need to develop new treatment strategies that kill bone metastatic tumors and reduce osteolytic lesions to improve patient quality of life and extend patient survival. Circadian rhythms are daily cycles of ~24 h that control many if not most physiologic processes and their disruption by exposure to light at night (LAN) or jet lag has been shown to be strongly associated with the development of cancer, particularly breast cancer. We have found that disruption of the anti-cancer circadian hormone melatonin (MLT) by light at night can significantly enhance the metastatic potential in breast cancer cells. Our work supports the report of the International Agency for Research on Cancer that shift work is a “probable human carcinogen” and highlights the association between exposure to light at night and invasive breast cancer. We recently reported that human breast tumor xenografts grown in athymic nude female rats housed in a photoperiod of 12h light at day: 12h dim light at night (dLAN, 0.2 lux – blocks the nighttime circadian MLT signal), display resistance to doxorubicin (Dox). More importantly, tumor growth and drug resistance could be blocked by the administration of Dox in circadian alignment with nocturnal MLT during dLAN. Our recent preliminary studies show that poorly invasive ERα positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells, when injected into the tibia (to mimic bone metastatic disease) of Foxn1nu athymic nude mice (which produce a strong circadian nighttime melatonin signal) housed in a dLAN photoperiod (suppressed nocturnal MLT production) developed full blown breast cancer tumors in bone (P<0.05) that are highly osteolytic (P<0.05). Moreover, patients with metastatic breast cancer are routinely treated with doxorubicin, which itself can promote bone damage. Our studies demonstrate that MLT slows the growth of metastatic breast cancer in bone but that the chrono-therapeutic use of doxorubicin in circadian alignment with melatonin in Foxn1nu mice with tibial breast tumors, reduced tumor growth in bone, reduced bone erosion, and promoted the formation of new bone. Successful use of this chronotherapeutic use of Dox and MLT in clinical trials increasing efficacy in preventing or suppressing breast cancer metastasis to bone while decreasing toxic side effects of doxorubicin would provide a revolutionary advancement in the treatment of bone metastatic breast cancer and decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with breast cancer metastasis to bone.  
  Address Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, United States  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Oxford Academic Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2472-1972 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2433  
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Author Sankhla, M., S., Sharma, K., & Kumar, R. url  openurl
  Title Impacts on Human & Environment of Night Time Light Pollution Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Galore International Journal of Applied Sciences and Humanities Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 3 Issue 2 Pages (up)  
  Keywords Human Health; Ecology; Review  
  Abstract Light is chief source of human life. Humans are too much depended on light. High amount of use light are causing pollution to be a growing problem, however few research studies have addressed probable effects of light pollution on wildlife& humans. Astrophysicists consider light pollution to be a growing problem on worldwide. The night-sky illumination is originated to be effected by human factors such as land utilization and population density of the observation sites, together with meteorological and/or environmental factors. The interest in light pollution has been growing in many fields of science, extending from the traditional field of astronomy to atmospheric physics, environmental sciences, natural sciences and human sciences.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2543  
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Author Simons, K. S., van den Boogaard, M., & de Jager, C. P. C. url  openurl
  Title Impact of intensive care unit light and noise exposure on critically ill patients Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Neth j crit care Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages (up)  
  Keywords Human Health; Review  
  Abstract Recently, the importance of the ICU environment as a potential modifiable factor for improvement of patient care has become more clear. In this review, we describe the effects of light and noise exposure on ICU patients. In ICU patients circadian rhythms and sleep are severely disturbed, which may increase the risk of delirium. Realignment of circadian rhythmicity by means of artificial light therapy has not been shown to reduce the incidence or duration of delirium. Prudent use of nighttime light may be a first step in improvement of patient sleep. Eye masks appear to improve sleep although they are only applicable for a selected group of patients. Noise levels in the ICU are above recommended standards. Negative effects include disturbances of sleep, as often encountered in ICU patients. Staff activity and talking contribute substantially to the total acoustic energy, providing opportunities to adapt behaviour and/or workflow in order to reduce noise pollution.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2624  
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Author Sletten, T.L.; Cappuccio, F.P.; Davidson, A.J.; Van Cauter, E.; Rajaratnam, S.M.W.; Scheer, F.A.J.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Health consequences of circadian disruption Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Sleep Abbreviated Journal Sleep  
  Volume 43 Issue 1 Pages (up)  
  Keywords Human Health; Circadian Rhythm; Chronobiology; Sleep; Review  
  Abstract The circadian system is key for optimal functioning by maintaining synchrony between internal circadian rhythms, behaviors, and external cues. Many clinicians are not fully aware, however, of the far-reaching implications of the circadian system for human health. Clinical attention to circadian rhythms has largely focused on sleep disturbances. The impact of the circadian system on health is, however, much broader. Clinical diagnoses are often based on single time point assessments during the day, ignoring circadian influences on physiology. Even when time is considered, using (external) clock time ignores the large interindividual differences in internal timing.  
  Address Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0161-8105 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31930347 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2822  
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