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Author Fonken, L.K.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of light exposure at night during development Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences Abbreviated Journal Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences  
  Volume 7 Issue Pages 33-39  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Disruption of the circadian system is increasingly prevalent in modern society. The mammalian circadian architecture is functional from birth and continues to develop throughout the early postnatal period. Importantly, light is the most salient entraining signal for the circadian system. Early life experiences can profoundly affect the developing brain, influencing adult behavior, health, and disease; thus, the immature circadian system may be particularly sensitive to circadian disruption. Indeed, early lighting environment impacts the maturation of the circadian system. The consequences of early light experience persist into adulthood influencing physiological and behavioral functions that are regulated by the circadian system. This review will discuss the development of the mammalian circadian system and implications of disruptive light exposure during early critical periods.  
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  ISSN (down) 2352-1546 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1292  
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Author Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Bará, S.; Aubé, M.; Cardiel, N.; Tapia, C.E.; Zamorano, J.; Gaston, K.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluating Human Photoreceptoral Inputs from Night-Time Lights Using RGB Imaging Photometry Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Imaging Abbreviated Journal J. Imaging  
  Volume 5 Issue 4 Pages 49  
  Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing; Instrumentation  
  Abstract Night-time lights interact with human physiology through different pathways starting at the retinal layers of the eye; from the signals provided by the rods; the S-, L- and M-cones; and the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGC). These individual photic channels combine in complex ways to modulate important physiological processes, among them the daily entrainment of the neural master oscillator that regulates circadian rhythms. Evaluating the relative excitation of each type of photoreceptor generally requires full knowledge of the spectral power distribution of the incoming light, information that is not easily available in many practical applications. One such instance is wide area sensing of public outdoor lighting; present-day radiometers onboard Earth-orbiting platforms with sufficient nighttime sensitivity are generally panchromatic and lack the required spectral discrimination capacity. In this paper, we show that RGB imagery acquired with off-the-shelf digital single-lens reflex cameras (DSLR) can be a useful tool to evaluate, with reasonable accuracy and high angular resolution, the photoreceptoral inputs associated with a wide range of lamp technologies. The method is based on linear regressions of these inputs against optimum combinations of the associated R, G, and B signals, built for a large set of artificial light sources by means of synthetic photometry. Given the widespread use of RGB imaging devices, this approach is expected to facilitate the monitoring of the physiological effects of light pollution, from ground and space alike, using standard imaging technology.  
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  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (down) 2313-433X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2294  
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Author Chaput, J.-P.; Weippert, M.; LeBlanc, A.G.; Hjorth, M.F.; Michaelsen, K.F.; Katzmarzyk, P.T.; Tremblay, M.S.; Barreira, T.V.; Broyles, S.T.; Fogelholm, M.; Hu, G.; Kuriyan, R.; Kurpad, A.; Lambert, E.V.; Maher, C.; Maia, J.; Matsudo, V.; Olds, T.; Onywera, V.; Sarmiento, O.L.; Standage, M.; Tudor-Locke, C.; Zhao, P.; Sjodin, A.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Are Children Like Werewolves? Full Moon and Its Association with Sleep and Activity Behaviors in an International Sample of Children Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Frontiers in Pediatrics Abbreviated Journal Front Pediatr  
  Volume 4 Issue Pages 24  
  Keywords Human Health; Moonlight  
  Abstract In order to verify if the full moon is associated with sleep and activity behaviors, we used a 12-country study providing 33,710 24-h accelerometer recordings of sleep and activity. The present observational, cross-sectional study included 5812 children ages 9-11 years from study sites that represented all inhabited continents and wide ranges of human development (Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, Finland, India, Kenya, Portugal, South Africa, United Kingdom, and United States). Three moon phases were used in this analysis: full moon (+/-4 days; reference), half moon (+/-5-9 days), and new moon (+/-10-14 days) from nearest full moon. Nocturnal sleep duration, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), light-intensity physical activity (LPA), and total sedentary time (SED) were monitored over seven consecutive days using a waist-worn accelerometer worn 24 h a day. Only sleep duration was found to significantly differ between moon phases (~5 min/night shorter during full moon compared to new moon). Differences in MVPA, LPA, and SED between moon phases were negligible and non-significant (<2 min/day difference). There was no difference in the associations between study sites. In conclusion, sleep duration was 1% shorter at full moon compared to new moon, while activity behaviors were not significantly associated with the lunar cycle in this global sample of children. Whether this seemingly minimal difference is clinically meaningful is questionable.  
  Address University of Copenhagen , Copenhagen , Denmark  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (down) 2296-2360 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27047907; PMCID:PMC4805596 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1556  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Daneshmandi, M.; Neiseh, F.; SadeghiShermeh, M.; Ebadi, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of eye mask on sleep quality in patients with acute coronary syndrome Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Caring Sciences Abbreviated Journal J Caring Sci  
  Volume 1 Issue 3 Pages 135-143  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Sleep is one of the basic human needs and sleep deprivation causes nu-merous adverse effects on the human body and mind. Due to reduced sleep quality in patients with acute coronary syndrome, this study was carried out to determine the effect of eye mask on sleep quality in patients with acute coronary syndrome. METHODS: In this two-group controlled clinical trial, sixty patients with acute coronary syndrome in the coronary care units of Baqiyatallah Hospital in Tehran in 2010 were selected by purposeful sampling method and randomly allocated to two groups of case and control. In the case group, in the second night stay, the intervention of eye mask was done per night and by using the Petersburg's sleep quality index; sleep quality was evaluated during and at the end of hospitalization. Then data were analyzed by paired t-test, independent t-test, Spearman and Pearson's correlation coefficient and SPSS software version 19. RESULTS: Total sleep quality score of the case group was significantly decreased after intervention (4.86 +/- 1.88) from before intervention (10.46 +/- 4.09) (p < 0.000). In addi-tion, total score of sleep quality after intervention in the case group (4.86 +/- 1.88) was significant different from the control group (8.43 +/- 1.97) (p < 0.005). CONCLUSION: Using eye mask, as an economical and uncomplicated method, can improve sleep quality in patients with acute coronary syndrome in the coronary care units and can be used as an alternative method of treatment instead of drug therapy.  
  Address PhD ,Assistant Professor, Department of Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (down) 2251-9920 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:25276688; PMCID:PMC4161075 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2252  
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Author Nelson, R.J.; DeVries, A.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Medical Hypothesis: Light at Night Is a Factor Worth Considering in Critical Care Units Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Advances in Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal Advances in Integrative Medicine  
  Volume 4 Issue 3 Pages 115-120  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Exposure to light at night is not an innocuous consequence of modernization. There are compelling data linking long-term exposure to occupational and environmental light at night with serious health conditions, including heart disease, obesity, diabetes, and cancer. However, far less is known about the physiological and behavioral effects of acute exposure to light at night. Among healthy volunteers, acute night-time light exposure increases systolic blood pressure and inflammatory markers in the blood, and impairs glucose regulation. Whether critically ill patients in a hospital setting experience the same physiological shifts in response to evening light exposure is not known. This paper reviews the available data on light at night effects on health and wellbeing, and argues that the data are sufficiently compelling to warrant studies of how lighting in intensive care units may be influencing patient recovery.  
  Address  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (down) 2212-9588 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1794  
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