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Author Hersh, C.; Sisti, J.; Richiutti, V.; Schernhammer, E. url  openurl
  Title The effects of sleep and light at night on melatonin in adolescents Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Hormones Abbreviated Journal Hormones  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Human Health; melatonin; circadian rhythm; 6-sulfatoxymelatonin; artificial light at night  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The circadian hormone melatonin has wide-reaching effects on human physiology. In adolescents, the impact of nighttime light exposure and other modifiable behavioral factors on melatonin levels is poorly understood.

DESIGN: We cross-sectionally examined the influence of nighttime behaviors on melatonin levels in 100 adolescents (average age: 15.7; 55 female, 45 male), who completed a self-administered questionnaire and provided a first morning urine sample to assay for urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) levels. We used mixed-effects regression models to test for differences in aMT6s levels by categories of covariates.

RESULTS: Self-reported sleep duration, ambient light levels during sleep, and use of electronics after turning off lights did not significantly predict aMT6s levels. Compared to those who reported weekend bedtimes before 11pm, urinary aMT6s levels were significantly lower among participants reporting weekend bedtimes after midnight (52.5 vs. 38.0 ng/mg creatinine, Ptrend=0.007). Sleep interruption also appeared to be significantly associated with lower urinary aMT6s levels, but only if lights were turned on during sleep interruption (43.0 ng/mg creatinine for participants with sleep interruption but not turning lights on, vs. 24.6 ng/mg creatinine for participants reporting that they turned on the light when their sleep was interrupted Pdifference=0.032).



CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that self-reported sleep-related behaviors have little to no effect on adolescent circadian systems, though larger studies are needed to confirm our findings.
 
  Address Julia Sisti, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA, Tel.: (201) 694-2077, E-mail: jss235@mail.harvard.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Greek Endocrine Society Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1215  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kyba, C.C.M.; Kantermann, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Does ambient light at night reduce total melatonin production? Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Hormones Abbreviated Journal Hormones  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Human Health; melatonin; ambient lighting; indoor light; sleep; *Circadian Rhythm; chronotype  
  Abstract It was with great interest that we read the recent study by Hersh et al on the effects of sleep and light at night on melatonin in adolescents. Of particular interest was their focus on electronic use after “lights out”. The authors highlight the importance of understanding what effects this may have on sleep, citing a survey that showed that 72% of American 13-18 year olds regularly use a cellphone or computer before trying to go to sleep. In their study, Hersh et al1 did not observe a significant suppression in urinary morning melatonin (aMT6s) levels with respect to the use of electronic devices between lights off and sleep onset. Therefore, the authors conclude that “nighttime behaviors of adolescents by and large do not impact urinary melatonin levels”. Absence of evidence, however, is not the same as evidence of absence, and we believe that the authors’ conclusion is premature.  
  Address Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum GFZ, Telegraphenberg, 14473 Potsdam, Germany; kyba(at)gfz-potsdam.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Hellenic Endocrine Society Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1236  
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Author Sun, C.; Lian, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sensitive physiological indicators for human visual comfort evaluation Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Res. & Tech.  
  Volume 48 Issue 6 Pages 726-741  
  Keywords Human health; human vision; Melatonin  
  Abstract Three physiological factors (melatonin levels, tear mucus ferning quality and degree of asthenopia) were examined for their relationship to visual comfort. A lighting environment was created where the illuminance, illuminance uniformity and correlated colour temperature could be adjusted. A three-factor and three-level orthogonal experiment with 24 subjects was designed and carried out. The results indicated that the selected environmental factors had different impacts on the physiological factors. With the illuminance increasing, the melatonin level decreased significantly and the tear mucus ferning quality was improved. However, there is no general influence of illuminance uniformity and correlated colour temperature on the physiological parameters, only differential effects among the three levels were found.  
  Address Zhiwei Lian, Department of Architecture, School of Naval Architecture, Ocean & Civil Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240, PR China; zwlian(at)sjtu.edu.cn  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher SAGE Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1333  
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Author Kim, Y.J.; Park, M.S.; Lee, E.; Choi, J.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title High Incidence of Breast Cancer in Light-Polluted Areas with Spatial Effects in Korea Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Asian Pacific Journal for Cancer Prevention Abbreviated Journal Asian Pac J Cancer Prev  
  Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 361-367  
  Keywords Human Health; Light pollution; breast cancer; spatial analysis; intrinsic conditional autoregressive model  
  Abstract We have reported a high prevalence of breast cancer in light-polluted areas in Korea. However, it is necessary to analyze the spatial effects of light polluted areas on breast cancer because light pollution levels are correlated with region proximity to central urbanized areas in studied cities. In this study, we applied a spatial regression method (an intrinsic conditional autoregressive [iCAR] model) to analyze the relationship between the incidence of breast cancer and artificial light at night (ALAN) levels in 25 regions including central city, urbanized, and rural areas. By Poisson regression analysis, there was a significant correlation between ALAN, alcohol consumption rates, and the incidence of breast cancer. We also found significant spatial effects between ALAN and the incidence of breast cancer, with an increase in the deviance information criterion (DIC) from 374.3 to 348.6 and an increase in R² from 0.574 to 0.667. Therefore, spatial analysis (an iCAR model) is more appropriate for assessing ALAN effects on breast cancer. To our knowledge, this study is the first to show spatial effects of light pollution on breast cancer, despite the limitations of an ecological study. We suggest that a decrease in ALAN could reduce breast cancer more than expected because of spatial effects.  
  Address Department of Preventive Medicine, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul, Korea; eunil(at)korea.ac.kr.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Asian Pacific Organization for Cancer Prevention Place of Publication Korea Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1362  
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Author Scheffler, T.; Kyba, C.C.M. url  openurl
  Title Measuring Social Jetlag in Twitter Data Type Conference Article
  Year 2016 Publication Proceedings of the Tenth International AAAI Conference on Web and Social Media (ICWSM 2016) Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 675-678  
  Keywords Human Health; Sunlight; Society  
  Abstract Social constraints have replaced the natural cycle of light and darkness as the main determinant of wake-up and activity times for many people. In this paper we show how Twitter activity can be used as a source of large-scale, naturally occurring data for the study of circadian rhythm in humans. Our year-long initial study is based on almost 1.5 million observations by over 200,000 users. The progression of the onset of Twitter activity times on free days in the course of the year is consistent with previous survey-based research on wake

times. We show that the difference in wake-up time (implicating lack of sleep) on weekdays compared to Sundays is between 1 hour and over 2 hours depending on the time of year. The data also supports the assertion that Daylight Saving Time greatly disrupts the easing of social jetlag in the Spring transition.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference ICWSM 2016  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1453  
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