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Author Schernhammer, E.S.; Schulmeister, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Melatonin and cancer risk: does light at night compromise physiologic cancer protection by lowering serum melatonin levels? Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication (up) British Journal of Cancer Abbreviated Journal Br J Cancer  
  Volume 90 Issue 5 Pages 941-943  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Circadian Rhythm/*radiation effects; Humans; Light/*adverse effects; Melatonin/*blood; Neoplasms/blood/*etiology; Risk Factors  
  Abstract The suprachiasmatic nuclei in the hypothalamus, one of the most important physiological determinants of alertness and performance, drive a circadian pacemaker in mammals, with an intrinsic period averaging 24 h. Light is the primary stimulus to the disruption and resetting of this pacemaker, which is expressed in changing melatonin rhythms. Melatonin production in humans decreases when people are exposed to light at night. Since melatonin shows potential oncostatic action in a variety of tumours, it is possible that lowered serum melatonin levels caused by exposure to light at night enhance the general tumour development. Cancer is the second leading cause of death in industrialised countries like the United States, where a significant proportion of workers engage in shift work, making a hypothesised relation between light exposure at night and cancer risk relevant. Observational studies support an association between night work and cancer risk. We hypothesise that the potential primary culprit for this observed association is the lack of melatonin, a cancer-protective agent whose production is severely diminished in people exposed to light at night.  
  Address Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. eva.schernhammer@channing.harvard.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0007-0920 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:14997186; PMCID:PMC2409637 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 805  
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Author Johns, L.E.; Jones, M.E.; Schoemaker, M.J.; McFadden, E.; Ashworth, A.; Swerdlow, A.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Domestic light at night and breast cancer risk: a prospective analysis of 105 000 UK women in the Generations Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication (up) British Journal of Cancer Abbreviated Journal Br J Cancer  
  Volume 118 Issue Pages 600-606  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Circadian disruption caused by exposure to light at night (LAN) has been proposed as a risk factor for breast cancer and a reason for secular increases in incidence. Studies to date have largely been ecological or case-control in design and findings have been mixed. METHODS: We investigated the relationship between LAN and breast cancer risk in the UK Generations Study. Bedroom light levels and sleeping patterns at age 20 and at study recruitment were obtained by questionnaire. Analyses were conducted on 105 866 participants with no prior history of breast cancer. During an average of 6.1 years of follow-up, 1775 cases of breast cancer were diagnosed. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs), adjusting for potential confounding factors. RESULTS: There was no association between LAN level and breast cancer risk overall (highest compared with lowest LAN level at recruitment: HR=1.01, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.88-1.15), or for invasive (HR=0.98, 95% CI: 0.85-1.13) or in situ (HR=0.96, 95% CI: 0.83-1.11) breast cancer, or oestrogen-receptor (ER) positive (HR=0.98, 95% CI: 0.84-1.14); or negative (HR=1.16, 95% CI: 0.82-1.65) tumours separately. The findings did not differ by menopausal status. Adjusting for sleep duration, sleeping at unusual times (non-peak sleep) and history of night work did not affect the results. Night waking with exposure to light, occurring around age 20, was associated with a reduced risk of premenopausal breast cancer (HR for breast cancer overall=0.74, 95% CI: 0.55-0.99; HR for ER-positive breast cancer=0.69, 95% CI: 0.49-0.97). CONCLUSIONS: In this prospective cohort analysis of LAN, there was no evidence that LAN exposure increased the risk of subsequent breast cancer, although the suggestion of a lower breast cancer risk in pre-menopausal women with a history of night waking in their twenties may warrant further investigation.British Journal of Cancer advance online publication, 23 January 2018; doi:10.1038/bjc.2017.359 www.bjcancer.com.  
  Address Division of Breast Cancer Research, The Institute of Cancer Research, London SW3 6JB, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0007-0920 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29360812 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1803  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Stevens, R.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Comment on 'Domestic light at night and breast cancer risk: a prospective analysis of 105 000 UK women in the Generations Study' Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication (up) British Journal of Cancer Abbreviated Journal Br J Cancer  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Commentary; Human Health  
  Abstract  
  Address University of Connecticut, School of Medicine, 263 Farmington Avenue, Farmington, CT, 06032, USA. bugs@uchc.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0007-0920 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30283145 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2035  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kyba, C.C.M.; Spitschan, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Comment on 'Domestic light at night and breast cancer risk: a prospective analysis of 105000 UK women in the Generations Study' Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication (up) British Journal of Cancer Abbreviated Journal Br J Cancer  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Human Health; Commentary  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0007-0920 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30584260 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2145  
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Author Mormont, M.-C.; Levi, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Cancer chronotherapy: principles, applications, and perspectives Type Journal Article
  Year 2003 Publication (up) Cancer Abbreviated Journal Cancer  
  Volume 97 Issue 1 Pages 155-169  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/*administration & dosage; Chronobiology Phenomena; *Chronotherapy; Colorectal Neoplasms/*drug therapy; Drug Tolerance; Humans; Models, Biological; Prognosis; Quality of Life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cell physiology is regulated along the 24-hour timescale by a circadian clock, which is comprised of interconnected molecular loops involving at least nine genes. The cellular clocks are coordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus, a hypothalamic pacemaker that also helps the organism adjust to environmental cycles. The rest-activity rhythm is a reliable marker of the circadian system function in both rodents and humans. This circadian organization is responsible for predictable changes in the tolerability and efficacy of anticancer agents, and possibly also may be involved in tumor promotion or growth. METHODS: Expected least toxic times of chemotherapy were extrapolated from experimental models to human subjects with reference to the rest-activity cycle. The clinical relevance of the chronotherapy principle (i.e., treatment administration as a function of rhythms) has been investigated previously in randomized multicenter trials. RESULTS: In the current study, chronotherapeutic schedules were used to safely document activity of the combination of oxaliplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and leucovorin against metastatic colorectal carcinoma and to establish new medicosurgical management for this disease, and were reported to result in unprecedented long-term survival. CONCLUSIONS: Chronotherapy concepts appear to offer further potential to improve current cancer treatment options as well as to optimize the development of new anticancer or supportive agents.  
  Address EPI 0118 INSERM Chronotherapeutique des cancers and Service de Cancerologie, Hopital Paul Brousse (I.C.I.G), 94800 Villejuif Cedex, France  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0008-543X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:12491517 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 785  
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