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Author Shen, J.; Tower, J.
Title Effects of light on aging and longevity Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Ageing Research Reviews Abbreviated Journal Ageing Res Rev
Volume 53 Issue Pages 100913
Keywords Human Health; Review; Aging; longevity
Abstract Increasing evidence suggests an important role for light in regulation of aging and longevity. UV radiation is a mutagen that can promote aging and decrease longevity. In contrast, NIR light has shown protective effects in animal disease models. In invertebrates, visible light can shorten or extend lifespan, depending on the intensity and wavelength composition. Visible light also impacts human health, including retina function, sleep, cancer and psychiatric disorders. Possible mechanisms of visible light include: controlling circadian rhythms, inducing oxidative stress, and acting through the retina to affect neuronal circuits and systems. Changes in artificial lighting (e.g., LEDs) may have implications for human health. It will be important to further explore the mechanisms of how light affects aging and longevity, and how light affects human health.
Address Molecular and Computational Biology Program, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles CA 90089-2910, United States
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ISSN 1568-1637 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31154014 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2514
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Author Stevens, R.G.
Title Electric power use and breast cancer: a hypothesis. Type Journal Article
Year 1987 Publication (up) Am J Epidemiol Abbreviated Journal
Volume 125 Issue Pages 556-561
Keywords Human Health
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Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 533
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Author Bhatti, P.; Mirick, D.K.; Davis, S.
Title Invited commentary: Shift work and cancer Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication (up) American Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Am J Epidemiol
Volume 176 Issue 9 Pages 760-3; discussion 764-5
Keywords Human Health; Circadian Rhythm; Humans; Male; *Men's Health; Neoplasms/*epidemiology; Occupations/*statistics & numerical data; Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/*statistics & numerical data
Abstract In this issue of the Journal, Parent et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2012;176(9):751-759) report significant associations between night-shift work and risk of cancer at several sites among men. These findings not only address the need for shift-work studies that evaluate cancers other than breast and prostate cancer but also support the increasing concern that the negative effects of shift work may be broadly applicable to risk of many cancers via the direct oncostatic properties of melatonin. Studies of shift work have been limited by a lack of detailed data for determining which aspects of this multifaceted exposure may be associated with increased cancer risk. Additionally, the influence of individual-level characteristics, such as preference for daytime activity versus nighttime activity or chronotype, has not been considered. In moving forward, launching new cohort studies of shift work and cancer risk is the most tenable approach, though it will be limited by the years of follow-up required in order to accrue adequate numbers of cancer cases. Studies incorporating biomarkers of effect are useful for providing immediate information that can aid not only in identifying the underlying mechanisms of the shift-work-cancer association but also in interpreting existing epidemiologic data and informing the design of future epidemiologic studies of cancer risk.
Address Program in Epidemiology, Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. pbhatti@fhcrc.org
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0002-9262 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23035018 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 507
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Author Hasler, B.P.
Title Commentary on Bedroom Light Exposure at Night and the Incidence of Depressive Symptoms: A Longitudinal Study of the HEIJOKYO Cohort (Obayashi et al) Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) American Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 187 Issue 3 Pages 435-438
Keywords Commentary; Human Health
Abstract In modern society, we are increasingly disconnected from natural light/dark cycles and beset by round-the-clock exposure to artificial light. Light has powerful effects on physical and mental health, in part via the circadian system, and thus the timing of light exposure dictates whether it is helpful or harmful. In their compelling paper, Obayashi and colleagues offer evidence that light at night can prospectively predict an elevated incidence of depressive symptoms in older adults. Strengths of the study include the longitudinal design and direct, objective assessment of light levels, as well as accounting for multiple plausible confounders during analyses. Follow-up studies should address the study's limitations, including reliance on a global self-report of sleep quality and a two-night assessment of light exposure that may not reliably represent typical light exposure. In addition, experimental studies including physiological circadian measures will be necessary to determine if the light effects on depression are mediated through the circadian system or are so-called “direct” effects of light. In any case, these exciting findings could inform novel new approaches to preventing depressive disorders in older adults.
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ISSN 0002-9262 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1716
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Author Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Kurumatani, N.
Title Obayashi et al. Respond to “Light at Night Predicts Depression—What Next?” Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) American Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 187 Issue 3 Pages 439-440
Keywords Commentary; Human Health
Abstract Our research includes some strengths and limitations. The most important strength is objective measurement of light at night (LAN) intensity using a bedside light meter. Most previous studies evaluating the association between LAN and health outcomes have assessed indoor LAN levels using a self-reported questionnaire or outdoor LAN levels using satellite data; however, self-reported indoor LAN levels has not yet been validated with objective measurement and outdoor LAN levels are surrogates for an individual LAN exposure. The second strength of our study includes its longitudinal design using multivariable methods to adjust for confounders, which indicated LAN exposure may be a cause of the incidence of depressive symptoms. Indeed, the depressive score evaluated by questionnaires may be above or below the cut-off value over the short term; therefore, a long-term study considering such unstable outcomes should be conducted. In the current study, LAN exposure was measured for only two nights; thus, an amplitude of LAN intensity has been focused. However, multiple measurements over time in the future study would allow an analysis of fluctuations in LAN exposure, which might be important for circadian physiology.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0002-9262 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1717
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