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Author Takemura, Y.; Ito, M.; Shimizu, Y.; Okano, K.; Okano, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Adaptive light: a lighting control method aligned with dark adaptation of human vision Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 11204  
  Keywords Human Health; Vision; Lighting  
  Abstract Light exposure before sleep causes a reduction in the quality and duration of sleep. In order to reduce these detrimental effects of light exposure, it is important to dim the light. However, dimming the light often causes inconvenience and can lower the quality of life (QOL). We therefore aimed to develop a lighting control method for use before going to bed, in which the illuminance of lights can be ramped down with less of a subjective feeling of changes in illuminance. We performed seven experiments in a double-blind, randomized crossover design. In each experiment, we compared two lighting conditions. We examined constant illuminance, linear dimming, and three monophasic and three biphasic exponential dimming, to explore the fast and slow increases in visibility that reflect the dark adaptation of cone and rod photoreceptors in the retina, respectively. Finally, we developed a biphasic exponential dimming method termed Adaptive Light 1.0. Adaptive Light 1.0 significantly prevented the misidentification seen in constant light and effectively suppressed perceptions of the illuminance change. This novel lighting method will help to develop new intelligent lighting instruments that reduce the negative effect of light on sleep and also lower energy consumption.  
  Address The Smart Life Science Institute, ACROSS, Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan. okano@waseda.jp  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32641723; PMCID:PMC7343865 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3050  
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Author Park, H.R.; Choi, S.J.; Jo, H.; Cho, J.W.; Joo, E.Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Evening Exposure to Light from Organic Light-Emitting Diodes on Melatonin and Sleep Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Clinical Neurology Abbreviated Journal J Clin Neurol  
  Volume 16 Issue 3 Pages 401  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Background and Purpose

Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) emit less blue light than traditional light-emitting diodes (LEDs), but the effects of OLED light exposure (LE) on melatonin and sleep have not been evaluated.

Methods

Twenty-four healthy subjects (age 26.9±5.7 years; including 18 females) with the intermediate chronotype were exposed to three different light conditions [4,000 K 150 lux OLED LE, 4,000 K 150 lux LED LE, and dim light (DL) at <10 lux] for 6.5 h from 17:30 to 24:00, in a random order and with a 1-week interval. Participants entered the unit for the experiment at 16:00, and their daylight was measured by actigraphy from 8:00 to 16:00 during each session. Saliva samples for melatonin were taken every hour from 18:00 to 24:00. Sleep was monitored by polysomnography, and vigilance was evaluated by psychomotor vigilance test upon awakening.

Results

Melatonin onset occurred at 21:11±01:24, 21:20±01:19, and 21:36±01:16 in the DL, OLED, and LED conditions, respectively. Melatonin onset was significantly delayed under LED LE compared to DL (p=0.007) but did not differ under OLED LE (p=0.245). Melatonin suppression, sleep parameters, and vigilance were similar among the three light conditions. The accumulated amount of daytime light in each session was negatively correlated with the melatonin onset time under the DL (rho=−0.634, p=0.002) and OLED (rho=−0.447, p=0.029) conditions, not under the LED condition (p=0.129).

Conclusions

Melatonin onset under OLED LE was not significantly delayed compared to DL. Exposure to sufficient daylight may advance melatonin onset even when a subject is exposed to OLED LE in the evening.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1738-6586 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3046  
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Author Garcia-Saenz, A.; Sanchez de Miguel, A.; Espinosa, A.; Valentin, A.; Aragones, N.; Llorca, J.; Amiano, P.; Martin Sanchez, V.; Guevara, M.; Capelo, R.; Tardon, A.; Peiro-Perez, R.; Jimenez-Moleon, J.J.; Roca-Barcelo, A.; Perez-Gomez, B.; Dierssen-Sotos, T.; Fernandez-Villa, T.; Moreno-Iribas, C.; Moreno, V.; Garcia-Perez, J.; Castano-Vinyals, G.; Pollan, M.; Aube, M.; Kogevinas, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluating the Association between Artificial Light-at-Night Exposure and Breast and Prostate Cancer Risk in Spain (MCC-Spain Study) Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Environmental Health Perspectives Abbreviated Journal Environ Health Perspect  
  Volume 126 Issue 4 Pages 047011  
  Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Breast Neoplasms/*epidemiology/etiology; Case-Control Studies; Circadian Rhythm; Female; Humans; Incidence; Light/*adverse effects; Lighting/*adverse effects; Male; Middle Aged; Prostatic Neoplasms/*epidemiology/etiology; Risk Factors; Spain/epidemiology; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Night shift work, exposure to light at night (ALAN) and circadian disruption may increase the risk of hormone-dependent cancers. OBJECTIVES: We evaluated the association of exposure to ALAN during sleeping time with breast and prostate cancer in a population based multicase-control study (MCC-Spain), among subjects who had never worked at night. We evaluated chronotype, a characteristic that may relate to adaptation to light at night. METHODS: We enrolled 1,219 breast cancer cases, 1,385 female controls, 623 prostate cancer cases, and 879 male controls from 11 Spanish regions in 2008-2013. Indoor ALAN information was obtained through questionnaires. Outdoor ALAN was analyzed using images from the International Space Station (ISS) available for Barcelona and Madrid for 2012-2013, including data of remotely sensed upward light intensity and blue light spectrum information for each geocoded longest residence of each MCC-Spain subject. RESULTS: Among Barcelona and Madrid participants with information on both indoor and outdoor ALAN, exposure to outdoor ALAN in the blue light spectrum was associated with breast cancer [adjusted odds ratio (OR) for highest vs. lowest tertile, OR=1.47; 95% CI: 1.00, 2.17] and prostate cancer (OR=2.05; 95% CI: 1.38, 3.03). In contrast, those exposed to the highest versus lowest intensity of outdoor ALAN were more likely to be controls than cases, particularly for prostate cancer. Compared with those who reported sleeping in total darkness, men who slept in “quite illuminated” bedrooms had a higher risk of prostate cancer (OR=2.79; 95% CI: 1.55, 5.04), whereas women had a slightly lower risk of breast cancer (OR=0.77; 95% CI: 0.39, 1.51). CONCLUSION: Both prostate and breast cancer were associated with high estimated exposure to outdoor ALAN in the blue-enriched light spectrum. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1837.  
  Address IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute), Barcelona, Spain  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0091-6765 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29687979; PMCID:PMC6071739 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3044  
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Author Garcia-Saenz, A.; Sanchez de Miguel, A.; Espinosa, A.; Costas, L.; Aragones, N.; Tonne, C.; Moreno, V.; Perez-Gomez, B.; Valentin, A.; Pollan, M.; Castano-Vinyal, G.; Aube, M.; Kogevinas, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Association between outdoor light-at-night exposure and colorectal cancer in Spain (MCC-Spain study) Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.) Abbreviated Journal Epidemiology  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Night shift work, exposure to artificial light-at-night and particularly blue light spectrum, and the consequent circadian disruption may increase the risk of breast and prostate cancer. Colorectal cancer risk may also be increased among night-shift workers. We investigated the association between exposure to artificial light at night according to light spectrum and colorectal cancer among subjects who had never worked at night in a general population case-control study in Spain. METHODS: We examined information on 661 incident histologically verified colorectal cancer cases and 1322 controls from Barcelona and Madrid, 2007-2013. Outdoor artificial light at night exposure was based on images from the International Space Station (ISS) including data on remotely sensed upward light intensity. We derived adjusted odds ratio (OR) estimates and confidence intervals (CI) for visual light, blue light, and spectral sensitivities of the five human photopigments assigned to participant's geocoded longest residence. RESULTS: : Exposure to blue light spectrum was positively associated with colorectal cancer (OR=1.6; 95%CI: 1.2-2.2; highest vs. lowest tertile). ORs were similar (OR=1.7; 95%CI: 1.3-2.3) when further adjusting for area socioeconomic status, diet patterns, smoking, sleep and family history. We observed no association for outdoor visual light (full spectrum) (OR = 1.0, 95%CI 0.7-1.2; highest vs. lowest tertile). Analysis of the five photopigments gave similar results with increased risks for shorter wavelengths overlapping with the blue spectrum and no association for longer wavelengths. CONCLUSIONS: Outdoor blue light spectrum exposure that is increasingly prevalent in recent years may be associated with colorectal cancer risk.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1044-3983 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32639250 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3043  
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Author Paksarian, D.; Rudolph, K.E.; Stapp, E.K.; Dunster, G.P.; He, J.; Mennitt, D.; Hattar, S.; Casey, J.A.; James, P.; Merikangas, K.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Association of Outdoor Artificial Light at Night With Mental Disorders and Sleep Patterns Among US Adolescents Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication JAMA Psychiatry Abbreviated Journal JAMA Psychiatry  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Importance: Indoor nighttime light exposure influences sleep and circadian rhythms and is known to affect mood-associated brain circuits in animals. However, little is known about the association between levels of nighttime outdoor light and sleep and mental health in the population, especially among adolescents. Objective: To estimate associations of outdoor artificial light at night (ALAN) with sleep patterns and past-year mental disorder among US adolescents. Design, Setting, and Participants: This population-based, cross-sectional study of US adolescents used the National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent Supplement, a nationally representative cross-sectional survey conducted from February 2001 through January 2004. A probability sample of adolescents aged 13 to 18 years was included. Analyses were conducted between February 2019 and April 2020. Exposures: Levels of outdoor ALAN, measured by satellite, with means calculated within census block groups. ALAN values were transformed into units of radiance (nW/cm2/sr). Main Outcomes and Measures: Self-reported habitual sleep patterns (weeknight bedtime, weeknight sleep duration, weekend bedtime delay, and weekend oversleep) and past-year mood, anxiety, behavior, and substance use disorders, measured via an in-person structured diagnostic interview. Parent-reported information was included in behavior disorder diagnoses. Results: Among 10123 adolescents (4953 boys [51.3%]; mean [SE] age, 15.2 [0.06] years [weighted]; 6483 for behavior disorder outcomes), ALAN was positively associated with indicators of social disadvantage, such as racial/ethnic minority status (median [IQR] ALAN: white adolescents, 12.96 [30.51] nW/cm2/sr; Hispanic adolescents: 38.54 [47.84] nW/cm2/sr; non-Hispanic black adolescents: 37.39 [51.88] nW/cm2/sr; adolescents of other races/ethnicities: 30.94 [49.93] nW/cm2/sr; P < .001) and lower family income (median [IQR] ALAN by family income-to-poverty ratio </=1.5: 26.76 [52.48] nW/cm2/sr; >6: 21.46 [34.38] nW/cm2/sr; P = .005). After adjustment for several sociodemographic characteristics, as well as area-level population density and socioeconomic status, this study found that higher ALAN levels were associated with later weeknight bedtime, and those in the lowest quartile of ALAN reported the longest weeknight sleep duration. Those in the highest quartile of ALAN went to bed 29 (95% CI, 15-43) minutes later and reported 11 (95% CI, 19-2) fewer minutes of sleep than those in the lowest quartile. ALAN was also positively associated with prevalence of past-year mood and anxiety disorder: each median absolute deviation increase in ALAN was associated with 1.07 (95% CI, 1.00-1.14) times the odds of mood disorder and 1.10 (95% CI, 1.05-1.16) times the odds of anxiety disorder. Further analyses revealed associations with bipolar disorder (odds ratio [OR], 1.19 [95% CI, 1.05-1.35]), specific phobias (OR, 1.18 [95% CI, 1.11-1.26]), and major depressive disorder or dysthymia (OR, 1.07 [95% CI, 1.00-1.15]). Among adolescent girls, differences in weeknight bedtime by ALAN (third and fourth quartiles vs first quartile) were greater with increasing years since menarche (F3, 8.15; P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: In this study, area-level outdoor ALAN was associated with less favorable sleep patterns and mood and anxiety disorder in adolescents. Future studies should elucidate whether interventions to reduce exposure to ALAN may positively affect mental and sleep health.  
  Address Genetic Epidemiology Research Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2168-622X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32639562 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3034  
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