toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Zielinska-Dabkowska, K.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Make lighting healthier Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume 553 Issue 7688 Pages 274-276  
  Keywords Commentary; Lighting; Human Health  
  Abstract Artificial illumination can stop us sleeping and make us ill. We need fresh strategies and technologies, argues Karolina M. Zielinska-Dabkowska.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2932  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lai, K.Y.; Sarkar, C.; Ni, M.Y.; Gallacher, J.; Webster, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Exposure to light at night (LAN) and risk of obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Environmental Research  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Background

There is emerging evidence of the association between light at night (LAN) exposure and weight gain.

Objective

We aim to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies on the association between LAN exposure and risk of obesity in human subjects.

Methods

Peer-reviewed observational studies were systematically searched from MEDLINE (EBSCO), Academic Search Complete (EBSCO), CINAHL Plus (EBSCO) and PubMed up to 24 December 2019. Random-effects models were developed to estimate the associations between LAN exposure and weight-related outcomes of overweight and obesity as measured by body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, waist-hip-ratio and waist-to-height-ratio. The I2 statistic was used to assess the degree of heterogeneity across studies. The National Toxicology Program’s Office of Health Assessment and Translation (OHAT) risk of bias rating tool and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) guideline were respectively employed to assess the risk of bias and to appraise the quality of the generated evidence.

Results

A total of 12 studies (three with longitudinal and nine of cross-sectional design) published between 2003-2019 were included for systematic review, while seven of them fulfilling the inclusion/exclusion criteria were included in the meta-analysis. A higher LAN exposure was significantly associated with 13% higher odds of overweight (BMI≥25 kg/m2) (Summary Odds Ratio; SOR: 1.13, 95% CI: 1.10-1.16) with low heterogeneity (I2 = 27.27%), and 22% higher odds of obesity (BMI≥30 kg/m2) (SOR: 1.22, 95% CI: 1.07-1.38) with substantial heterogeneity (I2 = 85.96%). Stratifying analyses by the levels of measurement of LAN exposures (macro-, meso- and micro-levels) and time of LAN measurement (including before and while sleeping) consistently produced robust estimates, with higher exposure to LAN being positively associated with poorer weight outcomes. Assessment of risk of bias identified substantial detection bias for exposure, with over half of the pooled studies employing subjective LAN measures. The overall evidence of the association between LAN exposure and risk of obesity was rated as ‘moderate’ as per the GRADE guideline.

Conclusions

Exposure to LAN was reported to be a significant risk factor for overweight and obesity. Prospectively designed future studies with objectively measured multi-level LAN exposures and weight outcomes are required.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0013-9351 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2916  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hassan, M.; El‑Taieb, M.; Fares, N.; Fayed, H.; Toghan, R.; Ibrahim, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Men with idiopathic oligoasthenoteratozoospermia exhibit lower serum and seminal plasma melatonin levels: Comparative effect of night‑light exposure with fertile males Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine Abbreviated Journal Exp Ther Med  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Melatonin is a darkness hormone secreted by the pineal gland, which serves a role in idiopathic oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (iOAT). The present study aimed to evaluate the seminal plasma and serum melatonin levels of 50 patients with iOAT and 50 normal fertile controls and the effects of exposure to light at night on semen parameters. Semen analyses were performed according to the World Health Organization 2010 guidelines. Measurements of serum and seminal plasma melatonin, serum TSH, FT3, FT4, free testosterone, prolactin, FSH and LH were performed using ELISA. The overall results revealed that the serum and seminal plasma levels of melatonin were lower in patients with iOAT compared with the control subjects (P=0.0004 and 0.01, respectively). Patients with iOAT who were exposed to light at night exhibited lower serum and seminal plasma melatonin levels compared with those who were not exposed to light at night (P<0.0001 and 0.02, respectively). Additionally, similar significant differences were identified in control subjects exposed to light at night when compared to non‑exposed controls. There was a significantly positive correlation between serum melatonin levels and sperm motility in the entire iOAT patient cohort (r=0.614; P<0.0001) and a significantly positive correlation between the serum and seminal plasma melatonin levels in the non‑exposed iOAT patient subgroup (r=0.753; P<0.001). Thus, darkness and sleep at night may improve the semen parameters of patients with iOAT, as evidenced by the effects of light exposure at night on the serum and seminal plasma levels of melatonin and, consequently, on semen parameters.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1792-0981 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2907  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lee, E.; Kim, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light and Life at Night as Circadian Rhythm Disruptors Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Chronobiology in Medicine Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 1 Issue 3 Pages 95-102  
  Keywords Review; Human Health  
  Abstract Light is an important entraining agent for endogenous circadian rhythms. Artificial light at night (ALAN) negatively influences the circadian system, inducing acute effects on sleep and cognition, as well as chronic endocrine-disrupting effects resulting in obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer. Although shift workers may be exposed to extreme ALAN, its impact on their health is obscured by factors such as daylight exposure, meal and sleep scheduling, and physical and social behavior. Studies have revealed a significant increase in breast cancer in high ALAN-polluted areas, although the correlation with outdoor or indoor lighting conditions is controversial. Increasing use of electronic devices makes it difficult to assess ALAN exposure in the general population. The development of surrogate markers and critical parameters is crucial for health study by ALAN exposure, and such markers should include risk factors related to ALAN exposure. The present review considers articles investigating the risk of ALAN for shift workers, the general population, and users of electronic devices, and addresses susceptibility factors, including age, sex, and chronotype. Shift workers may be regarded as an extreme ALAN-exposure group, but the growing use of electronic devices and lifestyle changes in the general population make difficult to differentiate ALAN risks to health.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2903  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lee, S.-I.; Kinoshita, S.; Noguchi, A.; Eto, T.; Ohashi, M.; Nishimura, Y.; Maeda, K.; Motomura, Y.; Awata, Y.; Higuchi, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Melatonin suppression during a simulated night shift in medium intensity light is increased by 10-minute breaks in dim light and decreased by 10-minute breaks in bright light Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Human Health; Humans; intermittent light at night exposure; light adaptation; melatonin suppression; night shift work; performance; short duration; subjective sleepiness  
  Abstract Exposure to light at night results in disruption of endogenous circadian rhythmicity and/or suppression of pineal melatonin, which can consequently lead to acute or chronic adverse health problems. In the present study, we investigated whether exposure to very dim light or very bright light for a short duration influences melatonin suppression, subjective sleepiness, and performance during exposure to constant moderately bright light. Twenty-four healthy male university students were divided into two experimental groups: Half of them (mean age: 20.0 +/- 0.9 years) participated in an experiment for short-duration (10 min) light conditions of medium intensity light (430 lx, medium breaks) vs. very dim light (< 1 lx, dim breaks) and the other half (mean age: 21.3 +/- 2.5 years) participated in an experiment for short-duration light conditions of medium intensity light (430 lx, medium breaks) vs. very bright light (4700 lx, bright breaks). Each simulated night shift consisting of 5 sets (each including 50-minute night work and 10-minute break) was performed from 01:00 to 06:00 h. The subjects were exposed to medium intensity light (550 lx) during the night work. Each 10-minute break was conducted every hour from 02:00 to 06:00 h. Salivary melatonin concentrations were measured, subjective sleepiness was assessed, the psychomotor vigilance task was performed at hourly intervals from 21:00 h until the end of the experiment. Compared to melatonin suppression between 04:00 and 06:00 h in the condition of medium breaks, the condition of dim breaks significantly promoted melatonin suppression and the condition of bright breaks significantly diminished melatonin suppression. However, there was no remarkable effect of either dim breaks or bright breaks on subjective sleepiness and performance of the psychomotor vigilance task. Our findings suggest that periodic exposure to light for short durations during exposure to a constant light environment affects the sensitivity of pineal melatonin to constant light depending on the difference between light intensities in the two light conditions (i.e., short light exposure vs. constant light exposure). Also, our findings indicate that exposure to light of various intensities at night could be a factor influencing the light-induced melatonin suppression in real night work settings.  
  Address Department of Human Science, Faculty of Design, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32326827 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2894  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: