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Author LeGates, T.A.; Fernandez, D.C.; Hattar, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light as a central modulator of circadian rhythms, sleep and affect Type (up) Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Nature Reviews. Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Nat Rev Neurosci  
  Volume 15 Issue 7 Pages 443-454  
  Keywords Human Health; photobiology; circadian disruption; asynchronization; sleep; mood; Review  
  Abstract Light has profoundly influenced the evolution of life on earth. As widely appreciated, light enables us to generate images of our environment. However, light – through intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) – also influences behaviours that are essential for our health and quality of life but are independent of image formation. These include the synchronization of the circadian clock to the solar day, tracking of seasonal changes and the regulation of sleep. Irregular light environments lead to problems in circadian rhythms and sleep, which eventually cause mood and learning deficits. Recently, it was found that irregular light can also directly affect mood and learning without producing major disruptions in circadian rhythms and sleep. In this Review, we discuss the indirect and direct influence of light on mood and learning, and provide a model for how light, the circadian clock and sleep interact to influence mood and cognitive functions.  
  Address 1] Johns Hopkins University, Department of Biology, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, USA. [2] Johns Hopkins University, Department of Neuroscience, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, USA  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-003X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24917305 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 299  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bashiri, F.; Hassan, C.R.C. doi  openurl
  Title Light Pollution and Its Effect on the Environment Type (up) Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication International Journal of Fundamental Physical Sciences Abbreviated Journal Intl. J. of Fundamental Phys. Sci.  
  Volume 4 Issue 1 Pages 8-12  
  Keywords Light pollution, human health, animal behaviour, plant growth  
  Abstract Light pollution can cause disturbance to humans as well as animals. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of light pollution on human's health, plants, animals, human body and People’s attitude about light pollution. About 90% of people strongly agreed that excessive lighting has adverse effects on a person's health. At least, 70% of people had difficulty in sleeping because of light pollution. Most of people believed that video Billboards, Spotlights, Car headlights and Street lights are the most important source of light pollution and about 60% of people agree that light pollution can affect animal’s sleep. 60% of people believed that excessive artificial light can attract several kinks of birds and insects. The results of this study indicate that the human health, plants growth and animal behaviour are strongly affected by the light pollution.‎  
  Address Faculty of Engineering University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 313  
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Author Dauchy, R.T.; Xiang, S.; Mao, L.; Brimer, S.; Wren, M.A.; Yuan, L.; Anbalagan, M.; Hauch, A.; Frasch, T.; Rowan, B.G.; Blask, D.E.; Hill, S.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian and melatonin disruption by exposure to light at night drives intrinsic resistance to tamoxifen therapy in breast cancer Type (up) Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Cancer Research Abbreviated Journal Cancer Res  
  Volume 74 Issue 15 Pages 4099-4110  
  Keywords *Cancer; breast cancer; melatonin; endocrinology; tamoxifen; *Circadian Rhythm; circadian disruption; human health; epidemiology  
  Abstract Resistance to endocrine therapy is a major impediment to successful treatment of breast cancer. Preclinical and clinical evidence links resistance to antiestrogen drugs in breast cancer cells with the overexpression and/or activation of various pro-oncogenic tyrosine kinases. Disruption of circadian rhythms by night shift work or disturbed sleep-wake cycles may lead to an increased risk of breast cancer and other diseases. Moreover, light exposure at night (LEN) suppresses the nocturnal production of melatonin that inhibits breast cancer growth. In this study, we used a rat model of estrogen receptor (ERalpha(+)) MCF-7 tumor xenografts to demonstrate how altering light/dark cycles with dim LEN (dLEN) speed the development of breast tumors, increasing their metabolism and growth and conferring an intrinsic resistance to tamoxifen therapy. These characteristics were not observed in animals in which the circadian melatonin rhythm was not disrupted, or in animals subjected to dLEN if they received nocturnal melatonin replacement. Strikingly, our results also showed that melatonin acted both as a tumor metabolic inhibitor and a circadian-regulated kinase inhibitor to reestablish the sensitivity of breast tumors to tamoxifen and tumor regression. Together, our findings show how dLEN-mediated disturbances in nocturnal melatonin production can render tumors insensitive to tamoxifen. Cancer Res; 74(15); 4099-110. (c)2014 AACR.  
  Address Departments of Structural and Cellular Biology and Tulane Cancer Center and Louisiana Cancer Research Consortium; Tulane Circadian Cancer Biology Group; and  
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  ISSN 0008-5472 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:25062775; PMCID:PMC4119539 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 355  
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Author Figueiro, M.G.; Wood, B.; Plitnick, B.; Rea, M.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The impact of watching television on evening melatonin levels: Impact of watching television on evening melatonin Type (up) Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of the Society for Information Display Abbreviated Journal Jnl Soc Info Display  
  Volume 21 Issue 10 Pages 417-421  
  Keywords Human Health; television; correlated color temperature; sleep; melatonin levels; blue light; circadian disruption  
  Abstract Self-luminous electronic devices emit optical radiation at short wavelengths, close to the peak sensitivity of melatonin suppression. The present paper investigated if light from a 178-cm (70 in.) television suppressed melatonin. Results showed that light from televisions does not impact melatonin levels in the evening.  
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  ISSN 1071-0922 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 498  
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Author Czeisler, C.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Perspective: casting light on sleep deficiency Type (up) Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume 497 Issue 7450 Pages S13  
  Keywords Human Health; Circadian Rhythm/physiology/radiation effects; Electricity/adverse effects; Humans; Jet Lag Syndrome/etiology/physiopathology/therapy; Lighting/*adverse effects; Melatonin/metabolism/secretion; Phototherapy; Sleep Deprivation/epidemiology/*etiology/*physiopathology/therapy; Suprachiasmatic Nucleus/physiology/radiation effects  
  Abstract  
  Address Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Division of Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, in Boston, Massachusetts, USA. charles_czeisler@hms.harvard.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23698501 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 499  
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