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Author Shochat, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Impact of lifestyle and technology developments on sleep Type (up) Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Nature and Science of Sleep Abbreviated Journal Nat Sci Sleep  
  Volume 4 Issue Pages 19-31  
  Keywords Human Health; behavior; lifestyle; sleep; technology  
  Abstract Although the physiological and psychological mechanisms involved in the development of sleep disorders remain similar throughout history, factors that potentiate these mechanisms are closely related to the “zeitgeist”, ie, the sociocultural, technological and lifestyle trends which characterize an era. Technological advancements have afforded modern society with 24-hour work operations, transmeridian travel and exposure to a myriad of electronic devices such as televisions, computers and cellular phones. Growing evidence suggests that these advancements take their toll on human functioning and health via their damaging effects on sleep quality, quantity and timing. Additional behavioral lifestyle factors associated with poor sleep include weight gain, insufficient physical exercise and consumption of substances such as caffeine, alcohol and nicotine. Some of these factors have been implicated as self-help aids used to combat daytime sleepiness and impaired daytime functioning. This review aims to highlight current lifestyle trends that have been shown in scientific investigations to be associated with sleep patterns, sleep duration and sleep quality. Current understanding of the underlying mechanisms of these associations will be presented, as well as some of the reported consequences. Available therapies used to treat some lifestyle related sleep disorders will be discussed. Perspectives will be provided for further investigation of lifestyle factors that are associated with poor sleep, including developing theoretical frameworks, identifying underlying mechanisms, and establishing appropriate therapies and public health interventions aimed to improve sleep behaviors in order to enhance functioning and health in modern society.  
  Address Department of Nursing, Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Sciences, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1179-1608 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23616726; PMCID:PMC3630968 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 515  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sigurdardottir, L.G.; Valdimarsdottir, U.A.; Fall, K.; Rider, J.R.; Lockley, S.W.; Schernhammer, E.; Mucci, L.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian disruption, sleep loss, and prostate cancer risk: a systematic review of epidemiologic studies Type (up) Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology Abbreviated Journal Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev  
  Volume 21 Issue 7 Pages 1002-1011  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Humans; Male; Prostatic Neoplasms/*epidemiology/*etiology; Risk Factors; *Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm; *Work Schedule Tolerance  
  Abstract Disruption of the circadian system has been hypothesized to increase cancer risk, either because of direct disruption of the molecular machinery generating circadian rhythms or because of disruption of parameters controlled by the clock such as melatonin levels or sleep duration. This hypothesis has been studied in hormone-dependent cancers among women, but data are sparse about potential effects of circadian disruption on the risk of prostate cancer. This review systematically examines available data evaluating the effects of light at night, sleep patterns, and night shift work on prostate cancer risk.  
  Address Centre of Public Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. lara@sessionimpossible.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1055-9965 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22564869; PMCID:PMC3392423 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 516  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Vollmer, C.; Randler, C.; Di Milia, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Further evidence for the influence of photoperiod at birth on chronotype in a sample of German adolescents Type (up) Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 29 Issue 10 Pages 1345-1351  
  Keywords Human Health; Adolescent; Child; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Female; Germany; Humans; Male; Parturition/*physiology; *Photoperiod; Puberty/physiology; *Seasons; Sleep/*physiology  
  Abstract Individuals differ in their circadian preferences (chronotype). There is evidence in the literature to support a season-of-birth effect on chronotype but the evidence is not convincing. In part, the relationship is obscured by a number of methodological differences between studies, including the measures used to define morningness, the way in which the seasons were categorized, and the sample size. This study adds to the literature in several ways. First, we adopt a new approach to categorizing the photoperiod rather than the calendar season; thus we prefer to use the term photoperiod at birth. Second, we used two measures of morningness. Third, we used a large and homogeneous German sample. The results show that adolescents (n = 2905) born during the increasing photoperiod (Feb-Apr) had a significantly later midpoint of sleep (MSFsc) than those born during the decreasing photoperiod (Aug-Oct). A similar pattern was found for the Composite Scale of Morningness (CSM). Furthermore, both measures of chronotype demonstrated a significant quadratic function over a 1-yr cycle. When looking at each of six consecutive years separately, the Composite Scale of Morningness suggests a cosine rhythm linked to increasing and decreasing photoperiods that becomes weaker in amplitude with increasing age. Despite the strengths in our study, the effect of photoperiod at birth on chronotype remains small. Future studies may require larger sample sizes, may need to explore how neonatal light exposure modulates chronotype, and may need to track how puberty and adolescent lifestyle habits mask the photoperiod effect.  
  Address Department of Biology, University of Education Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 561-2, Heidelberg, Germany. vollmer@ph-heidelberg.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23130997 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 517  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wada, K.; Nagata, C.; Nakamura, K.; Iwasa, S.; Shiraki, M.; Shimizu, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light exposure at night, sleep duration and sex hormone levels in pregnant Japanese women Type (up) Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Endocrine Journal Abbreviated Journal Endocr J  
  Volume 59 Issue 5 Pages 393-398  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract The association between light exposure at night and sex hormone levels in utero has scarcely reported. We assessed the associations between sleep duration or being awake in the late evening hours, which can be as indicator of light exposure at night, and the maternal and umbilical blood hormone levels during pregnancy and at delivery among Japanese women. The data for 236 women and their newborns who visited a maternal clinic in Gifu, Japan, between May 2000 and October 2001 were analyzed. Maternal blood samples were obtained at approximately the 10th weeks, 29th weeks of gestation, and at delivery. Umbilical cord artery blood was immediately drawn after birth. Information for sleep during pregnancy was obtained by a self-administered questionnaire. The levels of estradiol and testosterone were measured using radioimmunoassay. Maternal serum testosterone level in the 10th week was higher among those who were awake at or after 1:00 a.m. than among those who were asleep at that time (P = 0.032). Maternal estradiol level in the 29th week was inversely associated with sleep duration on weekends (P = 0.043). Umbilical testosterone level at delivery inversely correlated with sleep duration on weekdays (P = 0.030). These associations were somewhat stronger among mothers with female offspring than those with male offspring. These results suggested that exposure to light at night might increase sex hormone levels during pregnancy.  
  Address  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0918-8959 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 518  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Warthen, D.M.; Provencio, I. url  openurl
  Title The role of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells in nonimage-forming responses to light Type (up) Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Eye and Brain Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 4 Issue Pages 43—48  
  Keywords Human Health; amygdala; bed nucleus of the stria terminalis; melanopsin; opsin; optic nerve; retina  
  Abstract Light exerts many effects on behavior and physiology. These effects can be characterized as either image-forming or nonimage-forming (NIF) visual processes. Image-forming vision refers to the process of detecting objects and organisms in the environment and distinguishing their physical characteristics, such as size, shape, and direction of motion. NIF vision, in contrast, refers to effects of light that are independent of fine spatiotemporal vision. NIF effects are many and varied, ranging from modulation of basal physiology, such as heart rate and body temperature, to changes in higher functions, such as mood and cognitive performance. In mammals, many NIF effects of light are dependent upon the inner retinal photopigment melanopsin and the cells in which melanopsin is expressed, the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs). The ipRGCs project broadly throughout the brain. Many of these projections terminate in areas known to mediate NIF effects, while others terminate in regions whose link to photoreception remains to be established. Additionally, the presence of ipRGC projections to areas of the brain with no known link to photoreception suggests the existence of additional ipRGC-mediated NIF effects. This review summarizes the known NIF effects of light and the role of melanopsin and ipRGCs in driving these effects, with an eye toward stimulating further investigation of the many and varied effects of light on physiology and behavior.  
  Address  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 519  
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