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Author Prayag, A.; Münch, M.; Aeschbach, D.; Chellappa, S.; Gronfier, C.
Title Light Modulation of Human Clocks, Wake, and Sleep Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Clocks & Sleep Abbreviated Journal Clocks & Sleep
Volume 1 Issue 1 Pages 193-208
Keywords Human Health; Review
Abstract Light, through its non-imaging forming effects, plays a dominant role on a myriad of physiological functions, including the human sleep–wake cycle. The non-image forming effects of light heavily rely on specific properties such as intensity, duration, timing, pattern, and wavelengths. Here, we address how specific properties of light influence sleep and wakefulness in humans through acute effects, e.g., on alertness, and/or effects on the circadian timing system. Of critical relevance, we discuss how different characteristics of light exposure across the 24-h day can lead to changes in sleep–wake timing, sleep propensity, sleep architecture, and sleep and wake electroencephalogram (EEG) power spectra. Ultimately, knowledge on how light affects sleep and wakefulness can improve light settings at home and at the workplace to improve health and well-being and optimize treatments of chronobiological disorders.
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ISSN 2624-5175 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2266
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Author Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Bará, S.; Aubé, M.; Cardiel, N.; Tapia, C.E.; Zamorano, J.; Gaston, K.J.
Title Evaluating Human Photoreceptoral Inputs from Night-Time Lights Using RGB Imaging Photometry Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Imaging Abbreviated Journal J. Imaging
Volume 5 Issue 4 Pages 49
Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing; Instrumentation
Abstract Night-time lights interact with human physiology through different pathways starting at the retinal layers of the eye; from the signals provided by the rods; the S-, L- and M-cones; and the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGC). These individual photic channels combine in complex ways to modulate important physiological processes, among them the daily entrainment of the neural master oscillator that regulates circadian rhythms. Evaluating the relative excitation of each type of photoreceptor generally requires full knowledge of the spectral power distribution of the incoming light, information that is not easily available in many practical applications. One such instance is wide area sensing of public outdoor lighting; present-day radiometers onboard Earth-orbiting platforms with sufficient nighttime sensitivity are generally panchromatic and lack the required spectral discrimination capacity. In this paper, we show that RGB imagery acquired with off-the-shelf digital single-lens reflex cameras (DSLR) can be a useful tool to evaluate, with reasonable accuracy and high angular resolution, the photoreceptoral inputs associated with a wide range of lamp technologies. The method is based on linear regressions of these inputs against optimum combinations of the associated R, G, and B signals, built for a large set of artificial light sources by means of synthetic photometry. Given the widespread use of RGB imaging devices, this approach is expected to facilitate the monitoring of the physiological effects of light pollution, from ground and space alike, using standard imaging technology.
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ISSN 2313-433X ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2294
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Author Kozaki, Tomoaki; Taketomi, Ryunosuke; Hidaka ,Yuki; Ida, Nagisa; Yasuda, Takeo
Title Preventive Effect of Morning Bluish LED Light on Light-induced Melatonin Suppression at Night Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Science and Technology in Lighting Abbreviated Journal
Volume 41 Issue Pages 206-210
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Bright nocturnal light has been known to suppress melatonin secretion. However, bright light exposure during daytime might reduce light-induced melatonin suppression (LIMS) at night. This study aims to evaluate the effect of high correlated color temperature LED light during daytime on LIMS. Male participants were exposed to different light conditions for 3 h in the morning (09:00â??12:00). The light conditions were dim light (<10 lx), 125 lx high correlated color temperature (CCT) LED light, and 250 lx high CCT LED light. The subjects were then exposed to bright light (white light, 300 lx) for 1.5 h at night (01:00â??02:30). Saliva samples were taken before (01:00) and after (02:30) exposure for evaluation of melatonin secretion. There were no significant differences in melatonin secretion before and after night-time light exposure on the 125 lx and 250 lx morning light conditions. Since these light intensities were almost equal to those in our previous study, the high CCT LED light might be appropriate for certain work places (e.g., hospitals and underground spaces), contributing to the reduction of our health risk and also saving energy.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1785
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Author Desaulniers, J.; Desjardins, S.; Lapierre, S.; Desgagné, A.
Title Sleep Environment and Insomnia in Elderly Persons Living at Home Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Aging Research Abbreviated Journal Journal of Aging Research
Volume 2018 Issue Pages 1-7
Keywords Human Health
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ISSN 2090-2204 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2016
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Author McGlashan, E.M.; Poudel, G.R.; Vidafar, P.; Drummond, S.P.A.; Cain, S.W.
Title Imaging Individual Differences in the Response of the Human Suprachiasmatic Area to Light Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Neurology Abbreviated Journal Front. Neurol.
Volume 9 Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Circadian disruption is associated with poor health outcomes, including sleep and mood disorders. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus acts as the master biological clock in mammals, regulating circadian rhythms throughout the body. The clock is synchronized to the day/night cycle via retinal light exposure. The BOLD-fMRI response of the human suprachiasmatic area to light has been shown to be greater in the night than in the day, consistent with the known sensitivity of the clock to light at night. Whether the BOLD-fMRI response of the human suprachiasmatic area to light is related to a functional outcome has not been demonstrated. In a pilot study (n = 10), we investigated suprachiasmatic area activation in response to light in a 30 s block-paradigm of lights on (100 lux) and lights off (< 1 lux) using the BOLD-fMRI response, compared to each participant's melatonin suppression response to moderate indoor light (100 lux). We found a significant correlation between activation in the suprachiasmatic area in response to light in the scanner and melatonin suppression, with increased melatonin suppression being associated with increased suprachiasmatic area activation in response to the same light level. These preliminary findings are a first step toward using imaging techniques to measure individual differences in circadian light sensitivity, a measure that may have clinical relevance in understanding vulnerability in disorders that are influenced by circadian disruption.
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1664-2295 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2114
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