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Author Ahmed M. A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Avoiding room light during night may stimulate immunity in COVID-19 patients by promoting melatonin production Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Melatonin Research Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 3 Issue 4 Pages 476-481  
  Keywords Human Health; Commentary  
  Abstract COVID-19 is one of the greatest health issues facing humankind for many decades; it emerged in Wuhan, China, late in December 2019, and rapidly spread over the world within the short period. This report emphasizes the potential hazards of exposure to room light at night which affects the immunity of COVID-19 patients by suppressing their melatonin, which is only released from the pineal gland at night. Exposure to light at night is especially common in the hospital setting. This may make the symptom worse for the hospitalized patients and the light at night should not be ignored. Thus, I suggest that COVID-19 patients should avoid light at night either by wearing eye masks or darkening the room to enhance pineal melatonin synthesis and increase their serum melatonin levels.  
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  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3204  
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Author Aarts, M.P.J.; Hartmeyer, S.L.; Morsink, K.; Kort, H.S.M.; de Kort, Y.A.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Can Special Light Glasses Reduce Sleepiness and Improve Sleep of Nightshift Workers? A Placebo-Controlled Explorative Field Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Clocks & Sleep Abbreviated Journal Clocks & Sleep  
  Volume 2 Issue 2 Pages 225-245  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Nightshift workers go against the natural sleep–wake rhythm. Light can shift the circadian clock but can also induce acute alertness. This placebo-controlled exploratory field study examined the effectiveness of light glasses to improve alertness while reducing the sleep complaints of hospital nurses working nightshifts. In a crossover within-subjects design, 23 nurses participated, using treatment glasses and placebo glasses. Sleepiness and sleep parameters were measured. A linear mixed model analysis on sleepiness revealed no significant main effect of the light intervention. An interaction effect was found indicating that under the placebo condition, sleepiness was significantly higher on the first nightshift than on the last night, while under the treatment condition, sleepiness remained stable across nightshift sessions. Sleepiness during the commute home also showed a significant interaction effect, demonstrating that after the first nightshift, driver sleepiness was higher for placebo than for treatment. Subjective sleep quality showed a negative main effect of treatment vs. placebo, particularly after the first nightshift. In retrospect, both types of light glasses were self-rated as effective. The use of light glasses during the nightshift may help to reduce driver sleepiness during the commute home, which is relevant, as all participants drove home by car or (motor) bike.  
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  ISSN 2624-5175 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2977  
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Author Prayag, A.; Münch, M.; Aeschbach, D.; Chellappa, S.; Gronfier, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light Modulation of Human Clocks, Wake, and Sleep Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Clocks & Sleep Abbreviated Journal Clocks & Sleep  
  Volume 1 Issue 1 Pages 193-208  
  Keywords Human Health; Review  
  Abstract Light, through its non-imaging forming effects, plays a dominant role on a myriad of physiological functions, including the human sleep–wake cycle. The non-image forming effects of light heavily rely on specific properties such as intensity, duration, timing, pattern, and wavelengths. Here, we address how specific properties of light influence sleep and wakefulness in humans through acute effects, e.g., on alertness, and/or effects on the circadian timing system. Of critical relevance, we discuss how different characteristics of light exposure across the 24-h day can lead to changes in sleep–wake timing, sleep propensity, sleep architecture, and sleep and wake electroencephalogram (EEG) power spectra. Ultimately, knowledge on how light affects sleep and wakefulness can improve light settings at home and at the workplace to improve health and well-being and optimize treatments of chronobiological disorders.  
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  ISSN 2624-5175 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2266  
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Author Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Bará, S.; Aubé, M.; Cardiel, N.; Tapia, C.E.; Zamorano, J.; Gaston, K.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluating Human Photoreceptoral Inputs from Night-Time Lights Using RGB Imaging Photometry Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Imaging Abbreviated Journal J. Imaging  
  Volume 5 Issue 4 Pages 49  
  Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing; Instrumentation  
  Abstract Night-time lights interact with human physiology through different pathways starting at the retinal layers of the eye; from the signals provided by the rods; the S-, L- and M-cones; and the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGC). These individual photic channels combine in complex ways to modulate important physiological processes, among them the daily entrainment of the neural master oscillator that regulates circadian rhythms. Evaluating the relative excitation of each type of photoreceptor generally requires full knowledge of the spectral power distribution of the incoming light, information that is not easily available in many practical applications. One such instance is wide area sensing of public outdoor lighting; present-day radiometers onboard Earth-orbiting platforms with sufficient nighttime sensitivity are generally panchromatic and lack the required spectral discrimination capacity. In this paper, we show that RGB imagery acquired with off-the-shelf digital single-lens reflex cameras (DSLR) can be a useful tool to evaluate, with reasonable accuracy and high angular resolution, the photoreceptoral inputs associated with a wide range of lamp technologies. The method is based on linear regressions of these inputs against optimum combinations of the associated R, G, and B signals, built for a large set of artificial light sources by means of synthetic photometry. Given the widespread use of RGB imaging devices, this approach is expected to facilitate the monitoring of the physiological effects of light pollution, from ground and space alike, using standard imaging technology.  
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  ISSN 2313-433X ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2294  
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Author Kozaki, Tomoaki; Taketomi, Ryunosuke; Hidaka ,Yuki; Ida, Nagisa; Yasuda, Takeo url  doi
openurl 
  Title Preventive Effect of Morning Bluish LED Light on Light-induced Melatonin Suppression at Night Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Science and Technology in Lighting Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 41 Issue Pages 206-210  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Bright nocturnal light has been known to suppress melatonin secretion. However, bright light exposure during daytime might reduce light-induced melatonin suppression (LIMS) at night. This study aims to evaluate the effect of high correlated color temperature LED light during daytime on LIMS. Male participants were exposed to different light conditions for 3 h in the morning (09:00â??12:00). The light conditions were dim light (<10 lx), 125 lx high correlated color temperature (CCT) LED light, and 250 lx high CCT LED light. The subjects were then exposed to bright light (white light, 300 lx) for 1.5 h at night (01:00â??02:30). Saliva samples were taken before (01:00) and after (02:30) exposure for evaluation of melatonin secretion. There were no significant differences in melatonin secretion before and after night-time light exposure on the 125 lx and 250 lx morning light conditions. Since these light intensities were almost equal to those in our previous study, the high CCT LED light might be appropriate for certain work places (e.g., hospitals and underground spaces), contributing to the reduction of our health risk and also saving energy.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1785  
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