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Author Lee, S., Matsumori, K., Nishimura, K., Nishimura, Y., Ikeda, Y., Eto, T., & Higuchi, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Melatonin suppression and sleepiness in children exposed to blue-enriched white LED lighting at night Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Physiological Reports Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 6 Issue 24 Pages  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Light-induced melatonin suppression in children is reported to be more sensitive to white light at night than that in adults; however, it is unclear whether it depends on spectral distribution of lighting. In this study, we investigated the effects of different color temperatures of LED lighting on children’s melatonin secretion during the night. Twenty-two healthy children (8.9  2.2 years old) and 20 adults (41.7  4.4 years old) participated in this

study. A between-subjects design with four combinations, including two age

groups (adults and children) and the two color temperature conditions

(3000 K and 6200 K), was used. The experiment was conducted for two consecutive nights. On the first night, saliva samples were collected every hour

under a dim light condition (<30 lx). On the second night, the participants

were exposed to either color temperature condition. Melatonin suppression in

children was greater than that in adults at both 3000 K and 6200 K condition.

The 6200 K condition resulted in greater melatonin suppression than did the

3000 K condition in children (P < 0.05) but not in adults. Subjective sleepiness in children exposed to 6200 K light was significantly lower than that in

children exposed to 3000 K light. In children, blue-enriched LED lighting has

a greater impact on melatonin suppression and it inhibits the increase in

sleepiness during night. Light with a low color temperature is recommended

at night, particularly for children’s sleep and circadian rhythm.
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2312  
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Author Hasegawa‐Ohira, M., Kato, Y., & Nomura, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of LED lighting exposure during sleep on endocrine and autonomic nervous system activity Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication IEEJ Transactions on Electrical and Electronic Engineering Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 14 Issue 6 Pages 894-898  
  Keywords Human Health; LED; endocrine; sleep; sympathetic nervous system; hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal pathway  
  Abstract The present study aimed to investigate the effect of an LED lighting on endocrine and autonomic nervous system activity during sleep. In a within‐subject experimental design, participants, ten healthy male students, took a 6‐h sleep from 0:00–6:00 am in an environmentally controlled room during which they were exposed to an LED lighting of approximately 50 lx for 90 min from 1:30–3:00 am, whereas there was no light exposure under the control condition. Compared to the control condition, the heart rate (HR) during light exposure, 1 h before awakening, and 1 h after awakening, was significantly higher under the light exposure condition. Salivary melatonin under the light exposure was significantly higher than that under control condition, meanwhile there was no difference in salivary cortisol secretion. Light exposure during sleep may enhance the sympathetic nervous system activation but not give an impact on the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal pathway during sleep.  
  Address Faculty of Education, Shiga University, 2‐5‐1 Hiratsu Ostu, Shiga, 520‐0862 Japan; ohira@edu.shiga-u.ac.jp  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2347  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Simons, K. S., van den Boogaard, M., & de Jager, C. P. C. url  openurl
  Title Impact of intensive care unit light and noise exposure on critically ill patients Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Neth j crit care Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages  
  Keywords Human Health; Review  
  Abstract Recently, the importance of the ICU environment as a potential modifiable factor for improvement of patient care has become more clear. In this review, we describe the effects of light and noise exposure on ICU patients. In ICU patients circadian rhythms and sleep are severely disturbed, which may increase the risk of delirium. Realignment of circadian rhythmicity by means of artificial light therapy has not been shown to reduce the incidence or duration of delirium. Prudent use of nighttime light may be a first step in improvement of patient sleep. Eye masks appear to improve sleep although they are only applicable for a selected group of patients. Noise levels in the ICU are above recommended standards. Negative effects include disturbances of sleep, as often encountered in ICU patients. Staff activity and talking contribute substantially to the total acoustic energy, providing opportunities to adapt behaviour and/or workflow in order to reduce noise pollution.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2624  
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Author Donker, D. W. url  openurl
  Title Light and noise nuisance … deciphered yet underappreciated ‘Rosetta Stone’ of the modern ICU? Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Netherlands Journal of Critical Care Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 144  
  Keywords Commentary; Human Health; hospitals; Department of Intensive Care Unit; health care  
  Abstract In everyday life, we take for granted that public authorities protect us from an unhealthy environment, including light and noise pollution. In recent years, about 1200 kilometres of noise barriers have been built alongside Dutch highways with costs approaching a billion euros. Also, more than 50 cities in the Netherlands have successfully taken initiatives to reduce the artificial light pollution in the past six years, as our country is well known to rank among the literally most illuminated ones in the world. These investments seem to be reasonable as adverse health effects from environmental light and noise pollution have long and widely been recognised. How these potentially detrimental effects of artificial light and distressing noise acting on the human body translate into the best possible care that we strive to provide within our modern ICU environment is an area of increasing professional awareness, interest and research. Yet, we all realise that not only light and noise, but numerous physical and psychological stressors may negatively affect individual ICU patients. Also, the impact of these factors may vary considerably among individuals, which makes it even more difficult for caregivers to prioritise among apparently competing aspects of care in their daily practice. A comprehensive, narrative review by Koen Simons and colleagues in this issue of the Netherlands Journal of Critical Care provides us with up-to-date information on the ‘impact of intensive care unit light and noise exposure on critically ill patients’.Here, we gain more insights and learn how a multimodal approach to our ICU environment may aid to optimise light exposure and reduce noise. This may not only improve our patients’ sleep and general wellbeing, but also

reduce the incidence of delirium. The latter seems especially relevant since the pharmacological prevention of delirium has repeatedly been shown to be disappointing, as recently confirmed again in a large Dutch trial. All this evidence sets the stage to further promote nonpharmacological interventions in the ICU to prevent delirium. Therefore, we should do our best to limit controllable stressors in the ICU in order to improve patient comfort and hopefully enhance the individual prognosis. As our traditional focus on the medical and technical aspects of critical care has led us to asymptotically reach current therapeutic optima; human factors and soft skills are no longer far in the horizon of the modern ICU.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher NJCC Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2625  
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Author Zielińska-Dąbkowska, K. url  openurl
  Title Home Sweet Home. Connecting the dots for healthy evening residential illumination Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication ARC Lighting In Architecture Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 55-60  
  Keywords Lighting; Human Health  
  Abstract During the twentieth century, lighting designers would commonly use incandescent light sources for residential homes as they provided a visual comfort, with high quality colour rendering properties, along with relaxing ambient atmosphere. Unfortunately, it’s now difficult to buy incandescent light sources because they have been banned in many countries (https://bit.ly/2GwN2Wv). This article addresses some of the challenges in regards to health, brought about by the changeover to new LEDs and other related technologies, and tries to offer some context on how to keep up with these rapid transformations. While we know it’s necessary to limit blue-rich light at night (as it prevents melatonin production and impaires nocturnal sleep), and that it’s important to maximise exposure to the blue wavelength of light in the morning (to trigger circadian timing, increase alertness), there are other issues that are misunderstood and often ignored. This includes flicker from LEDs and electromagnetic fields (EMFs), which can be produced by smart home lighting technology.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2726  
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