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Author Anbalagan, M.; Dauchy, R.; Xiang, S.; Robling, A.; Blask, D.; Rowan, B.; Hill, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title SAT-337 Disruption Of The Circadian Melatonin Signal By Dim Light At Night Promotes Bone-lytic Breast Cancer Metastases Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of the Endocrine Society Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 3 Issue Supplement_1 Pages  
  Keywords Human Health; Cancer; Breast cancer; melatonin; shift work; mouse models  
  Abstract Breast cancer metastasis to bone is a major source of morbidity and mortality in women with advanced metastatic breast cancer. Morbidity from metastasis to bone is compounded by the fact that they cannot be surgically removed and can only be treated with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. Thus, there is critical need to develop new treatment strategies that kill bone metastatic tumors and reduce osteolytic lesions to improve patient quality of life and extend patient survival. Circadian rhythms are daily cycles of ~24 h that control many if not most physiologic processes and their disruption by exposure to light at night (LAN) or jet lag has been shown to be strongly associated with the development of cancer, particularly breast cancer. We have found that disruption of the anti-cancer circadian hormone melatonin (MLT) by light at night can significantly enhance the metastatic potential in breast cancer cells. Our work supports the report of the International Agency for Research on Cancer that shift work is a “probable human carcinogen” and highlights the association between exposure to light at night and invasive breast cancer. We recently reported that human breast tumor xenografts grown in athymic nude female rats housed in a photoperiod of 12h light at day: 12h dim light at night (dLAN, 0.2 lux – blocks the nighttime circadian MLT signal), display resistance to doxorubicin (Dox). More importantly, tumor growth and drug resistance could be blocked by the administration of Dox in circadian alignment with nocturnal MLT during dLAN. Our recent preliminary studies show that poorly invasive ERα positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells, when injected into the tibia (to mimic bone metastatic disease) of Foxn1nu athymic nude mice (which produce a strong circadian nighttime melatonin signal) housed in a dLAN photoperiod (suppressed nocturnal MLT production) developed full blown breast cancer tumors in bone (P<0.05) that are highly osteolytic (P<0.05). Moreover, patients with metastatic breast cancer are routinely treated with doxorubicin, which itself can promote bone damage. Our studies demonstrate that MLT slows the growth of metastatic breast cancer in bone but that the chrono-therapeutic use of doxorubicin in circadian alignment with melatonin in Foxn1nu mice with tibial breast tumors, reduced tumor growth in bone, reduced bone erosion, and promoted the formation of new bone. Successful use of this chronotherapeutic use of Dox and MLT in clinical trials increasing efficacy in preventing or suppressing breast cancer metastasis to bone while decreasing toxic side effects of doxorubicin would provide a revolutionary advancement in the treatment of bone metastatic breast cancer and decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with breast cancer metastasis to bone.  
  Address Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, United States  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Oxford Academic Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2472-1972 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2433  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Kurumatani, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Obayashi et al. Respond to “Light at Night Predicts Depression—What Next?” Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication American Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 187 Issue 3 Pages 439-440  
  Keywords Commentary; Human Health  
  Abstract Our research includes some strengths and limitations. The most important strength is objective measurement of light at night (LAN) intensity using a bedside light meter. Most previous studies evaluating the association between LAN and health outcomes have assessed indoor LAN levels using a self-reported questionnaire or outdoor LAN levels using satellite data; however, self-reported indoor LAN levels has not yet been validated with objective measurement and outdoor LAN levels are surrogates for an individual LAN exposure. The second strength of our study includes its longitudinal design using multivariable methods to adjust for confounders, which indicated LAN exposure may be a cause of the incidence of depressive symptoms. Indeed, the depressive score evaluated by questionnaires may be above or below the cut-off value over the short term; therefore, a long-term study considering such unstable outcomes should be conducted. In the current study, LAN exposure was measured for only two nights; thus, an amplitude of LAN intensity has been focused. However, multiple measurements over time in the future study would allow an analysis of fluctuations in LAN exposure, which might be important for circadian physiology.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-9262 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1717  
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Author Hasler, B.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Commentary on Bedroom Light Exposure at Night and the Incidence of Depressive Symptoms: A Longitudinal Study of the HEIJOKYO Cohort (Obayashi et al) Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication American Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 187 Issue 3 Pages 435-438  
  Keywords Commentary; Human Health  
  Abstract In modern society, we are increasingly disconnected from natural light/dark cycles and beset by round-the-clock exposure to artificial light. Light has powerful effects on physical and mental health, in part via the circadian system, and thus the timing of light exposure dictates whether it is helpful or harmful. In their compelling paper, Obayashi and colleagues offer evidence that light at night can prospectively predict an elevated incidence of depressive symptoms in older adults. Strengths of the study include the longitudinal design and direct, objective assessment of light levels, as well as accounting for multiple plausible confounders during analyses. Follow-up studies should address the study's limitations, including reliance on a global self-report of sleep quality and a two-night assessment of light exposure that may not reliably represent typical light exposure. In addition, experimental studies including physiological circadian measures will be necessary to determine if the light effects on depression are mediated through the circadian system or are so-called “direct” effects of light. In any case, these exciting findings could inform novel new approaches to preventing depressive disorders in older adults.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-9262 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1716  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mulvin, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Media Prophylaxis: Night Modes and the Politics of Preventing Harm Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Information & Culture Abbreviated Journal Information & Culture  
  Volume 53 Issue 2 Pages 175-202  
  Keywords Human Health; Society  
  Abstract This article develops the term “media prophylaxis” to analyze the ways technologies are applied to challenges of calibrating one’s body with its environment and as defenses against endemic, human-made harms. In recent years, self-illuminated screens (like those of computers, phones, and tablets) have been identified by scientists, journalists, and concerned individuals as particularly pernicious sources of sleep-disrupting light. By tracing the history of circadian research, the effects of light on sleep patterns, and the recent appearance of software like “f.lux,” Apple’s “Night Shift,” and “Twilight,” this article shows how media-prophylactic technologies can individualize responsibility for preventing harm while simultaneously surfacing otherwise ignored forms of chronic suffering.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2164-8034 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1853  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wurtman, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Pineal and Endocrine Function Type Journal Article
  Year 1969 Publication Hospital Practice Abbreviated Journal Hospital Practice  
  Volume 4 Issue 1 Pages 32-37  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Recognition that levels of hormonal secretion vary markedly from day to night has triggered intensive investigation into the influence of environmental light upon endocrine function. These studies have pointed to the pineal gland as a major mediator of a wide variety of hormonal responses involving the gonads, thyroid, and pituitary, and the hypothalamus and other regions of the brain.  
  Address Human Health  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2154-8331 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2037  
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