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Author Schernhammer, E.S.; Laden, F.; Speizer, F.E.; Willett, W.C.; Hunter, D.J.; Kawachi, I.; Colditz, G.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Rotating Night Shifts and Risk of Breast Cancer in Women Participating in the Nurses' Health Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication JNCI Journal of the National Cancer Institute Abbreviated Journal JNCI Journal of the National Cancer Institute  
  Volume 93 Issue 20 Pages 1563-1568  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0027-8874 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 806  
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Author Schernhammer, E.S.; Laden, F.; Speizer, F.E.; Willett, W.C.; Hunter, D.J.; Kawachi, I.; Fuchs, C.S.; Colditz, G.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Night-Shift Work and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in the Nurses' Health Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2003 Publication JNCI Journal of the National Cancer Institute Abbreviated Journal JNCI Journal of the National Cancer Institute  
  Volume 95 Issue 11 Pages 825-828  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0027-8874 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 807  
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Author Travis, R.C.; Balkwill, A.; Fensom, G.K.; Appleby, P.N.; Reeves, G.K.; Wang, X.-S.; Roddam, A.W.; Gathani, T.; Peto, R.; Green, J.; Key, T.J.; Beral, V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Night Shift Work and Breast Cancer Incidence: Three Prospective Studies and Meta-analysis of Published Studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of the National Cancer Institute Abbreviated Journal JNCI J Natl Cancer Inst  
  Volume 108 Issue 12 Pages djw169  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Background: It has been proposed that night shift work could increase breast cancer incidence. A 2007 World Health Organization review concluded, mainly from animal evidence, that shift work involving circadian disruption is probably carcinogenic to humans. We therefore aimed to generate prospective epidemiological evidence on night shift work and breast cancer incidence.

Methods: Overall, 522 246 Million Women Study, 22 559 EPIC-Oxford, and 251 045 UK Biobank participants answered questions on shift work and were followed for incident cancer. Cox regression yielded multivariable-adjusted breast cancer incidence rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for night shift work vs no night shift work, and likelihood ratio tests for interaction were used to assess heterogeneity. Our meta-analyses combined these and relative risks from the seven previously published prospective studies (1.4 million women in total), using inverse-variance weighted averages of the study-specific log RRs.

Results: In the Million Women Study, EPIC-Oxford, and UK Biobank, respectively, 673, 28, and 67 women who reported night shift work developed breast cancer, and the RRs for any vs no night shift work were 1.00 (95% CI = 0.92 to 1.08), 1.07 (95% CI = 0.71 to 1.62), and 0.78 (95% CI = 0.61 to 1.00). In the Million Women Study, the RR for 20 or more years of night shift work was 1.00 (95% CI = 0.81 to 1.23), with no statistically significant heterogeneity by sleep patterns or breast cancer risk factors. Our meta-analysis of all 10 prospective studies included 4660 breast cancers in women reporting night shift work; compared with other women, the combined relative risks were 0.99 (95% CI = 0.95 to 1.03) for any night shift work, 1.01 (95% CI = 0.93 to 1.10) for 20 or more years of night shift work, and 1.00 (95% CI = 0.87 to 1.14) for 30 or more years.

Conclusions: The totality of the prospective evidence shows that night shift work, including long-term shift work, has little or no effect on breast cancer incidence.
 
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  ISSN 0027-8874 ISBN Medium  
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  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1540  
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Author Higuchi, S.; Fukuda, T.; Kozaki, T.; Takahashi, M.; Miura, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of a Red-visor Cap for Preventing Light-induced Melatonin Suppression during Simulated Night Work Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of PHYSIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY Abbreviated Journal J Physiol Anthropol  
  Volume 30 Issue 6 Pages 251-258  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Bright light at night improves the alertness of night workers. Melatonin suppression induced by light at night is, however, reported to be a possible risk factor for breast cancer. Short-wavelength light has a strong impact on melatonin suppression. A red-visor cap can cut the short-wavelength light from the upper visual field selectively with no adverse effects on visibility. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a red-visor cap on light-induced melatonin suppression, performance, and sleepiness at night. Eleven healthy young male adults (mean age: 21.2±0.9 yr) volunteered to participate in this study. On the first day, the subjects spent time in dim light (<15 lx) from 20:00 to 03:00 to measure baseline data of nocturnal salivary melatonin concentration. On the second day, the subjects were exposed to light for four hours from 23:00 to 03:00 with a nonvisor cap (500 lx), red-visor cap (approx. 160 lx) and blue-visor cap (approx. 160 lx). Subjective sleepiness and performance of a psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) were also measured on the second day. Compared to salivary melatonin concentration under dim light, the decrease in melatonin concentration was significant in a nonvisor cap condition but was not significant in a red-visor cap condition. The percentages of melatonin suppression in the nonvisor cap and red-visor cap conditions at 4 hours after exposure to light were 52.6±22.4% and 7.7±3.3%, respectively. The red-visor cap had no adverse effect on performance of the PVT, brightness and visual comfort, though it tended to increase subjective sleepiness. These results suggest that a red-visor cap is effective in preventing melatonin suppression with no adverse effects on vigilance performance, brightness and visibility.  
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  ISSN 1880-6791 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 521  
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Author LeBlanc, Allana G.; Gunnell, Katie E.; Prince, Stephanie A.; Saunders, Travis J.; Barnes, Joel D.; Chaput, Jean-Philippe url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Ubiquity of the Screen: An Overview of the Risks and Benefits of Screen Time in Our Modern World Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Translational Journal of the American College of Sports Medicine Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 2 Issue 17 Pages 104–113  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Sedentary behavior, and specifically screen-based sedentary behavior, has been a focus for health researchers, engineers, telecommunications companies, gamers, and the media for many years. In recent years, research in this area has proliferated at an exponential rate. On one side, arguments have been made that screen time is harmful to the healthy growth and development of children and youth. On the other side, modern technology has far surpassed any prediction of success and become a fixture of daily living, making life easier and providing opportunities never thought possible. Regardless, screens have become omnipresent in our society, and it is important to understand the risks and the benefits associated with their use. Excessive time spent in various sedentary behaviors can coexists in a lifestyle that includes sufficient levels of moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity, but research has shown that for optimal health benefits, individuals should be both physically active and limit their sedentary behaviors (especially screen time). This narrative review provides a brief history of research on sedentary behavior in the context of screen time, the evolution of screens and screen time, highlights the risks and benefits of screen-based sedentary behavior, and provides experimental evidence for reductions in habitual screen time.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1745  
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