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Author Bagci, S.; Sabir, H.; Muller, A.; Reiter, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of altered photoperiod due to COVID-19 lockdown on pregnant women and their fetuses Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Human Health; Covid-19; circadian disruption; fetus; lockdown; melatonin; pregnant Women  
  Abstract Maternal circadian rhythms provide highly important input into the entrainment and programming of fetal and newborn circadian rhythms. The light-dark cycle is an important regulator of the internal biological clock. Even though pregnant women spend a greater part of the day at home during the latter stages of pregnancy, natural light exposure is crucial for the fetus. The current recommended COVID-19 lockdown might dramatically alter normal environmental lighting conditions of pregnant women, resulting in exposure to extremely low levels of natural daylight and high-intensity artificial light sources during both day and night. This article summarizes the potential effects on pregnant woman and their fetuses due to prolonged exposure to altered photoperiod and as consequence altered circadian system, known as chronodisruption, that may result from the COVID-19 lockdown.  
  Address Department of Cell Systems and Anatomy, UT Health San Antonio , San Antonio, Texas, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32519912 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3007  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Moore-Ede, M.; Heitmann, A.; Guttkuhn, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian Potency Spectrum with Extended Exposure to Polychromatic White LED Light under Workplace Conditions Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Human Health; circadian; human; light spectrum; melatonin; spectral sensitivity  
  Abstract Electric light has enabled humans to conquer the night, but light exposure at night can disrupt the circadian timing system and is associated with a diverse range of health disorders. To provide adequate lighting for visual tasks without disrupting the human circadian timing system, a precise definition of circadian spectral sensitivity is required. Prior attempts to define the circadian spectral sensitivity curve have used short (</=90-min) monochromatic light exposures in dark-adapted human subjects or in vitro dark-adapted isolated retina or melanopsin. Several lines of evidence suggest that these dark-adapted circadian spectral sensitivity curves, in addition to 430- to 499-nm (blue) wavelength sensitivity, may include transient 400- to 429-nm (violet) and 500- to 560-nm (green) components mediated by cone- and rod-originated extrinsic inputs to intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs), which decay over the first 2 h of extended light exposure. To test the hypothesis that the human circadian spectral sensitivity in light-adapted conditions may have a narrower, predominantly blue, sensitivity, we used 12-h continuous exposures of light-adapted healthy human subjects to 6 polychromatic white light-emitting diode (LED) light sources with diverse spectral power distributions at recommended workplace levels of illumination (540 lux) to determine their effect on the area under curve of the overnight (2000-0800 h) salivary melatonin. We derived a narrow steady-state human Circadian Potency spectral sensitivity curve with a peak at 477 nm and a full-width half-maximum of 438 to 493 nm. This light-adapted Circadian Potency spectral sensitivity permits the development of spectrally engineered LED light sources to minimize circadian disruption and address the health risks of light exposure at night in our 24/7 society, by alternating between daytime circadian stimulatory white light spectra and nocturnal circadian protective white light spectra.  
  Address Data Analytics Department, Circadian Technologies, Inc., Stoneham, Massachusetts  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32539484 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3010  
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Author LeGates, T.A.; Kvarta, M.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Illuminating a path from light to depression Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication Nature Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Nat Neurosci  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Commentary; Animals; Human Health  
  Abstract Our light environment can strongly influence our mental health. Kai An and colleagues dissect the neuronal circuit mediating depression-related behaviors induced by mistimed light input in mice, implicating the nucleus accumbens as the downstream target of the neural pathway between intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells and the perihabenular nucleus.  
  Address Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1097-6256 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32555525 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3015  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Behn, C.; De Gregorio, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Melatonin Relations with Energy Metabolism as Possibly Involved in Fatal Mountain Road Traffic Accidents Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication International Journal of Molecular Sciences Abbreviated Journal Int J Mol Sci  
  Volume 21 Issue 6 Pages  
  Keywords Review; Human Health; dysrhythmia; melatonin; mountain road death  
  Abstract Previous results evidenced acute exposure to high altitude (HA) weakening the relation between daily melatonin cycle and the respiratory quotient. This review deals with the threat extreme environments pose on body time order, particularly concerning energy metabolism. Working at HA, at poles, or in space challenge our ancestral inborn body timing system. This conflict may also mark many aspects of our current lifestyle, involving shift work, rapid time zone crossing, and even prolonged office work in closed buildings. Misalignments between external and internal rhythms, in the short term, traduce into risk of mental and physical performance shortfalls, mood changes, quarrels, drug and alcohol abuse, failure to accomplish with the mission and, finally, high rates of fatal accidents. Relations of melatonin with energy metabolism being altered under a condition of hypoxia focused our attention on interactions of the indoleamine with redox state, as well as, with autonomic regulations. Individual tolerance/susceptibility to such interactions may hint at adequately dealing with body timing disorders under extreme conditions.  
  Address Laboratory of Extreme Environments, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago 8380453, Chile  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1422-0067 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32235717; PMCID:PMC7139848 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3016  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rabin, J.; Cha, C.; Nguyen, M.; Renteria, L.; Abebe, F.; Wastani, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Cool (blue) vs. warm (yellow) displays enhance visual function Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication Eye (London, England) Abbreviated Journal Eye (Lond)  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Displays emitting substantial blue light (phones, tablets, computers) can produce eyestrain (computer vision syndrome: CVS) [1, 2]. Yet findings have been challenged [3]. A metric to assess CVS is the highest detectable flicker rate (CFF). We compared the short-term effects of bluish (“cool”) vs. yellowish (“warm”) displays on high temporal frequency contrast sensitivity (TCS), which relates directly to the CFF.  
  Address University of the Incarnate Word Rosenberg School of Optometry, San Antonio, TX, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0950-222X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32029916 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3020  
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