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Author Gaydecki, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Automated moth flight analysis in the vicinity of artificial light Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Bulletin of Entomological Research Abbreviated Journal Bull Entomol Res  
  Volume 109 Issue 1 Pages 127-140  
  Keywords Instrumentation; Animals  
  Abstract Instrumentation and software for the automated analysis of insect flight trajectories is described, intended for quantifying the behavioural dynamics of moths in the vicinity of artificial light. For its time, this moth imaging system was relatively advanced and revealed hitherto undocumented insights into moth flight behaviour. The illumination source comprised a 125 W mercury vapour light, operating in the visible and near ultraviolet wavelengths, mounted on top of a mobile telescopic mast at heights of 5 and 7.1 m, depending upon the experiment. Moths were imaged in early September, at night and in field conditions, using a ground level video camera with associated optics including a heated steering mirror, wide angle lens and an electronic image intensifier. Moth flight coordinates were recorded at a rate of 50 images per second (fields) and transferred to a computer using a light pen (the only non-automated operation in the processing sequence). Software extracted ground speed vectors and, by instantaneous subtraction of wind speed data supplied by fast-response anemometers, the airspeed vectors. Accumulated density profiles of the track data revealed that moths spend most of their time at a radius of between 40 and 50 cm from the source, and rarely fly directly above it, from close range. Furthermore, the proportion of insects caught by the trap as a proportion of the number influenced by the light (and within the field of view of the camera) was very low; of 1600 individual tracks recorded over five nights, a total of only 12 were caught. Although trap efficiency is strongly dependent on trap height, time of night, season, moonlight and weather, the data analysis confirmed that moths do not exhibit straightforward positive phototaxis. In general, trajectory patterns become more complex with reduced distance from the illumination, with higher recorded values of speeds and angular velocities. However, these characteristics are further qualified by the direction of travel of the insect; the highest accelerations tended to occur when the insect was at close range, but moving away from the source. Rather than manifesting a simple positive phototaxis, the trajectories were suggestive of disorientation. Based on the data and the complex behavioural response, mathematical models were developed that described ideal density distribution in calm air and light wind speed conditions. The models did not offer a physiological hypothesis regarding the behavioural changes, but rather were tools for quantification and prediction. Since the time that the system was developed, instrumentation, computers and software have advanced considerably, allowing much more to be achieved at a small fraction of the original cost. Nevertheless, the analytical tools remain useful for automated trajectory analysis of airborne insects.  
  Address School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Manchester,Manchester M13 9PL,UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0007-4853 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29745349 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1895  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jechow, A.; Kyba, C.; Hölker, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Beyond All-Sky: Assessing Ecological Light Pollution Using Multi-Spectral Full-Sphere Fisheye Lens Imaging Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Imaging Abbreviated Journal J. Imaging  
  Volume 5 Issue 4 Pages 46  
  Keywords Instrumentation; Skyglow  
  Abstract Artificial light at night is a novel anthropogenic stressor. The resulting ecological light pollution affects a wide breadth of biological systems on many spatio-temporal scales, from individual organisms to communities and ecosystems. However, a widely-applicable measurement method for nocturnal light providing spatially resolved full-spectrum radiance over the full solid angle is still missing. Here, we explain the first step to fill this gap, by using a commercial digital camera with a fisheye lens to acquire vertical plane multi-spectral (RGB) images covering the full solid angle. We explain the technical and practical procedure and software to process luminance and correlated color temperature maps and derive illuminance. We discuss advantages and limitations and present data from different night-time lighting situations. The method provides a comprehensive way to characterize nocturnal light in the context of ecological light pollution. It is affordable, fast, mobile, robust, and widely-applicable by non-experts for field work.  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2313-433X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2327  
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Author Fiorentin, P.; Bertolo, A.; Cavazzani, S.; Ortolani, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Calibration of digital compact cameras for sky quality measures Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Skyglow; Instrumentation  
  Abstract This work presents the possibility of using the extremely popular compact digital cameras of smartphones or action cameras to perform sky photometry. The newest generation of these devices allows to save raw images. They are not as good as digital single-lens reflex camera, in particular in terms of sensitivity, noise and pixel depth (10 bit versus 12 bit or more), but they have the advantage of being extremely widespread on the population and relatively cheap. These economical digital compact cameras work with an electronic shutter, it overcomes the consumption of mechanics and allows to gather images for long time. The work uses a simple calibration method to transfer raw data from the proprietary RGB color space to the standard CIE 1931 color space. It allows the measurement of sky luminance in cd m−2 with an expected uncertainty of about 20%. Furthermore, the colorimetric calibration allows to know the correlated color temperature of a portion of the sky, it can help the identification of the kind of polluting sources. Aiming at better clarifying the performances of calibrated digital compact cameras, a comparison with a calibrated DSLR camera is presented in outdoor situations showing a good agreement both for luminance and color temperature measurements.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3063  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bará, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Characterizing the zenithal night sky brightness in large territories: how many samples per square kilometre are needed? Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 473 Issue 3 Pages 4164-4173  
  Keywords Instrumentation; atmospheric effects; light pollution; numerical methods; photometry  
  Abstract A recurring question arises when trying to characterize, by means of measurements or theoretical calculations, the zenithal night sky brightness throughout a large territory: how many samples per square kilometre are needed? The optimum sampling distance should allow reconstructing, with sufficient accuracy, the continuous zenithal brightness map across the whole region, whilst at the same time avoiding unnecessary and redundant oversampling. This paper attempts to provide some tentative answers to this issue, using two complementary tools: the luminance structure function and the Nyquist–Shannon spatial sampling theorem. The analysis of several regions of the world, based on the data from the New world atlas of artificial night sky brightness, suggests that, as a rule of thumb, about one measurement per square kilometre could be sufficient for determining the zenithal night sky brightness of artificial origin at any point in a region to within ±0.1 magV arcsec–2 (in the root-mean-square sense) of its true value in the Johnson–Cousins V band. The exact reconstruction of the zenithal night sky brightness maps from samples taken at the Nyquist rate seems to be considerably more demanding.  
  Address 1Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain; salva.bara(at)usc.es  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Oxford Academic Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2164  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kruse, F.A.; Elvidge, C.D. url  openurl
  Title (up) Characterizing urban light sources using imaging spectrometry Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Proceedings of the Joint Urban Remote Sensing Event 2011, April 13-11, Munich, Germany Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 149 - 152  
  Keywords Instrumentation  
  Abstract Remote mapping of night lights has been used for decades for mapping urbanization and the global distribution of human activity. Most of this has been accomplished using remote sensing data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP). The coarse spatial and spectral resolution of DMSP, however, has precluded discrimination of lighting types or spectral characteristics. Recent demonstrations using photography from the International Space Station and airborne multispectral simulations demonstrate significant potential, but high-spectral-resolution field and laboratory measurements indicate that these methods do not take full advantage of the spectral information available. This research demonstrates the use of imaging spectrometer data to identify, characterize, and map urban lighting based on spectral emission lines unique to specific lighting types. ProSpecTIR imaging spectrometer data were analyzed to extract spectral features and these were compared to spectral library measurements on a pixel-by-pixel basis, resulting in a detailed spatial map showing different lighting types. The nature and distribution of lights can be used as a surrogate for measurement of urban development.  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 469  
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