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Author Jechow, A.; Kolláth, Z.; Lerner, A.; Hänel, A.; Shashar, N.; Hölker, F.; Kyba, C.C.M. openurl 
  Title (up) Measuring Light Pollution with Fisheye Lens Imagery from A Moving Boat–A Proof of Concept Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Sustainable Lighting Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages 15-25  
  Keywords Skyglow; Instrumentation  
  Abstract Near all-sky imaging photometry was performed from a boat on the Gulf of Aqaba to measure the night sky brightness in a coastal environment. The boat was not anchored, and therefore drifted and rocked. The camera was mounted on a tripod without any inertia/motion stabilization. A commercial digital single lens reflex (DSLR) camera and fisheye lens were used with ISO setting of 6400, with the exposure time varied between 0.5 s and 5 s. We find that despite movement of the vessel the measurements produce quantitatively comparable results apart from saturation effects. We discuss the potential and limitations of this method for mapping light pollution in marine and freshwater systems. This work represents the proof of concept that all-sky photometry with a commercial DSLR camera is a viable tool to determine light pollution in an ecological context from a moving boat.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2151  
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Author Müller, A.; Wuchterl, G.; Sarazin, M. url  openurl
  Title (up) Measuring the Night Sky Brightness with the Lightmeter. Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication ReVMexAA Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 41 Issue Pages 46–49  
  Keywords Instrumentation; instrumentation: photometers; light pollution; methods: data analysis; methods: observational; site testing  
  Abstract We present a newly developed, low-cost photometer for long-term monitoring of the night sky brightness and

light pollution on Earth. The so-called Lightmeter is an as far as possible stand-alone operational, fully

weatherproof, and maintenance-free device. It provides a high data sampling rate of up to 1 Hz as well as a

superb sensitivity covering the whole brightness range down to the darkest night time conditions. The excellent

performance of the Lightmeter allows a continuously monitoring of the night sky brightness and opens a wide

range of applications at an observatory site like determining overall sky conditions in real time, cloud detection

and estimation of their velocity, measuring relative changes in extinction as well as the detection of long term

trends in brightness caused by an increase of artificial illumination. We will present first results of measurements

taken at Cerro Armazones, one of the best obser
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 471  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Barentine, J.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Methods for Assessment and Monitoring of Light Pollution around Ecologically Sensitive Sites Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Imaging Abbreviated Journal J. Imaging  
  Volume 5 Issue 5 Pages 54  
  Keywords Instrumentation; Skyglow; Remote Sensing; Review  
  Abstract Since the introduction of electric lighting over a century ago, and particularly in the decades following the Second World War, indications of artificial light on the nighttime Earth as seen from Earth orbit have increased at a rate exceeding that of world population growth during the same period. Modification of the natural photic environment at night is a clear and imminent consequence of the proliferation of anthropogenic light at night into outdoor spaces, and with this unprecedented change comes a host of known and suspected ecological consequences. In the past two decades, the conservation community has gradually come to view light pollution as a threat requiring the development of best management practices. Establishing those practices demands a means of quantifying the problem, identifying polluting sources, and monitoring the evolution of their impacts through time. The proliferation of solid-state lighting and the changes to source spectral power distribution it has brought relative to legacy lighting technologies add the complication of color to the overall situation. In this paper, I describe the challenge of quantifying light pollution threats to ecologically-sensitive sites in the context of efforts to conserve natural nighttime darkness, assess the current state of the art in detection and imaging technology as applied to this realm, review some recent innovations, and consider future prospects for imaging approaches to provide substantial support for darkness conservation initiatives around the world.  
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  ISSN 2313-433X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2498  
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Author Voigt, L.P.; Reynolds, K.; Mehryar, M.; Chan, W.S.; Kostelecky, N.; Pastores, S.M.; Halpern, N.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Monitoring sound and light continuously in an intensive care unit patient room: A pilot study Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of Critical Care Abbreviated Journal Journal of Critical Care  
  Volume 38 Issue 21 Pages 5952-5961  
  Keywords Instrumentation; Human Health  
  Abstract Purpose

To determine the feasibility of continuous recording of sound and light in the intensive care unit (ICU).

Materials and Methods

Four one-hour baseline scenarios in an empty ICU patient room by day and night (doors open or closed and maximal or minimal lighting) and two daytime scenarios simulating a stable and unstable patient (quiet or loud devices and staff) were conducted. Sound and light levels were continuously recorded using a commercially available multisensor monitor and transmitted via the hospital's network to a cloud-based data storage and management system.

Results

The empty ICU room was loud with similar mean sound levels for the day and night simulations of 45–46 dBA. Mean levels for maximal lighting during day and night ranged from 1306–1812 lux and mean levels for minimum lighting were 1–3 lux. The mean sound levels for the stable and unstable patient simulations were 61 and 81 dBA, respectively. The mean light levels were 349 lux for the stable patient and 1947 lux for the unstable patient.

Conclusions

Combined sound and light can be continuously and easily monitored in the ICU setting. Incorporating sound and light monitors in ICU rooms may promote an enhanced patient and staff centered healing environment.
 
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  ISSN 0883-9441 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1614  
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Author Bará, S.; Rigueiro, I.; Lima, R.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Monitoring transition: Expected night sky brightness trends in different photometric bands Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer  
  Volume 239 Issue Pages 106644  
  Keywords Skyglow; Remote Sensing; Instrumentation  
  Abstract Several light pollution indicators are commonly used to monitor the effects of the transition from outdoor lighting systems based on traditional gas-discharge lamps to solid-state light sources. In this work we analyze a subset of these indicators, including the artificial zenithal night sky brightness in the visual photopic and scotopic bands, the brightness in the specific photometric band of the widely used Sky Quality Meter (SQM), and the top-of-atmosphere radiance detected by the VIIRS-DNB radiometer onboard the satellite Suomi-NPP. Using a single-scattering approximation in a layered atmosphere we quantitatively show that, depending on the transition scenarios, these indicators may show different, even opposite behaviors. This is mainly due to the combined effects of the changes in the sources' spectra and angular radiation patterns, the wavelength-dependent atmospheric propagation processes and the differences in the detector spectral sensitivity bands. It is suggested that the possible presence of this differential behavior should be taken into account when evaluating light pollution indicator datasets for assessing the outcomes of public policy decisions regarding the upgrading of outdoor lighting systems.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2810  
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