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Author Bará, S.; Aubé, M.; Barentine, J.; Zamorano, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Magnitude to luminance conversions and visual brightness of the night sky Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal MNRAS  
  Volume 493 Issue 2 Pages 2429–2437  
  Keywords Skyglow; light pollution; atmospheric effects; techniques: photometric; methods: numerical; luminance  
  Abstract The visual brightness of the night sky is not a single-valued function of its brightness in other photometric bands, because the transformations between photometric systems depend on the spectral power distribution of the skyglow. We analyze the transformation between the night sky brightness in the Johnson-Cousins V band (mV, measured in magnitudes per square arcsecond, mpsas) and its visual luminance (L, in SI units cd m−2) for observers with photopic and scotopic adaptation, in terms of the spectral power distribution of the incident light. We calculate the zero-point luminances for a set of skyglow spectra recorded at different places in the world, including strongly light-polluted locations and sites with nearly pristine natural dark skies. The photopic skyglow luminance corresponding to mV = 0.00 mpsas is found to vary between 1.11–1.34 × 105 cd m−2 if mV is reported in the absolute (AB) magnitude scale, and between 1.18–1.43 × 105 cd m−2 if a Vega scale for mV is used instead. The photopic luminance for mV = 22.0 mpsas is correspondingly comprised between 176 and 213 μcd m−2 (AB), or 187 and 227 μcd m−2 (Vega). These constants tend to decrease for increasing correlated color temperatures (CCT). The photopic zero-point luminances are generally higher than the ones expected for blackbody radiation of comparable CCT. The scotopic-to-photopic luminance ratio (S/P) for our spectral dataset varies from 0.8 to 2.5. Under scotopic adaptation the dependence of the zero-point luminances with the CCT, and their values relative to blackbody radiation, are reversed with respect to photopic ones.  
  Address Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia; salva.bara(at)usc.gal  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Oxford Academic Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2825  
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Author Kocifaj, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Modelling the spectral behaviour of night skylight close to artificial light sources Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal MNRAS  
  Volume 403 Issue 4 Pages 2105-2110  
  Keywords scattering; atmospheric effects; light pollution; methods: numerical; Modeling  
  Abstract Spectral features of the night sky are simulated under cloudless conditions. Numerical runs show that spectral composition of the diffuse light changes over the whole sky and sky radiances quickly respond to altering aerosol characteristics, such as the asymmetry parameter, single scattering albedo and total optical thickness. The general trend is a steep decrease of diffuse irradiance with a distance from the city centre. Powerstar HQI-NDL lamps produce more light at short wavelengths, thus implying the higher levels of light pollution. The red light may markedly contribute to the obtrusive light if Vialox NAV-4Y lamps are considered as a prevailing source of light in the model town. In a non-turbid atmosphere, the minimum radiance is notoriously observed close to the zenith. As aerosol loading increases, the minimum radiance is shifted to larger zenith angles at the opposite side of the light source. Obtained results may serve as corrections to spectrophotometry data, as the light pollution can be easily calculated for any sky element and for any spectral band.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 276  
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Author Kocifaj, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A numerical experiment on light pollution from distant sources: Light pollution from distant sources Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal MNRAS  
  Volume 415 Issue 4 Pages 3609-3615  
  Keywords scattering; atmospheric effects; light pollution; methods: numerical; skyglow; modeling  
  Abstract To predict the light pollution of the night-time sky realistically over any location or measuring point on the ground presents quite a difficult calculation task. Light pollution of the local atmosphere is caused by stray light, light loss or reflection of artificially illuminated ground objects or surfaces such as streets, advertisement boards or building interiors. Thus it depends on the size, shape, spatial distribution, radiative pattern and spectral characteristics of many neighbouring light sources. The actual state of the atmospheric environment and the orography of the surrounding terrain are also relevant. All of these factors together influence the spectral sky radiance/luminance in a complex manner. Knowledge of the directional behaviour of light pollution is especially important for the correct interpretation of astronomical observations. From a mathematical point of view, the light noise or veil luminance of a specific sky element is given by a superposition of scattered light beams. Theoretical models that simulate light pollution typically take into account all ground-based light sources, thus imposing great requirements on CPU and MEM. As shown in this paper, a contribution of distant sources to the light pollution might be essential under specific conditions of low turbidity and/or Garstang-like radiative patterns. To evaluate the convergence of the theoretical model, numerical experiments are made for different light sources, spectral bands and atmospheric conditions. It is shown that in the worst case the integration limit is approximately 100 km, but it can be significantly shortened for light sources with cosine-like radiative patterns.  
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  ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 267  
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Author Kocifaj, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Two-stream approximation for rapid modeling the light pollution levels in local atmosphere Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Astrophysics and Space Science Abbreviated Journal Astrophys Space Sci  
  Volume 341 Issue 2 Pages 301-307  
  Keywords Light pollution; Atmospheric effects; Methods: numerical; Radiative transfer; Scattering; modeling; two-stream approximation  
  Abstract The two-stream concept is used for modeling the radiative transfer in Earth's atmosphere illuminated by ground-based light sources. The light pollution levels (illuminance and irradiance) are computed for various aerosol microphysical parameters, specifically the asymmetry parameter g A , single scattering albedo ω A , and optical thickness τ A . Two distinct size distributions of Junge's and gamma-type are employed. Rather then being a monotonic function of τ A , the diffuse illuminance/irradiance shows a local minimum at specific τ A, lim independent of size distribution taken into consideration. The existence of local minima has relation to the scattering and attenuation efficiencies both of which have opposite effects. The computational scheme introduced in this paper is advantageous especially if the entire set of calculations needs to be repeated with an aim to simulate diffuse light in various situations and when altering optical states of the atmospheric environment.  
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  ISSN 0004-640X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 273  
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Author Kocifaj, M.; Solano Lamphar, H.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Quantitative analysis of night skyglow amplification under cloudy conditions Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society  
  Volume 443 Issue 4 Pages 3665-3674  
  Keywords Skyglow; radiative transfer; scattering; atmospheric effects; light pollution; methods: numerical  
  Abstract The radiance produced by artificial light is a major source of nighttime over-illumination. It can, however, be treated experimentally using ground-based and satellite data. These two types of data complement each other and together have a high information content. For instance, the satellite data enable upward light emissions to be normalized, and this in turn allows skyglow levels at the ground to be modelled under cloudy or overcast conditions. Excessive night lighting imposes an unacceptable burden on nature, humans and professional astronomy. For this reason, there is a pressing need to determine the total amount of downwelling diffuse radiation. Undoubtedly, cloudy periods can cause a significant increase in skyglow as a result of amplification owing to diffuse reflection from clouds. While it is recognized that the amplification factor (AF) varies with cloud cover, the effects of different types of clouds, of atmospheric turbidity and of the geometrical relationships between the positions of an individual observer, the cloud layer, and the light source are in general poorly known. In this paper the AF is quantitatively analysed considering different aerosol optical depths (AODs), urban layout sizes and cloud types with specific albedos and altitudes. The computational results show that the AF peaks near the edges of a city rather than at its centre. In addition, the AF appears to be a decreasing function of AOD, which is particularly important when modelling the skyglow in regions with apparent temporal or seasonal variability of atmospheric turbidity. The findings in this paper will be useful to those designing engineering applications or modelling light pollution, as well as to astronomers and environmental scientists who aim to predict the amplification of skyglow caused by clouds. In addition, the semi-analytical formulae can be used to estimate the AF levels, especially in densely populated metropolitan regions for which detailed computations may be CPU-intensive. These new results are of theoretical and experimental significance as they will motivate experimentalists to collect data from various regions to build an overall picture of the AF, and will encourage modellers to test the consistency with theoretical predictions.  
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  ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 538  
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