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Author (up) Datta, S.; Samanta, D.; Tiwary, B.; Chaudhuri, A.G.; Chakrabarti, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sex and estrous cycle dependent changes in locomotor activity, anxiety and memory performance in aged mice after exposure of light at night Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Behavioural Brain Research Abbreviated Journal Behav Brain Res  
  Volume 365 Issue Pages 198-209  
  Keywords Animals; mouse models; locomotor activities  
  Abstract Light-at-night (LAN) can affect mammalian behaviour. But, the effects of LAN on aged rodents remain undefined yet. In the present investigation, aged Swiss Albino mice, habituated in regular light-dark cycle, were exposed to bright-light-pulse (1-hr) at night on the day of study followed by experimentations for assessment of locomotor activities in the open field, anxiety in the elevated plus maze and short-term memory for novel object recognition (NOR) in the habituated field. Under without-bright-light exposure, (a) aged proestrous females showed greater locomotor activities and less anxiety than in aged diestrous females, (b) aged males showed locomotor activities and anxiety level similar to aged diestrous females and aged proestrous females respectively and (c) all animals failed to retain in object discrimination memory. LAN exposure exhibited the continual failure of such retention of memory while animals showed free and spontaneous exploration with thigmotactic behaviour having no object bias and/or phobia, but time stay in objects by animals altered variably among sexes and stages of estrous cycle. Overall, the LAN caused (a) diminution in locomotor activities, rise in anxiety and failure of memory for recognition of both familiar and novel objects in aged proestrous females, (b) hyperlocomotor activities and reduction in anxiety in both males and diestrous females with the failure of memory for recognition of novel objects only in aged males while diestrous females showed enhanced exploration time to both objects during NOR. Thus, nocturnal behaviour of aged mice varies with sex and estrous cycle and light acts differentially on them.  
  Address University of Calcutta, Department of Physiology, 92, APC Road, Kolkata, 700009, West Bengal, India. Electronic address: ncphysiolcu@gmail.com  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0166-4328 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30853396 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2259  
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Author (up) Fonken, L.K.; Finy, M.S.; Walton, J.C.; Weil, Z.M.; Workman, J.L.; Ross, J.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Influence of light at night on murine anxiety- and depressive-like responses Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Behavioural Brain Research Abbreviated Journal Behav Brain Res  
  Volume 205 Issue 2 Pages 349-354  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Anxiety/*physiopathology; Corticosterone/blood; Depression/*physiopathology; Dietary Sucrose/administration & dosage; Drinking Behavior/physiology; Light/*adverse effects; Lighting; Locomotion/physiology; Male; Maze Learning; Mice; Neuropsychological Tests; Organ Size; Photic Stimulation; *Photoperiod; Random Allocation; Swimming; Testis/pathology  
  Abstract Individuals are increasingly exposed to light at night. Exposure to constant light (LL) disrupts circadian rhythms of locomotor activity, body temperature, hormones, and the sleep-wake cycle in animals. Other behavioural responses to LL have been reported, but are inconsistent. The present experiment sought to determine whether LL produces changes in affective responses and whether behavioural changes are mediated by alterations in glucocorticoid concentrations. Relative to conspecifics maintained in a light/dark cycle (LD, 16:8 light/dark), male Swiss-Webster mice exposed to LL for three weeks increased depressive-like behavioural responses as evaluated by the forced swim test and sucrose anhedonia. Furthermore, providing a light escape tube reversed the effects of LL in the forced swim test. LL mice displayed reduced anxiety as evaluated by the open field and elevated-plus maze. Glucocorticoid concentrations were reduced in the LL group suggesting that the affective behavioural responses to LL are not the result of elevated corticosterone. Additionally, mice housed in LD with a clear tube displayed increased paired testes mass as compared to LL mice. Taken together, these data provide evidence that exposure to unnatural lighting can induce significant changes in affect, increasing depressive-like and decreasing anxiety-like responses.  
  Address Department of Psychology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. Fonken.1@osu.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0166-4328 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:19591880 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 749  
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Author (up) Fonken, L.K.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dim light at night increases depressive-like responses in male C3H/HeNHsd mice Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Behavioural Brain Research Abbreviated Journal Behav Brain Res  
  Volume 243 Issue Pages 74-78  
  Keywords Affect/physiology; Anhedonia/physiology; Animals; Behavior, Animal/*physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Depression/*etiology/physiopathology; Hippocampus/*metabolism/pathology; Light/*adverse effects; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred C3H; Neuropsychological Tests; Photoperiod  
  Abstract Daily patterns of light exposure have become increasingly variable since the widespread adoption of electrical lighting during the 20th century. Seasonal fluctuations in light exposure, shift-work, and transmeridian travel are all associated with alterations in mood. These studies implicate fluctuations in environmental lighting in the development of depressive disorders. Here we argue that exposure to light at night (LAN) may be causally linked to depression. Male C3H/HeNHsd mice, which produce nocturnal melatonin, were housed in either a standard light/dark (LD) cycle or exposed to nightly dim (5 lux) LAN (dLAN). After four weeks in lighting conditions mice underwent behavioral testing and hippocampal tissue was collected at the termination of the study for qPCR. Here were report that mice exposed to dLAN increase depressive-like responses in both a sucrose anhedonia and forced swim test. In contrast to findings in diurnal grass rats, dLAN mice perform comparably to mice housed under dark nights in a hippocampus-dependent learning and memory task. TNFalpha and IL1beta gene expression do not differ between groups, demonstrating that changes in these pro-inflammatory cytokines do not mediate dLAN induced depressive-like responses in mice. BDNF expression is reduced in the hippocampus of mice exposed to dLAN. These results indicate that low levels of LAN can alter mood in mice. This study along with previous work implicates LAN as a potential factor contributing to depression. Further understanding of the mechanisms through which LAN contributes to changes in mood is important for characterizing and treating depressive disorders.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research, Wexner Medical Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. fonken.1@osu.edu  
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  ISSN 0166-4328 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:23291153 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 95  
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Author (up) Hoffmann, K. url  openurl
  Title Photoperiod, Pineal, Melatonin and Reproduction in Hamsters Type Journal Article
  Year 1979 Publication Progress in Brain Research Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 52 Issue Pages 397–415  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract This chapter discusses the experiments done on male hamsters. It should be noted, however, that corresponding results have been obtained in females in nearly all cases, regardless of whether photoperiodic effects, the results after pineal manipulations or after application of melatonin are considered. Many mammalian species show a marked annual cycle of gonadal and other functions. In a number of cases it has been shown that the photoperiod, that is, the length of the daily light cycle and its changes, are involved in the regulation of this cycle. The pineal has been shown to participate in the transduction of photoperiodic effects of short photoperiods leading to regression and also of long photoperiods stimulating recrudescence. The latter effect is not only a suppression of antigonadotrophic effects from the pineal, but a positive stimulation. The exact role of melatonin in the photoperiodic mechanism and its site of action are still unclear. Strong effects of melatonin application have been found in photoperiodic mammals. Recent experiments suggest that not only the amount of melatonin, but its pattern of synthesis and release may be important in the conveyance of photoperiodic effects. No support for the assumption that the site of action of melatonin is the pineal itself has been found in experiments with pinealectomized animals.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 424  
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Author (up) Hogan, M.K.; Kovalycsik, T.; Sun, Q.; Rajagopalan, S.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Combined effects of exposure to dim light at night and fine particulate matter on C3H/HeNHsd mice Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Behavioural Brain Research Abbreviated Journal Behav Brain Res  
  Volume 294 Issue Pages 81-88  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Air and light pollution contribute to fetal abnormalities, increase prevalence of cancer, metabolic and cardiorespiratory diseases, and central nervous system (CNS) disorders. A component of air pollution, particulate matter, and the phenomenon of dim light at night (dLAN) both result in neuroinflammation, which has been implicated in several CNS disorders. The combinatorial role of these pollutants on health outcomes has not been assessed. Male C3H/HeNHsd mice, with intact melatonin production, were used to model humans exposed to circadian disruption by dLAN and contaminated environmental air. We hypothesized exposure to 2.5mum of particulate matter (PM2.5) and dLAN (5lx) combines to upregulate neuroinflammatory cytokine expression and alter hippocampal morphology compared to mice exposed to filtered air (FA) and housed under dark nights (LD). We also hypothesized that exposure to PM2.5 and dLAN provokes anxiety-like and depressive-like responses. For four weeks, four groups of mice were simultaneously exposed to ambient concentrated PM2.5 or FA and/or dLAN or LD. Following exposure, mice underwent several behavioral assays and hippocampi were collected for qPCR and morphological analyses. Our results are generally comparable to previous PM2.5 and dLAN reports conducted on mice and implicate PM2.5 and dLAN as potential factors contributing to depression and anxiety. Short-term exposure to PM2.5 and dLAN upregulated neuroinflammatory cytokines and altered CA1 hippocampal structural changes, as well as provoked depressive-like responses (anhedonia). However, combined, PM2.5 and dLAN exposure did not have additive effects, as hypothesized, suggesting a ceiling effect of neuroinflammation may exist in response to multiple pollutants.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Group, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0166-4328 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:26235330 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1233  
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