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Author Barentine, J.C.; Walker, C.E.; Kocifaj, M.; Kundracik, F.; Juan, A.; Kanemoto, J.; Monrad, C.K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Skyglow Changes Over Tucson, Arizona, Resulting From A Municipal LED Street Lighting Conversion Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer  
  Volume 212 Issue Pages 10-23  
  Keywords Skyglow; Tucson; Arizona; LED; modeling; radiative transfer; LED  
  Abstract The transition from earlier lighting technologies to white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is a significant change in the use of artificial light at night. LEDs emit considerably more short-wavelength light into the environment than earlier technologies on a per-lumen basis. Radiative transfer models predict increased skyglow over cities transitioning to LED unless the total lumen output of new lighting systems is reduced. The City of Tucson, Arizona (U.S.), recently converted its municipal street lighting system from a mixture of fully shielded high- and low-pressure sodium (HPS/LPS) luminaires to fully shielded 3000 K white LED luminaires. The lighting design intended to minimize increases to skyglow in order to protect the sites of nearby astronomical observatories without compromising public safety. This involved the migration of over 445 million fully shielded HPS/LPS lumens to roughly 142 million fully shielded 3000 K white LED lumens and an expected concomitant reduction in the amount of visual skyglow over Tucson. SkyGlow Simulator models predict skyglow decreases on the order of 10-20% depending on whether fully shielded or partly shielded lights are in use. We tested this prediction using visual night sky brightness estimates and luminance-calibrated, panchromatic all-sky imagery at 15 locations in and near the city. Data were obtained in 2014, before the LED conversion began, and in mid-2017 after approximately 95% of  ~18,000 luminaires was converted. Skyglow differed marginally, and in all cases with valid data changed by  <±20%. Over the same period, the city’s upward-directed optical radiance detected from Earth orbit decreased by approximately 7%. While these results are not conclusive, they suggest that LED conversions paired with dimming can reduce skyglow over cities.  
  Address International Dark-Sky Association, 3223 N 1st Ave, Tucson, AZ, 85719 USA; john(at)darksky.org  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1819  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Massetti, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Drivers of artificial light at night variability in urban, rural and remote areas Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract Light pollution generated by the excessive use of artificial light at night is an environmental and ecological concern. Artificial light at night is diffused far from the sources, for long distances by scattering in the atmosphere (skyglow), thus affecting the night sky and the biodiversity of rural and natural areas. The characterization of the level and variability of light pollution has become an important issue for several disciplines.

This study analyzes light pollution in urban, rural and remote sites in Tuscany (Italy) by monitoring night sky brightness. Night sky brightness (NSB) data collected from 2016 to 2019 were analyzed to assess annual and seasonal variability at each site and between sites. The relationship between night sky brightness and moonlight and weather conditions were also analyzed. Trend analysis was also performed to evaluate the degradation of the quality of the measurement with time due to dirty accumulation on the sensor shield.

NSB in Tuscany during moonless nights ranged between 17.3 and 21.8 mpsas. The monthly cycle of moonlight is the main driver of night sky brightness variability in the remote site (21.8 mpsas on moonless nights and 18.5 mpsas on full moon nights) with a slight, but significant darkening effect during rainy conditions (22.3 mpsas). In urban sites, moonlight cycle is almost completely masked by weather conditions, as it can be seen from the analysis of seasonal variability, lunar monthly cycle analysis and weather condition analysis. Average night sky brightness on rainy days might reach 15.4 mpsas (approximately 436 times brighter than the natural background), an intensity that is even higher than average night sky brightness in full moonlight at the same site (16.6 mpsas). Light pollution can reach levels that might affect nocturnal species, and therefore the study of long term variability of light pollution is important for ecological studies.
 
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  ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3069  
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Author Cinzano, P.; Falchi, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Toward an atlas of the number of visible stars Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer  
  Volume in press Issue Pages 107059  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract Modelling techniques for the propagation of light pollution in the atmosphere allow the computation of maps of artificial night sky brightness in any direction of the sky, involving a large number of details from satellite data. Cinzano et al. (2001a) introduced a method of mapping naked eye star visibility at the zenith from large areas based on satellite radiance measurements and Garstang models of the propagation of light pollution. It takes into account the altitude of each land area from digital elevation data, natural sky brightness in the chosen sky direction based on the Garstang approach, eye capability after Garstang and Schaefer, and atmospheric extinction in the visual photometric band. Here we discuss how to use these methods to obtain maps of the average number of visible stars when looking at the night sky hemisphere, finally answering, site by site, the question of how many stars are visible in the sky. This is not trivial, as the number of stars visible depends on the limiting magnitude in each direction in the sky, and this depends on sky brightness in that direction, atmospheric extinction at that zenith distance and the observer's visual acuity and experience. We present, as an example, a map of the number of visible stars in Italy to an average observer on clear nights with a resolution of approximately 1 km.  
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  ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2928  
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Author Kolláth, K.; Kolláth, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title On the feasibility of using ceilometer backscatter profile as input data for skyglow simulation Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Skyglow; Instrumentation  
  Abstract Atmospheric conditions can significantly affect the sky brightness originating from artificial lights. Previous works studied the cloudiness, cloud base height, optical depth of cloud, aerosol optical depth and aerosol scale height as atmospheric parameters affecting night sky brightness. Instead of using these parameters as a simplification of the real cloud and aerosol profile, we processed the raw backscatter data of a laser ceilometer instrument. Sky brightness was obtained from camera images available at the same meteorological observation site. Case studies are shown in selected cases, where we analyzed the correspondences with the backscatter data and the camera images. We performed Monte Carlo simulations with the dominant light sources to verify the numerical predictions of sky radiances. Although the limitations of the ceilometer device to obtain optical properties of the atmosphere, ceilometers provide valuable source of data for evaluation of the light pollution measurements.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2994  
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Author Tong, K.P.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Heygster, G.; Kuechly, H.U.; Notholt, J.; Kolláth, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Angular distribution of upwelling artificial light in Europe as observed by Suomi–NPP satellite Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Skyglow  
  Abstract Measuring the angular distribution of upwelling artificial light is important for modeling light pollution, because the direction of emission affects how light propagates in the atmosphere. We characterize the angular distributions of upwelling artificial light for Europe and northern Africa in 2018, based on night time radiance data for clear nights without twilight and moonlight from the VIIRS–DNB sensor on board the Suomi NPP satellite. We find that in general, suburban areas of major cities emit more light at larger zenith angles, whereas the opposite can be seen at the city centers, where the highest radiance is directed upward. The mean numbers of overflights for the year is 83, meaning that there are on average approximately seven suitable overflights per month. Future analysis may consider using moonlight models to compensate for the retrieval of moonlit scenes and analyzing data from different years in order to expand the amount of available data. As the VIIRS–DNB sensor on board the NOAA–20 satellite (launched 2017) has almost the same design, this method can also be extended to the data taken by NOAA–20.  
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  ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2880  
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