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Author (up) Atkinson, G.; Davenne, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Relationships between sleep, physical activity and human health Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Physiology & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Physiol Behav  
  Volume 90 Issue 2-3 Pages 229-235  
  Keywords Human Health; Activity Cycles/*physiology; Animals; Body Temperature/physiology; Exercise/*physiology; Health; Humans; Motor Activity/physiology; Pineal Gland/physiology; Sleep/*physiology; Wakefulness/physiology  
  Abstract Although sleep and exercise may seem to be mediated by completely different physiological mechanisms, there is growing evidence for clinically important relationships between these two behaviors. It is known that passive body heating facilitates the nocturnal sleep of healthy elderly people with insomnia. This finding supports the hypothesis that changes in body temperature trigger somnogenic brain areas to initiate sleep. Nevertheless, little is known about how the core and distal thermoregulatory responses to exercise fit into this hypothesis. Such knowledge could also help in reducing sleep problems associated with nocturnal shiftwork. It is difficult to incorporate physical activity into a shiftworker's lifestyle, since it is already disrupted in terms of family commitments and eating habits. A multi-research strategy is needed to identify what the optimal amounts and timing of physical activity are for reducing shiftwork-related sleep problems. The relationships between sleep, exercise and diet are also important, given the recently reported associations between short sleep length and obesity. The cardiovascular safety of exercise timing should also be considered, since recent data suggest that the reactivity of blood pressure to a change in general physical activity is highest during the morning. This time is associated with an increased risk in general of a sudden cardiac event, but more research work is needed to separate the influences of light, posture and exercise per se on the haemodynamic responses to sleep and physical activity following sleep taken at night and during the day as a nap.  
  Address Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Henry Cotton Campus, Webster Street, Liverpool L3 2ET, UK. G.Atkinson@ljmu.ac.uk  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN 0031-9384 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:17067643; PMCID:PMC2782301 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 717  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Baatrup, E.; Bayley, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Quantitative analysis of spider locomotion employing computer-automated video tracking Type Journal Article
  Year 1993 Publication Physiology & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Physiology & Behavior  
  Volume 54 Issue 1 Pages 83-90  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The locomotor activity of adult specimens of the wolf spider Pardosa amentata was measured in an open-field setup, using computer-automated colour object video tracking. The x,y coordinates of the animal in the digitized image of the test arena were recorded three times per second during four consecutive 12-h periods, alternating between white and red (lambda > 600 nm) illumination. Male spiders were significantly more locomotor active than female spiders under both lighting conditions. They walked, on average, twice the distance of females, employed higher velocities, and spent less time in quiescence. Both male and female P. amentata were significantly less active in red light (simulated dark environment) than in white light. The results also revealed that P. amentata administers its walking velocity and periods of quiescence according to consistent distributions, which can be approximated by simple mathematical expressions. It was found that this species spends exponentially decreasing time at increasing velocities. The number of quiescent periods, however, follow a power decay distribution at increasing quiescent period duration.  
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  ISSN 0031-9384 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 663  
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Author (up) Cleary-Gaffney, M.; Coogan, A.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Limited evidence for affective and diurnal rhythm responses to dim light-at-night in male and female C57Bl/6 mice Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Physiology & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Physiol Behav  
  Volume 189 Issue Pages 78-85  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Circadian rhythms are recurring patterns in a range of behavioural, physiological and molecular parameters that display periods of near 24h, and are underpinned by an endogenous biological timekeeping system. Circadian clocks are increasingly recognised as being key for health. Environmental light is the key stimulus that synchronises the internal circadian system with the external time cues. There are emergent health concerns regarding increasing worldwide prevalence of electric lighting, especially man-made light-at-night, and light's impact on the circadian system may be central to these effects. A number of previous studies have demonstrated increased depression-like behaviour in various rodent experimental models exposed to dim light-at-night. In this study we set out to study the impact of dim light-at-night on circadian and affective behaviours in C57Bl/6 mice. We set out specifically to examine the impact of sex on light at night's effects, as well as the impact of housing conditions. We report minimal impact of light-at-night on circadian and affective behaviours, as measured by the tail suspension test, the forced swim test, the sucrose preference test and the elevated plus maze. Light-at-night was also not associated with an increase in body weight, but was associated with a decrease in the cell proliferation marker Ki-67 in the dentate gyrus. In summary, we conclude that experimental contextual factors, such as model species or strain, may be considerable importance in the investigation of the impact of light at night on mood-related parameters.  
  Address Department of Psychology, Maynooth University, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, Ireland. Electronic address: andrew.coogan@mu.ie  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN 0031-9384 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29540316 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1826  
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Author (up) Datta, S.; Samanta, D.; Sinha, P.; Chakrabarti, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Gender features and estrous cycle variations of nocturnal behavior of mice after a single exposure to light at night Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Physiology & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Physiol Behav  
  Volume 164 Issue Pt A Pages 113-122  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Light at night alters behavior and cognitive performances in rodents, the variations of which in gender and stages of reproductive cycle in females are elusive. Young mice habituated in light:dark (12:12h) cycle were given a single exposure of light (100lx) at early night for one hour duration followed by experimentations in open field (closed wall with circular big arena), elevated plus maze and square habituated field for memory performance using novel object recognition task. Light effects were compared with results found during without light conditions. Proestrous females appeared to have greater locomotor activity, less anxiety and better memory performance compared to the diestrous females at night without light exposure. The status of locomotor activity, anxiety and memory performance of male mice at night without light exposure appeared to be comparable to females where the stage of estrous cycle is important to characterize the nocturnal behavior of male mice. Light maximally affected proestrous females with decrease in locomotor activity, increase in anxiety and failure of memory performance. Male and diestrous female mice performed memory performance without alteration of locomotor activity and anxiety after exposure to light where males performed better memory performance with greater locomotor activity and more anxiety compared to that of diestrous females. The present study characterizes the mice nocturnal behavior with and without a single exposure to light stimuli with its gender features and estrous cycle variation. In addition, the study indicates an association of memory performance with locomotor activity and anxiety in mice nocturnal behavior.  
  Address Department of Physiology, University of Calcutta, Kolkata, West Bengal, India. Electronic address: ncphysiolcu@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0031-9384 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27241632 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1521  
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Author (up) de Jong, M.; Jeninga, L.; Ouyang, J.Q.; van Oers, K.; Spoelstra, K.; Visser, M.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dose-dependent responses of avian daily rhythms to artificial light at night Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Physiology & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Physiol Behav  
  Volume 155 Issue Pages 172-179  
  Keywords Animals; Artificial light at night; Circadian rhythm; Dose-response; Great tit; Light intensity; Melatonin; Parus major  
  Abstract Recent studies have shown that animals are affected by night-time light exposure. Light is a continuous variable, but our knowledge on how individuals react to different light intensities during the night is limited. We therefore determined the relationship between night light intensity and the behaviour and physiology of great tits (Parus major). We measured daily activity patterns and melatonin levels in 35 males exposed to five different light intensities and found strong, dose-dependent effects. Activity onset was increasingly advanced, and activity offset delayed with higher light intensities. Furthermore, night-time activity increased and melatonin levels measured at midnight decreased with higher intensities. In this experimental study, we demonstrate for the first time dose-dependent effects of artificial light at night on birds' daily activity patterns and melatonin levels. Our results imply that these effects are not limited to a certain threshold, but emerge even when nocturnal light levels are slightly increased. However, in a natural area, these effects may be limited as artificial light levels are commonly low; light intensities drop rapidly with distance from a light source and birds can avoid exposure to light at night. Future studies should thus focus on examining the impact of different intensities of light at night in the wild.  
  Address Department of Animal Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), P.O. Box 50, 6700 AB Wageningen, The Netherlands; m.dejong(at)nioo.knaw.nl  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0031-9384 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:26703233 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1327  
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