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Author Pan, J.; Yang, Y.; Yang, B.; Dai, W.; Yu, Y.
Title Human-Friendly Light-Emitting Diode Source Stimulates Broiler Growth Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 10 Issue 8 Pages (down) e0135330
Keywords Animals
Abstract Previous study and our laboratory have reported that short-wavelength (blue and green) light and combination stimulate broiler growth. However, short-wavelength stimuli could have negative effects on poultry husbandry workers. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of human-friendly yellow LED light, which is acceptable to humans and close to green light, on broiler growth. We also aimed to investigate the potential quantitative relationship between the wavelengths of light used for artificial illumination and growth parameters in broilers. After hatching, 360 female chicks (“Meihuang” were evenly divided into six lighting treatment groups: white LED strips (400-700 nm, WL); red LED strips (620 nm, RL); yellow LED strips (580 nm, YL); green LED strips (514 nm, GL); blue LED strips (455 nm, BL); and fluorescent strips (400-700 nm, FL). From 30 to 72 days of age, broilers reared under YL and GL were heavier than broilers treated with FL (P < 0.05). Broilers reared under YL obtained the similar growth parameters with the broilers reared under GL and BL (P > 0.05). Moreover, YL significantly improved feeding efficiency when compared with GL and BL at 45 and 60 days of age (P < 0.05). In addition, we found an age-dependent effect of light spectra on broiler growth and a quantitative relationship between LED light spectra (455 to 620 nm) and the live body weights of broilers. The wavelength of light (455 to 620 nm) was found to be negatively related (R2 = 0.876) to live body weight at an early stage of development, whereas the wavelength of light (455 to 620 nm) was found to be positively correlated with live body weight (R2 = 0.925) in older chickens. Our results demonstrated that human-friendly yellow LED light (YL), which is friendly to the human, can be applied to the broilers production.
Address College of Biosystems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058, China
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ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26270988 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1241
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Author Cohen, J.H.; Berge, J.; Moline, M.A.; Sorensen, A.J.; Last, K.; Falk-Petersen, S.; Renaud, P.E.; Leu, E.S.; Grenvald, J.; Cottier, F.; Cronin, H.; Menze, S.; Norgren, P.; Varpe, O.; Daase, M.; Darnis, G.; Johnsen, G.
Title Is Ambient Light during the High Arctic Polar Night Sufficient to Act as a Visual Cue for Zooplankton? Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 10 Issue 6 Pages (down) e0126247
Keywords Animals
Abstract The light regime is an ecologically important factor in pelagic habitats, influencing a range of biological processes. However, the availability and importance of light to these processes in high Arctic zooplankton communities during periods of 'complete' darkness (polar night) are poorly studied. Here we characterized the ambient light regime throughout the diel cycle during the high Arctic polar night, and ask whether visual systems of Arctic zooplankton can detect the low levels of irradiance available at this time. To this end, light measurements with a purpose-built irradiance sensor and coupled all-sky digital photographs were used to characterize diel skylight irradiance patterns over 24 hours at 79 degrees N in January 2014 and 2015. Subsequent skylight spectral irradiance and in-water optical property measurements were used to model the underwater light field as a function of depth, which was then weighted by the electrophysiologically determined visual spectral sensitivity of a dominant high Arctic zooplankter, Thysanoessa inermis. Irradiance in air ranged between 1-1.5 x 10-5 mumol photons m-2 s-1 (400-700 nm) in clear weather conditions at noon and with the moon below the horizon, hence values reflect only solar illumination. Radiative transfer modelling generated underwater light fields with peak transmission at blue-green wavelengths, with a 465 nm transmission maximum in shallow water shifting to 485 nm with depth. To the eye of a zooplankter, light from the surface to 75 m exhibits a maximum at 485 nm, with longer wavelengths (>600 nm) being of little visual significance. Our data are the first quantitative characterisation, including absolute intensities, spectral composition and photoperiod of biologically relevant solar ambient light in the high Arctic during the polar night, and indicate that some species of Arctic zooplankton are able to detect and utilize ambient light down to 20-30m depth during the Arctic polar night.
Address The University Centre in Svalbard, 9171, Longyearbyen, Norway; Applied Underwater Robotics Lab, Depts of Biology and Marine Technology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491, Trondheim, Norway
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26039111; PMCID:PMC4454649 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1277
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Author Szaz, D.; Horvath, G.; Barta, A.; Robertson, B.A.; Farkas, A.; Egri, A.; Tarjanyi, N.; Racz, G.; Kriska, G.
Title Lamp-Lit Bridges as Dual Light-Traps for the Night-Swarming Mayfly, Ephoron virgo: Interaction of Polarized and Unpolarized Light Pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 10 Issue 3 Pages (down) e0121194
Keywords Animals
Abstract Ecological photopollution created by artificial night lighting can alter animal behavior and lead to population declines and biodiversity loss. Polarized light pollution is a second type of photopollution that triggers water-seeking insects to ovisposit on smooth and dark man-made objects, because they simulate the polarization signatures of natural water bodies. We document a case study of the interaction of these two forms of photopollution by conducting observations and experiments near a lamp-lit bridge over the river Danube that attracts mass swarms of the mayfly Ephoron virgo away from the river to oviposit on the asphalt road of the bridge. Millions of mayflies swarmed near bridge-lights for two weeks. We found these swarms to be composed of 99% adult females performing their upstream compensatory flight and were attracted upward toward unpolarized bridge-lamp light, and away from the horizontally polarized light trail of the river. Imaging polarimetry confirmed that the asphalt surface of the bridge was strongly and horizontally polarized, providing a supernormal ovipositional cue to Ephoron virgo, while other parts of the bridge were poor polarizers of lamplight. Collectively, we confirm that Ephoron virgo is independently attracted to both unpolarized and polarized light sources, that both types of photopollution are being produced at the bridge, and that spatial patterns of swarming and oviposition are consistent with evolved behaviors being triggered maladaptively by these two types of light pollution. We suggest solutions to bridge and lighting design that should prevent or mitigate the impacts of such scenarios in the future. The detrimental impacts of such scenarios may extend beyond Ephoron virgo.
Address Danube Research Institute, Centre for Ecological Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary; Group for Methodology in Biology Teaching, Biological Institute, Eotvos University, Budapest, Hungary
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ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:25815748 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1145
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Author Navarro, Johanna Y.; Lahti, David C.
Title Light Dulls and Darkens Bird Eggs Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal
Volume 9 Issue 12 Pages (down) e116112
Keywords aanimals; birds; eggshell; color
Abstract Although egg color is generally consistent within individual birds and robust to environmental variation, recent evidence suggests a degree of susceptibility to environmental perturbation or modulation of egg color. Most of this variation manifests via the physiology of the laying female, but some direct impacts of the environment on laid eggs have also been discovered. Here we test whether light changes bird egg color and we quantify its effect, by subjecting variable blue-green eggs of Rüppell's weaver (Ploceus galbula) to a broad-spectrum light source under laboratory conditions, and measuring egg reflectance every few hours. Eggshells gradually decreased in reflectance across the entire measured wavelength spectrum of 250–800 nm. Reflectance peaks were disproportionately affected, such that the height decreased of both the blue-green peak and the smaller UV peak typical of blue-green eggs. The reflectance of lighter eggs was affected slightly more than that of darker eggs. These changes are similar to previous results for changes over long periods of time in darkness, suggesting that light might hasten the same process of pigment degradation that proceeds even without light. Comparison between the experimental light source and both sunlight and typical artificial lighting situations raises the possibility that significant color change might occur during incubation in some birds, but indicates that eggshell illumination in museums for short periods of study is unlikely to affect their color to a detectable extent. Additional research should be performed on eggs of other species and in other light environments, with an eye to an eventual generalized model of the effect of light on eggshell color.
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Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1597
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Author Rodríguez, A.; Burgan, G.; Dann, P.; Jessop, R.; Negro, J.J.; Chiaradia, A.
Title Fatal Attraction of Short-Tailed Shearwaters to Artificial Lights Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication PLOS ONE Abbreviated Journal PLOS ONE
Volume 9 Issue Pages (down) e110114
Keywords
Abstract Light pollution is increasing around the world and altering natural nightscapes with potential ecological and evolutionary consequences. A severe ecological perturbation caused by artificial lights is mass mortalities of organisms, including seabird fledglings that are attracted to lights at night on their first flights to the sea. Here, we report on the number of fledging short-tailed shearwaters Ardenna tenuirostris found grounded in evening and morning rescue patrols conducted at Phillip Island, Australia, during a 15-year period (1999–2013). We assessed factors affecting numbers of grounded birds and mortality including date, moon phase, wind direction and speed, number of visitors and holiday periods. We also tested experimentally if birds were attracted to lights by turning the lights off on a section of the road. Of 8871 fledglings found, 39% were dead or dying. This mortality rate was 4–8 times higher than reported elsewhere for other shearwater species, probably because searching for fledglings was part of our systematic rescue effort rather than the opportunistic rescue used elsewhere. Thus, it suggests that light-induced mortality of seabirds is usually underestimated. We rescued more birds (dead and alive) in peak fledging, moonless and windy nights. Mortality increased through the fledging period, in the mornings and with increased traffic on holiday periods. Turning the road lights off decreased the number of grounded birds (dead and alive). While moon, wind and time are uncontrolled natural constraints, we demonstrated that reduction of light pollution and better traffic management can mitigate artificial light-induced mortality.
Address Animals; light pollution; ecology; shearwater; short-tailed shearwaters; Ardenna tenuirostris; Phillip Island; Australia; mortality; birds
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Publisher PLOS Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
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Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 678
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