toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Massey, P.; Foltz, C. B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Spectrum of the Night Sky over Mount Hopkins and Kitt Peak: Changes after a Decade1 Type Journal Article
  Year 2000 Publication Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific Abbreviated Journal Publ Astron Soc Pac  
  Volume 112 Issue 770 Pages (up) 566-573  
  Keywords Kitt Peak; observatories; Arizona; skyglow; light pollution; measurements  
  Abstract Recent (1998–1999) absolute spectrophotometry of the night sky over two southern Arizona astronomical sites, Kitt Peak and Mount Hopkins, is compared to similar data obtained in 1988 at each site. The current zenith sky brightness in the range ∼3700–6700 Ã… is essentially identical at the two sites and is as dark now as Palomar Observatory was in the early 1970s, when it was generally considered a premier dark observing site. Converted to broadband measurements, our spectrophotometry is equivalent to , mag arcsec−2, for the zenith night sky. The contribution of high‐pressure sodium street lights to broadband V is about 0.2 mag arcsec−2, comparable to the strong airglow O i λ5577 line. During the period from 1988 to 1998–1999, the zenith sky brightness increased only modestly, with the largest changes being seen for Kitt Peak, where the zenith sky has brightened by ≈0.1–0.2 mag arcsec−2 in the blue‐optical region. For Kitt Peak we also have both 1988 and 1999 observations at modestly large zenith distances ( ). In the directions away from Tucson, the sky has brightened by ≈0.35 mag arcsec−2 over the intervening decade. Toward Tucson the change has been larger, approximately 0.5 mag arcsec−2. In most directions the increase in the sky brightness has lagged behind the fractional increase in population growth, which we attribute to good outdoor lighting ordinances, a fact which is further reflected in the decrease in Hg emission. However, our results emphasize the need for diligent attention as developments creep closer to our observing sites.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0004-6280 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 264  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Walker, M.F. openurl 
  Title The California Site Survey. Type Journal Article
  Year 1970 Publication Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 82 Issue Pages (up) 672-698  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 568  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Aceituno, J.; Sánchez, S.F.; Aceituno, F.J.; Galadí-Enríquez, D.; Negro, J.J.; Soriguer, R.C.; Gomez, G.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An All-Sky Transmission Monitor: ASTMON Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific Abbreviated Journal Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific  
  Volume 123 Issue 907 Pages (up) 1076-1086  
  Keywords monitoring; light at night; light pollution; skyglow  
  Abstract We present here the All-Sky Transmission Monitor (ASTMON), designed to perform a continuous monitoring of the surface brightness of the complete night sky in several bands. The data acquired are used to derive, in addition, a subsequent map of the multiband atmospheric extinction at any location in the sky and a map of the cloud coverage. The instrument has been manufactured to withstand extreme weather conditions and to remain operative. Designed to be fully robotic, it is ideal to be installed outdoors as a permanent monitoring station. The preliminary results based on two of the currently operative units (at Doñana National Park, Huelva, and at the Calar Alto Observatory, Almería, Spain) are presented here. The parameters derived using ASTMON are in good agreement with those previously reported, which illustrates the validity of the design and the accuracy of the manufacturing. The information provided by this instrument will be presented in forthcoming articles, once we have accumulated a statistically significant amount of data.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0004-6280 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 195  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sánchez, S. F.; Aceituno, J.; Thiele, U.; Pérez-Ramírez, D.; Alves, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Night Sky at the Calar Alto Observatory Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific Abbreviated Journal Publ Astron Soc Pac  
  Volume 119 Issue 860 Pages (up) 1186-1200  
  Keywords Skyglow, Darkness  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0004-6280 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1131  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhang, J.-C.; Ge, L.; Lu, X.-M.; Cao, Z.-H.; Chen, X.; Mao, Y.-N.; Jiang, X.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Astronomical Observing Conditions at Xinglong Observatory from 2007 to 2014 Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific Abbreviated Journal Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific  
  Volume 127 Issue 958 Pages (up) 1292-1306  
  Keywords Skyglow; light pollution; observatories; China; Xinglong; Sky Quality Meter; SQM  
  Abstract Xinglong Observatory of the National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC), is one of the major optical observatories in China, which hosts nine optical telescopes including the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) and the 2.16 m reflector. Scientific research from these telescopes is focused on stars, galaxies, and exoplanets using multicolor photometry and spectroscopic observations. Therefore, it is important to provide the observing conditions of the site, in detail, to the astronomers for an efficient use of these facilities. In this article, we present the characterization of observing conditions at Xinglong Observatory based on the monitoring of meteorology, seeing and sky brightness during the period from 2007 to 2014. Meteorological data were collected from a commercial Automatic Weather Station (AWS), calibrated by China Meteorological Administration. Mean and median wind speed are almost constant during the period analyzed and ranged from 1.0 to 3.5 m s-1. However, high wind speed (≥15 m s-1) interrupts observations, mainly, during the winter and spring. Statistical analysis of air temperature showed the temperature difference between daytime and nighttime, which can be solved by opening the ventilation device and the slit of the dome at least 1 hr before observations. Analysis resulted in average percentage of photometric nights and spectroscopic nights are 32% and 63% per year, respectively. The distribution of photometric nights and spectroscopic nights has a significant seasonal tendency, worse in summer due to clouds, dust, and high humidity. Seeing measurements were obtained using the Differential Image Motion Monitor (DIMM). Mean and median values of seeing over 1 year are around 1.9″ and 1.7″, respectively. Eighty percent of nights with seeing values are below 2.6″, whereas the distribution peaks around 1.8″. The measurements of sky brightness are acquired from the Sky Quality Meter (SQM) and photometric observations. Analysis shows that sky brightness at the zenith is around 21.1 mag arcsec-2 and becomes brighter with a larger zenith angle. Sky brightness increases due to the light pollution of the surrounding cities, Beijing, Tangshan, and Chengde. Significant influence toward the direction of Beijing, at an altitude of 30°, can increase the sky brightness up to 20.0 mag arcsec-2. Sky brightness reduces after midnight, mainly because of the influence of city lights and the artificial acts. The above results suggest that Xinglong Observatory is still a good site for astronomical observations. Our analysis of the observing conditions at Xinglong Observatory can be used as a reference to the observers on targets selection, observing strategy, and telescope operation.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Royal Astronomical Societynomical Society of the Pacific Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0004-6280 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1365  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: