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Author Walker, M.F. openurl 
  Title The California Site Survey. Type Journal Article
  Year 1970 Publication Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 82 Issue (up) Pages 672-698  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 568  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Aubé, M.; Fortin, N.; Turcotte, S.; García, B.; Mancilla, A.; Maya, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluation of the Sky Brightness at Two Argentinian Astronomical Sites Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific Abbreviated Journal Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages 000-000  
  Keywords Skyglow; light pollution; astronomical observatories; sky brightness; site selection; LEO ++; El Leoncito; Kitt Peak; Mont-Mégantic; Argentina  
  Abstract Light pollution is a growing concern at many levels, especially for the astronomical community. Indeed, not only does artificial lighting veil celestial objects, it disturbs the measurement of many atmospheric phenomena. The sky brightness is one of the most relevant parameters for astronomical site selection. Our goal is to evaluate the sky brightness of two Argentinian observation sites: LEO ++ and El Leoncito. Both sites were preselected to host the Cherenkov Telescope Array. This project consists of an arrangement of many telescopes that can measure high-energy gamma ray emissions via their Cherenkov radiation produced when entering the earth’s atmosphere. In this paper, we describe the measurement methods used to determine whether those sites are valuable or not. We compared our results with the sky radiance of different renowned astronomical sites (Kitt Peak, Arizona, and Mont-Mégantic, Québec, Canada). Among our results, we found that LEO ++ is a good site, however the presence of a low layer of local aerosol can introduce uncertainties in the measurements. Consequently, El Leoncito would be a better option for such an installation. This latter site shows very low sky brightness levels, which are optimal for low light detection.  
  Address  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0004-6280 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1071  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lockwood, G.W.; Thompson, D.T.; Floyd, R.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sky glow and outdoor lighting trends since 1976 at the Lowell Observatory Type Journal Article
  Year 1990 Publication Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific Abbreviated Journal PASP  
  Volume 102 Issue (up) Pages 481  
  Keywords Skyglow; Lighting  
  Abstract Urban sky-glow (light pollution) trends, recorded photoelectrically in intermediate-band b (472 nm) and y (551 nm) filters at the original site of the Lowell Observatory on Mars Hill near downtown Flagstaff, Arizona, reflect not just the population growth of the surrounding city but also some ameliorating effects of lighting controls and a changing mix of outdoor lighting sources. Since 1976 the sky brightness increased in b but has been virtually constant in y. New ordinances limit lighting growth near observatories and require monochromatic low-pressure sodium luminaires for most applications.  
  Address  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0004-6280 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3026  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Grauer, A.D.; Grauer, P.A.; Davies, N.; Davies, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Impact of Space Weather on the Natural Night Sky Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific Abbreviated Journal PASP  
  Volume 131 Issue (up) 1005 Pages 114508  
  Keywords Darkness; night sky brightness; United States; New Zealand; Sun; space weather; solar wind  
  Abstract In 2018, Solar Cycle 24 entered a deep solar minimum. During this period, we collected night sky brightness data at Cosmic Campground International Dark Sky Sanctuary (CCIDSS) in the USA (2018 September 4–2019 January 4) and at Aotea/Great Barrier Island International Dark Sky Sanctuary (AGBIIDSS) in New Zealand (2018 March 26–August 31. These sites have artificial-light-pollution-free natural night skies. The equipment employed are identical Unihedron SQM-LU-DL meters, used as single-channel differential photometers, to scan the sky as Earth rotates on its axis. We have developed new analysis techniques which select those data points which are uninfluenced by Sun, Moon, or clouds to follow brightness changes at selected points on the celestial sphere and to measure the brightness of the airglow above its quiescent level. The 2018 natural night sky was measured to change in brightness by approximately 0.9 mag arcsec−2 at both locations. Preliminary results indicate the modulations of the light curves (brightness versus R.A.) we observed are related in complex ways to elements of space weather conditions in the near-Earth environment. In particular, episodes of increased night sky brightness are observed to be contemporaneous with geomagnetic activity, increases in mean solar wind speed, and some solar proton/electron fluence events. Charged particles in the solar wind take days to reach near-Earth environment after a coronal hole is observed to be facing in our direction. Use of this information could make it possible to predict increases in Earth’s natural night sky brightness several days in advance. What we have learned during this solar minimum leads us to search for other solar driven changes in night sky brightness as the Sun begins to move into solar maximum conditions.  
  Address Catalina Sky Survey, Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, USA; algrauer(at)me.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Astronomical Society of the Pacific Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0004-6280 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2696  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hoag, A.A. url  openurl
  Title City Sky Glow Monitoring at Kitt Peak. Type Journal Article
  Year 1973 Publication Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 85 Issue (up) 507 Pages 503-507  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract Photographs of night sky have been taken from Kitt Peak on clear moonless nights to provide a record of changes in contamination from artificial lights. Quantitative measures confirm the obvious qualitative impression that city sky-glow brightness is increasing as is the case at most existing observatory sites.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 565  
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