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Author (up) Abbott, S.M.; Malkani, R.G.; Zee, P.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian disruption and human health: A bidirectional relationship Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The European Journal of Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Eur J Neurosci  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Human Health; Review  
  Abstract Circadian rhythm disorders have been classically associated with disorders of abnormal timing of the sleep-wake cycle, however circadian dysfunction can play a role in a wide range of pathology, ranging from the increased risk for cardiometabolic disease and malignancy in shift workers, prompting the need for a new field focused on the larger concept of circadian medicine. The relationship between circadian disruption and human health is bidirectional, with changes in circadian amplitude often preceding the classical symptoms of neurodegenerative disorders. As our understanding of the importance of circadian dysfunction in disease grows, we need to develop better clinical techniques for identifying circadian rhythms and also develop circadian based strategies for disease management. Overall this review highlights the need to bring the concept of time to all aspects of medicine, emphasizing circadian medicine as a prime example of both personalized and precision medicine.  
  Address Department of Neurology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0953-816X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30549337 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2154  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cajochen, C.; Jud, C.; Munch, M.; Kobialka, S.; Wirz-Justice, A.; Albrecht, U. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evening exposure to blue light stimulates the expression of the clock gene PER2 in humans Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication The European Journal of Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Eur J Neurosci  
  Volume 23 Issue 4 Pages 1082-1086  
  Keywords Human Health; Adult; Color; Darkness; Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation; Female; Gene Expression/*radiation effects; Humans; *Light; Male; Melatonin/metabolism; Mucous Membrane/metabolism/radiation effects; Nuclear Proteins/genetics/*metabolism; Period Circadian Proteins; Transcription Factors/genetics/*metabolism  
  Abstract We developed a non-invasive method to measure and quantify human circadian PER2 gene expression in oral mucosa samples and show that this gene oscillates in a circadian (= about a day) fashion. We also have the first evidence that induction of human PER2 expression is stimulated by exposing subjects to 2 h of light in the evening. This increase in PER2 expression was statistically significant in comparison to a non-light control condition only after light at 460 nm (blue) but not after light exposure at 550 nm (green). Our results indicate that the non-image-forming visual system is involved in human circadian gene expression. The demonstration of a functional circadian machinery in human buccal samples and its response to light opens the door for investigation of human circadian rhythms at the gene level and their associated disorders.  
  Address Centre for Chronobiology, Psychiatric University Clinics, University of Basel, CH-4025 Basel, Switzerland. christian.cajochen@unibas.ch  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0953-816X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:16519674 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 727  
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Author (up) Coleman, G.; Gigg, J.; Canal, M.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Postnatal light alters hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function and induces a depressive-like phenotype in adult mice Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication The European Journal of Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Eur J Neurosci  
  Volume 44 Issue 10 Pages 2807-2817  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The postnatal light environment that a mouse experiences during the critical first 3 postnatal weeks has long-term effects on both its circadian rhythm output and clock gene expression. Furthermore, data from our lab suggest that postnatal light may also impact the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which is a key regulator of stress. To test the effect of postnatal light exposure on adult stress responses and circadian rhythmicity, we raised mice under either 24-h light-dark cycles (LD), constant light (LL) or constant dark (DD) during the first 3 postnatal weeks. After weaning we then exposed all animals to LD cycles (basal conditions), followed by LL (stressed conditions) environments. We examined brain neuropeptide and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression, plasma corticosterone concentration rhythm and body temperature rhythm, together with depression- and anxiety-related behaviour. Results showed that LL- and DD-raised mice exhibited decreased GR expression in the hippocampus, increased plasma corticosterone concentration at the onset of the dark phase and a depressive phenotype when exposed to LD cycles later in life. Furthermore, LL-raised mice showed increased corticotrophin-releasing hormone mRNA expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. When exposed to LL as adults, LL-raised mice showed a significant circadian rhythm of plasma corticosterone concentration, together with a shorter period and stronger circadian rhythm of body temperature compared to DD-raised mice. Taken together, these data suggest that altered postnatal light environments have long-term effects on the HPA axis and the circadian system, which can lead to altered stress responses and a depressive phenotype in adulthood. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, AV Hill Building, Oxford Road, M13 9PT, Manchester, UK. maria.canal@manchester.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0953-816X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27591429 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1523  
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Author (up) Leise, T.L.; Goldberg, A.; Michael, J.; Montoya, G.; Solow, S.; Molyneux, P.; Vetrivelan, R.; Harrington, M.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Recurring circadian disruption alters circadian clock sensitivity to resetting Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The European Journal of Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Eur J Neurosci  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract A single phase advance of the light:dark (LD) cycle can temporarily disrupt synchrony of neural circadian rhythms within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and between the SCN and peripheral tissues. Compounding this, modern life can involve repeated disruptive light conditions. To model chronic disruption to the circadian system, we exposed male mice to more than a month of a 20 h light cycle (LD10:10), which mice typically cannot entrain to. Control animals were housed under LD12:12. We measured locomotor activity and body temperature rhythms in vivo, and rhythms of PER2::LUC bioluminescence in SCN and peripheral tissues ex vivo. Unexpectedly, we discovered strong effects of the time of dissection on circadian phase of PER2::LUC bioluminescent rhythms, which varied across tissues. White adipose tissue was strongly reset by dissection, while thymus phase appeared independent of dissection timing. Prior light exposure impacted the SCN, resulting in strong resetting of SCN phase by dissection for mice housed under LD10:10, and weak phase shifts by time of dissection in SCN from control LD12:12 mice. These findings suggest that exposure to circadian disruption may desynchronize SCN neurons, increasing network sensitivity to perturbations. We propose that tissues with a weakened circadian network, such as the SCN under disruptive light conditions, or with little to no coupling, e.g., some peripheral tissues, will show increased resetting effects. In particular, exposure to light at inconsistent circadian times on a recurring weekly basis disrupts circadian rhythms and alters sensitivity of the SCN neural pacemaker to dissection time. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address Neuroscience Program, Smith College, Northampton, MA, 01063, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0953-816X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30269396 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2036  
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Author (up) Taufique, S.K.T.; Prabhat, A.; Kumar, V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Illuminated night alters hippocampal gene expressions and induces depressive-like responses in diurnal corvids Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The European Journal of Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Eur J Neurosci  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Artificial light at night induces circadian disruptions and causes cognitive impairment and mood disorders; yet very little is known about the neural and molecular correlates of these effects in diurnal animals. We manipulated the night environment and examined cellular and molecular changes in hippocampus, the brain region involved in cognition and mood, of Indian house crows (Corvus splendens) exposed to 12 h light (150 lux): 12 h darkness (0 lux). Diurnal corvids are an ideal model species with cognitive abilities at par with mammals. Dim light (6 lux) at night (dLAN) altered daily activity:rest pattern, reduced sleep and induced depressive-like responses (decreased eating and self-grooming, self-mutilation and reduced novel object exploration); return to an absolute dark night reversed these negative effects. dLAN suppressed nocturnal melatonin levels, however, diurnal corticosterone levels were unaffected. Concomitant reduction of immunoreactivity for DCX and BDNF suggested dLAN-induced suppression of hippocampal neurogenesis and compromised neuronal health. dLAN also negatively influenced hippocampal expression of genes associated with depressive-like responses (bdnf, il-1beta, tnfr1, nr4a2), but not of those associated with neuronal plasticity (egr1, creb, syngap, syn2, grin2a, grin2b), cellular oxidative stress (gst, sod3, cat1) and neuronal death (caspase2, caspase3, foxo3). Furthermore, we envisaged the role of BDNF and showed epigenetic modification of bdnf gene by decreased histone H3 acetylation and increased hdac4 expression under dLAN. These results demonstrate transcriptional and epigenetic bases of dLAN-induced negative effects in diurnal crows, and provide insights into the risks of exposure to illuminated nights to animals including humans in an urban setting. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address IndoUS Center for Biological Timing Department of Zoology, University of Delhi, Delhi, 110 007, India  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0953-816X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30218624 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2010  
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