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Author (up) Nelson, R.J.; Chbeir, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dark matters: effects of light at night on metabolism Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society Abbreviated Journal Proc Nutr Soc  
  Volume 77 Issue 3 Pages 223-229  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Life on earth has evolved during the past several billion years under relatively bright days and dark night conditions. The wide-spread adoption of electric lights during the past century exposed animals, both human and non-human, to significant light at night for the first time in their evolutionary history. Endogenous circadian clocks depend on light to entrain to the external daily environment and seasonal rhythms depend on clear nightly melatonin signals to assess time of year. Thus, light at night can derange temporal adaptations. Indeed, disruption of naturally evolved light-dark cycles results in several physiological and behavioural changes with potentially serious implications for physiology, behaviour and mood. In this review, data from night-shift workers on their elevated risk for metabolic disorders, as well as data from animal studies will be discussed. Night-shift workers are predisposed to obesity and dysregulated metabolism that may result from disrupted circadian rhythms. Although studies in human subjects are correlative, animal studies have revealed several mechanisms through which light at night may exert its effects on metabolism by disrupting circadian rhythms that are associated with inflammation, both in the brain and in the periphery. Disruption of the typical timing of food intake is a key effect of light at night and subsequent metabolic dysregulation. Strategies to avoid the effects of light at night on body mass dysregulation should be pursued.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience,The Ohio State University,Columbus, OH 43210,USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0029-6651 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29747703 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1896  
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Author (up) Versteeg, R.I.; Stenvers, D.J.; Kalsbeek, A.; Bisschop, P.H.; Serlie, M.J.; la Fleur, S.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nutrition in the spotlight: metabolic effects of environmental light Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society Abbreviated Journal Proc Nutr Soc  
  Volume 75 Issue 4 Pages 451-463  
  Keywords Animals; Human Health  
  Abstract Use of artificial light resulted in relative independence from the natural light-dark (LD) cycle, allowing human subjects to shift the timing of food intake and work to convenient times. However, the increase in artificial light exposure parallels the increase in obesity prevalence. Light is the dominant Zeitgeber for the central circadian clock, which resides within the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus, and coordinates daily rhythm in feeding behaviour and metabolism. Eating during inappropriate light conditions may result in metabolic disease via changes in the biological clock. In this review, we describe the physiological role of light in the circadian timing system and explore the interaction between the circadian timing system and metabolism. Furthermore, we discuss the acute and chronic effects of artificial light exposure on food intake and energy metabolism in animals and human subjects. We propose that living in synchrony with the natural daily LD cycle promotes metabolic health and increased exposure to artificial light at inappropriate times of day has adverse effects on metabolism, feeding behaviour and body weight regulation. Reducing the negative side effects of the extensive use of artificial light in human subjects might be useful in the prevention of metabolic disease.  
  Address Department of Endocrinology & Metabolism,Academic Medical Center,University of Amsterdam,Meibergdreef 9,F2-154, 1105 AZ Amsterdam-Zuidoost,The Netherlands  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0029-6651 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27499509 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1504  
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