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Author Arnaud Da Silva, Jelmer M. Samplonius, Emmi Schlicht, Mihai Valcu, Bart Kempenaers url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial night lighting rather than traffic noise affects the daily timing of dawn and dusk singing in common European songbirds Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication (up) Behavioral Ecology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 25 Issue 5 Pages 1037-1047  
  Keywords animal, birds, dawn chorus, dusk chorus, light intensity, light pollution, noise pollution, seasonality, songbird, weather  
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  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1105  
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Author Landgraf, D.; McCarthy, M.J.; Welsh, D.K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The role of the circadian clock in animal models of mood disorders Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication (up) Behavioral Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Behav Neurosci  
  Volume 128 Issue 3 Pages 344-359  
  Keywords *Circadian Rhythm; mood; mood disorders; circadian disruption  
  Abstract An association between circadian clock function and mood regulation is well established and has been proposed as a factor in the development of mood disorders. Patients with depression or mania suffer disturbed sleep-wake cycles and altered rhythms in daily activities. Environmentally disrupted circadian rhythms increase the risk of mood disorders in the general population. However, proof that a disturbance of circadian rhythms is causally involved in the development of psychiatric disorders remains elusive. Using clock gene mutants, manipulations of sleep-wake and light-dark cycles, and brain lesions affecting clock function, animal models have been developed to investigate whether circadian rhythm disruptions alter mood. In this review, selected animal models are examined to address the issue of causality between circadian rhythms and affective behavior.  
  Address Research Service, Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System  
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  ISSN 0735-7044 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:24660657 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 316  
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Author York, J E; Young, A J; Radford, A N url  doi
openurl 
  Title Singing in the moonlight: dawn song performance of a diurnal bird varies with lunar phase Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication (up) Biology letters Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 20130970  
  Keywords animals; birds; signalling behaviour; photoperiod  
  Abstract It is well established that the lunar cycle can affect the behaviour of nocturnal animals, but its potential to have a similar influence on diurnal species has received less research attention. Here, we demonstrate that the dawn song of a cooperative songbird, the white-browed sparrow weaver (Plocepasser mahali), varies with moon phase. When the moon was above the horizon at dawn, males began singing on average 10 min earlier, if there was a full moon compared with a new moon, resulting in a 67% mean increase in performance period and greater total song output. The lack of a difference between full and new moon dawns when the moon was below the horizon suggests that the observed effects were driven by light intensity, rather than driven by other factors associated with moon phase. Effects of the lunar cycle on twilight signalling behaviour have implications for both pure and applied animal communication research.  
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  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1609  
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Author Stevens, R.G.; Brainard, G.C.; Blask, D.E.; Lockley, S.W.; Motta, M.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Breast cancer and circadian disruption from electric lighting in the modern world Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication (up) CA: a Cancer Journal for Clinicians Abbreviated Journal CA Cancer J Clin  
  Volume 64 Issue 3 Pages 207-218  
  Keywords breast neoplasms; circadian clock; melatonin production; shift work; sleep duration; oncogenesis  
  Abstract Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among women worldwide, and there is only a limited explanation of why. Risk is highest in the most industrialized countries but also is rising rapidly in the developing world. Known risk factors account for only a portion of the incidence in the high-risk populations, and there has been considerable speculation and many false leads on other possibly major determinants of risk, such as dietary fat. A hallmark of industrialization is the increasing use of electricity to light the night, both within the home and without. It has only recently become clear that this evolutionarily new and, thereby, unnatural exposure can disrupt human circadian rhythmicity, of which three salient features are melatonin production, sleep, and the circadian clock. A convergence of research in cells, rodents, and humans suggests that the health consequences of circadian disruption may be substantial. An innovative experimental model has shown that light at night markedly increases the growth of human breast cancer xenografts in rats. In humans, the theory that light exposure at night increases breast cancer risk leads to specific predictions that are being tested epidemiologically: evidence has accumulated on risk in shift workers, risk in blind women, and the impact of sleep duration on risk. If electric light at night does explain a portion of the breast cancer burden, then there are practical interventions that can be implemented, including more selective use of light and the adoption of recent advances in lighting technology and application. CA Cancer J Clin 2014;64:207-218. ((c)) 2013 American Cancer Society.  
  Address Professor, Department of Community Medicine, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT  
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  ISSN 0007-9235 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:24604162; PMCID:PMC4038658 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 155  
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Author Papantoniou, K.; Pozo, O.J.; Espinosa, A.; Marcos, J.; Castano-Vinyals, G.; Basagana, X.; Ribas, F.C.; Mirabent, J.; Martin, J.; Carenys, G.; Martin, C.R.; Middleton, B.; Skene, D.J.; Kogevinas, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian variation of melatonin, light exposure, and diurnal preference in day and night shift workers of both sexes Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication (up) Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology Abbreviated Journal Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev  
  Volume 23 Issue 7 Pages 1176-1186  
  Keywords Human Health, physiology  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Light-at-night has been shown in experimental studies to disrupt melatonin production but this has only partly been confirmed in studies of night shift workers. In this cross-sectional study, we examined the circadian variation of melatonin in relation to shift status, individual levels of light-at-night exposure, and diurnal preference, an attribute reflecting personal preference for activity in the morning or evening. METHODS: One hundred and seventeen workers (75 night and 42 day) of both sexes, ages 22 to 64 years, were recruited from four companies. Participants collected urine samples from all voids over 24 hours and wore a data logger continuously recording their light exposure. Sociodemographic, occupational, lifestyle, and diurnal preference information were collected by interview. Concentrations of urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s), the main melatonin metabolite, were measured. RESULTS: Mean aMT6s levels were lower in night [10.9 ng/mg creatinine/hour; 95% confidence interval (CI), 9.5-12.6] compared with day workers (15.4; 95% CI, 12.3-19.3). The lowest aMT6s levels were observed in night workers with morning preference (6.4; 95% CI, 3.0-13.6). Peak time of aMT6s production occurred 3 hours later in night (08:42 hour, 95% CI, 07:48-09:42) compared with day workers (05:36 hour, 95% CI, 05:06-06:12). Phase delay was stronger among subjects with higher light-at-night exposure and number of nights worked. CONCLUSIONS: Night shift workers had lower levels and a delay in peak time of aMT6s production over a 24-hour period. Differences were modified by diurnal preference and intensity of light-at-night exposure. IMPACT: Night shift work affects levels and timing of melatonin production and both parameters may relate to future cancer risk.  
  Address Authors' Affiliations: Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL); IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (UPF); CIBER Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain; National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece  
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  ISSN 1055-9965 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:24812038 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1111  
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