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Author Edensor, T.; Falconer, E. doi  openurl
  Title Dans Le Noir? Eating in the dark: sensation and conviviality in a lightless place Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication (up) Cultural Geographies Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 22 Issue 4 Pages 601-618  
  Keywords Society; Darkness  
  Abstract Drawing on ethnographic interviews with customers, this paper looks at the experience of dining at Dans le Noir?, a restaurant in London where eating is carried out in complete darkness. As an exemplary gastro-tourist site within the expanding leisure economy at which sensory alterity is sought, we argue that the transformation of the usual unreflexive habits of sensing while dining offer opportunities to encounter difference and reflect upon our culturally located ways of sensing the world. In focusing upon the altered experience of apprehending space, eating and socialising in the absence of light, we contend that this dining experience offers broader suggestions about how we might reconsider the qualities and potentialities of darkness, a condition which has been historically feared and reviled in the west.  
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  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 740  
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Author Vyazovskiy, V.V.; Foster, R.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sleep: a biological stimulus from our nearest celestial neighbor? Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication (up) Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol  
  Volume 24 Issue 12 Pages R557-60  
  Keywords Human Health; Sleep; Review  
  Abstract Three studies have retrospectively analysed different data-sets to assess whether there is an effect of lunar phase upon human sleep. The results and conclusions differ. Until specifically designed experiments, controlling for key variables, are undertaken this issue will remain open.  
  Address Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Nuffield Laboratory of Ophthalmology, University of Oxford, Levels 5-6 West Wing, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headley Way, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK. Electronic address: russell.foster@eye.ox.ac.uk  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24937279 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1478  
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Author Rakshit, K.; Thomas, A.P.; Matveyenko, A.V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Does disruption of circadian rhythms contribute to beta-cell failure in type 2 diabetes? Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication (up) Current Diabetes Reports Abbreviated Journal Curr Diab Rep  
  Volume 14 Issue 4 Pages 474  
  Keywords *epidemiology; diabetes; Type 2 diabetes; beta cell; T2DM; artificial light; light exposure; circadian disruption  
  Abstract Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a complex metabolic disease characterized by the loss of beta-cell secretory function and mass. The pathophysiology of beta-cell failure in T2DM involves a complex interaction between genetic susceptibilities and environmental risk factors. One environmental condition that is gaining greater appreciation as a risk factor for T2DM is the disruption of circadian rhythms (eg, shift-work and sleep loss). In recent years, circadian disruption has become increasingly prevalent in modern societies and consistently shown to augment T2DM susceptibility (partly mediated through its effects on pancreatic beta-cells). Since beta-cell failure is essential for development of T2DM, we will review current work from epidemiologic, clinical, and animal studies designed to gain insights into the molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying the predisposition to beta-cell failure associated with circadian disruption. Elucidating the role of circadian clocks in regulating beta-cell health will add to our understanding of T2DM pathophysiology and may contribute to the development of novel therapeutic and preventative approaches.  
  Address Larry L. Hillblom Islet Research Center, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, University of California Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, 900A Weyburn Place, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1534-4827 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:24532160; PMCID:PMC3988110 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 320  
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Author Zamorano Calvo, J.; Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Nievas Rosillo, M.; Tapia Ayuga, C. url  openurl
  Title NixNox procedure to build Night Sky Brightness maps from SQM photometers observations Type Report
  Year 2014 Publication (up) E-prints Complutense Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue 26982 Pages  
  Keywords Skyglow; measurement; SQM; SQM-L; mapping  
  Abstract The NixNox procedure to build all-sky maps of the nocturnal night sky brightness using SQM photometers is described. Astronomers belonging to amateur associations in Spain are using this observational method to obtain data of their preferred sites of observation to characterize the astronomical quality of the sky and the sources of light pollution.  
  Address Departamento de Astrofísica y Ciencias de la Atmósfera, Universidad Complutense – 28040 Madrid, Spain  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Universidad Complutense Place of Publication Madrid Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1435  
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Author Pawson, S.M.; Bader, M.K.-F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title LED lighting increases the ecological impact of light pollution irrespective of color temperature Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication (up) Ecological Applications Abbreviated Journal Ecological Applications  
  Volume 24 Issue 7 Pages 1561-1568  
  Keywords biodiversity; high-pressure sodium lamp; light pollution; spectra; street lighting; urbanization; LED; color temperature; ecology  
  Abstract Recognition of the extent and magnitude of night-time light pollution impacts on natural ecosystems is increasing, with pervasive effects observed in both nocturnal and diurnal species. Municipal and industrial lighting is on the cusp of a step change where energy-efficient lighting technology is driving a shift from “yellow” high-pressure sodium vapor lamps (HPS) to new “white” light-emitting diodes (LEDs). We hypothesized that white LEDs would be more attractive and thus have greater ecological impacts than HPS due to the peak UV-green-blue visual sensitivity of nocturnal invertebrates. Our results support this hypothesis; on average LED light traps captured 48% more insects than were captured with light traps fitted with HPS lamps, and this effect was dependent on air temperature (significant light × air temperature interaction). We found no evidence that manipulating the color temperature of white LEDs would minimize the ecological impacts of the adoption of white LED lights. As such, large-scale adoption of energy-efficient white LED lighting for municipal and industrial use may exacerbate ecological impacts and potentially amplify phytosanitary pest infestations. Our findings highlight the urgent need for collaborative research between ecologists and electrical engineers to ensure that future developments in LED technology minimize their potential ecological effects.  
  Address Scion, P.O. Box 29-237, Fendalton, Christchurch, New Zealand  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1051-0761 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 367  
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