toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Higuchi, S.; Nagafuchi, Y.; Lee, S.-I.; Harada, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Influence of Light at Night on Melatonin Suppression in Children Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism Abbreviated Journal J Clin Endocrinol Metab  
  Volume (down) 99 Issue 9 Pages 3298-3303  
  Keywords melatonin; light at night; photobiology; children  
  Abstract Context: The sensitivity of melatonin to light suppression is expected to be higher in children since children have large pupils and pure crystal lenses. However, melatonin suppression by light in children remains unclear. Objective: We investigated whether light-induced melatonin suppression in children is larger than that in adults. Methods: Thirty-three healthy primary school children (mean age: 7.4 +/- 1.8 yr) and 29 healthy adults (mean age: 41.2 +/- 4.8 yr) participated in two experiments. In the first experiment, salivary melatonin concentrations in 13 children and 13 adults were measured at night under a dim light (< 30 lx) and moderately bright light (580 lx) in an experimental facility. Pupil diameters were also measured under dim light and bright light. In the second experiment, melatonin concentrations in 20 children and 16 adults were measured under dim light in the experimental facility and under room light at home (illuminance 140.0 +/- 82.7 lx). Results: In the experiment 1, the melatonin concentration was significantly decreased by exposure to moderately bright light in both adults and children. Melatonin suppression was significantly larger in children (88.2%, n=5) than in adults (46.3%, n=6) (p<0.01), although the data for some participants were excluded because melatonin concentrations had not yet risen. In the experiment 2, melatonin secretion was significantly suppressed by room light at home in children (n=15) (p<0.05) but not in adults (n=11). Conclusion: We found that the percentage of melatonin suppression by light in children was almost twice that in adults, suggesting that melatonin in children is more sensitive than that in adults to light at night.  
  Address Department of Human Science, Faculty of Design, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0021-972X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24840814 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 300  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Schmoll, C.; Khan, A.; Aspinall, P.; Goudie, C.; Koay, P.; Tendo, C.; Cameron, J.; Roe, J.; Deary, I.; Dhillon, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title New light for old eyes: comparing melanopsin-mediated non-visual benefits of blue-light and UV-blocking intraocular lenses Type
  Year 2014 Publication The British Journal of Ophthalmology Abbreviated Journal Br J Ophthalmol  
  Volume (down) 98 Issue 1 Pages 124-128  
  Keywords Aged; Cataract/*physiopathology; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Cognition/*physiology; Female; Humans; Lens Implantation, Intraocular; *Lenses, Intraocular; Light; Male; Phacoemulsification; Prospective Studies; Questionnaires; Reaction Time/physiology; Regression Analysis; Rod Opsins/*physiology; Sleep/*physiology; Physiology; Retina; blue blocker; blue light  
  Abstract BACKGROUND/AIMS: Melanopsin-expressing photosensitive retinal ganglion cells form a blue-light-sensitive non-visual system mediating diverse physiological effects including circadian entrainment and cognitive alertness. Reduced blue wavelength retinal illumination through cataract formation is thought to blunt these responses while cataract surgery and intraocular lens (IOL) implantation have been shown to have beneficial effects on sleep and cognition. We aimed to use the reaction time (RT) task and the Epworth Sleepiness Score (ESS) as a validated objective platform to compare non-visual benefits of UV- and blue-blocking IOLs. METHODS: Patients were prospectively randomised to receive either a UV- or blue-blocking IOL, performing an RT test and ESS questionnaire before and after surgery. Optical blurring at the second test controlled for visual improvement. Non-operative age-matched controls were recruited for comparison. RESULTS: 80 participants completed the study. Those undergoing first-eye phacoemulsification demonstrated significant improvements in RT over control (p=0.001) and second-eye surgery patients (p=0.03). Moreover, reduced daytime sleepiness was measured by ESS for the first-eye surgery group (p=0.008) but not for the second-eye group (p=0.09). Choice of UV- or blue-blocking IOL made no significant difference to magnitude of cognitive improvement (p=0.272). CONCLUSIONS: Phacoemulsification, particularly first-eye surgery, has a strong positive effect on cognition and daytime alertness, regardless of IOL type.  
  Address Princess Alexandra Eye Hospital, , Edinburgh, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0007-1161 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24158845 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 342  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Elvidge, C. D.; Hsu, F.-C.; Baugh, K. E.; Ghosh, T. openurl 
  Title National Trends in Satellite-Observed Lighting. Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Global Urban Monitoring and Assessment Through Earth Observation Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume (down) 97 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 932  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author He, C.; Anand, S.T.; Ebell, M.H.; Vena, J.E.; Robb, S.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian disrupting exposures and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health Abbreviated Journal Int Arch Occup Environ Health  
  Volume (down) 88 Issue 5 Pages 533-547  
  Keywords Human Health; Circadian disruption; Breast cancer; Meta-analysis; Oncogenesis; BrCA; shift work; meta-analysis  
  Abstract PURPOSE: Shift work, short sleep duration, employment as a flight attendant, and exposure to light at night, all potential causes of circadian disruption, have been inconsistently associated with breast cancer (BrCA) risk. The aim of this meta-analysis is to quantitatively evaluate the combined and independent effects of exposure to different sources of circadian disruption on BrCA risk in women. METHODS: Relevant studies published through January 2014 were identified by searching the PubMed database. The pooled relative risks (RRs) and corresponding 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using fixed- or random effects models as indicated by heterogeneity tests. Generalized least squares trend test was used to assess dose-response relationships. RESULTS: A total of 28 studies, 15 on shift work, 7 on short sleep duration, 3 on flight attendants, and 6 on light at night were included in the analysis. The combined analysis suggested a significantly positive association between circadian disruption and BrCA risk (RR = 1.14; 95 % CI 1.08-1.21). Separate analyses showed that the RR for BrCA was 1.19 (95 % CI 1.08-1.32) for shift work, 1.120 (95 % CI 1.119-1.121) for exposure to light at night, 1.56 (95 % CI 1.10-2.21) for employment as a flight attendant, and 0.96 (95 % CI 0.86-1.06) for short sleep duration. A dose-response analysis showed that each 10-year increment of shift work was associated with 16 % higher risk of BrCA (95 % CI 1.06-1.27) based on selected case-control studies. No significant dose-response effects of exposure to light at night and sleep deficiency were found on BrCA risk. CONCLUSIONS: Our meta-analysis demonstrates that circadian disruption is associated with an increased BrCA risk in women. This association varied by specific sources of circadian disrupting exposures, and a dose-response relationship remains uncertain. Therefore, future rigorous prospective studies are needed to confirm these relationships.  
  Address Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of Georgia, 101 Buck Road, Health Sciences Campus, B.S. Miller Hall, Athens, GA, 30602, USA, willahe@uga.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0340-0131 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:25261318 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1064  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gonzalez, S.A.; Yanez-Navea, K.; Munoz, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of coastal urbanization on sandy beach coleoptera Phaleria maculata (Kulzer, 1959) in northern Chile Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Marine Pollution Bulletin Abbreviated Journal Mar Pollut Bull  
  Volume (down) 83 Issue 1 Pages 265-274  
  Keywords Anthropogenic impact; Coastal urbanization index; Light pollution; Marine tenebrionid; Phaleria maculata; beetles; insects; urbanization; Chile; morphodynamics; Urbanization Index; indicator organisms  
  Abstract The beetle Phaleria maculata is a common inhabitant of the upper intertidal fringe of Chilean beaches. Anthropogenic intervention in coastal areas has increased intensely, leading to changes in the flora and fauna of sandy beaches. To examine the impact of human activities on P. maculata, we studied several beaches along the northern Chilean coast. Beaches were characterized based on morphodynamics and the level of intervention, leading to the estimation of an “Urbanization Index” based on various indicators. The analysis showed a significant inverse correlation between the rate of urbanization and night sky quality. Larval and adult beetles were almost absent on beaches with high levels of urbanization. The results of simple and multiple correlations based on nMDS ordination showed an inverse relationship between increases in urbanization and the abundance of beetles. Because darkling beetles are very sensitive to human interventions on sandy beaches, we suggest that they are ideal indicator organisms for the health of these environments.  
  Address Departamento de Biologia Marina, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Casilla 117, Coquimbo, Chile  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0025-326X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24768173 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 308  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: