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Author Dominoni, D.M.; Carmona-Wagner, E.O.; Hofmann, M.; Kranstauber, B.; Partecke, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Individual-based measurements of light intensity provide new insights into the effects of artificial light at night on daily rhythms of urban-dwelling songbirds Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Animal Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Anim Ecol  
  Volume (down) 83 Issue 3 Pages 681–692  
  Keywords Animals; Biological rhythms; light at night; light loggers; light pollution; night shift; noise; radiotelemetry; sleep disruption; temporal niche; urban sprawl  
  Abstract Summary

The growing interest in the effects of light pollution on daily and seasonal cycles of animals has led to a boost of research in recent years. In birds, it has been hypothesized that artificial light at night can affect daily aspects of behaviour, but one caveat is the lack of knowledge about the light intensity that wild animals, such as birds, are exposed to during the night.

Organisms have naturally evolved daily rhythms to adapt to the 24-h cycle of day and night, thus, it is important to investigate the potential shifts in daily cycles due to global anthropogenic processes such as urbanization.

We captured adult male European blackbirds (Turdus merula) in one rural forest and two urban sites differing in the degree of anthropogenic disturbance. We tagged these birds with light loggers and simultaneously recorded changes in activity status (active/non-active) through an automated telemetry system. We first analysed the relationship between light at night, weather conditions and date with daily activity onset and end. We then compared activity, light at night exposure and noise levels between weekdays and weekends.

Onset of daily activity was significantly advanced in both urban sites compared to the rural population, while end of daily activity did not vary either among sites. Birds exposed to higher amounts of light in the late night showed earlier onset of activity in the morning, but light at night did not influence end of daily activity. Light exposure at night and onset/end of daily activity timing was not different between weekdays and weekends, but all noise variables were. A strong seasonal effect was detected in both urban and rural populations, such as birds tended to be active earlier in the morning and later in the evening (relative to civil twilight) in the early breeding season than at later stages.

Our results point at artificial light at night as a major driver of change in timing of daily activity. Future research should focus on the costs and benefits of altered daily rhythmicity in birds thriving in urban areas.
 
  Address Department of Migration and Immuno-ecology, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Am Obstberg 1, 78315, Radolfzell, Germany; Department of Biology, University of Konstanz, Universitatsstrasse 10, 78464, Konstanz, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  ISSN 0021-8790 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24102250 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 375  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dauchy, R.T.; Xiang, S.; Mao, L.; Brimer, S.; Wren, M.A.; Yuan, L.; Anbalagan, M.; Hauch, A.; Frasch, T.; Rowan, B.G.; Blask, D.E.; Hill, S.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian and melatonin disruption by exposure to light at night drives intrinsic resistance to tamoxifen therapy in breast cancer Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Cancer Research Abbreviated Journal Cancer Res  
  Volume (down) 74 Issue 15 Pages 4099-4110  
  Keywords *Cancer; breast cancer; melatonin; endocrinology; tamoxifen; *Circadian Rhythm; circadian disruption; human health; epidemiology  
  Abstract Resistance to endocrine therapy is a major impediment to successful treatment of breast cancer. Preclinical and clinical evidence links resistance to antiestrogen drugs in breast cancer cells with the overexpression and/or activation of various pro-oncogenic tyrosine kinases. Disruption of circadian rhythms by night shift work or disturbed sleep-wake cycles may lead to an increased risk of breast cancer and other diseases. Moreover, light exposure at night (LEN) suppresses the nocturnal production of melatonin that inhibits breast cancer growth. In this study, we used a rat model of estrogen receptor (ERalpha(+)) MCF-7 tumor xenografts to demonstrate how altering light/dark cycles with dim LEN (dLEN) speed the development of breast tumors, increasing their metabolism and growth and conferring an intrinsic resistance to tamoxifen therapy. These characteristics were not observed in animals in which the circadian melatonin rhythm was not disrupted, or in animals subjected to dLEN if they received nocturnal melatonin replacement. Strikingly, our results also showed that melatonin acted both as a tumor metabolic inhibitor and a circadian-regulated kinase inhibitor to reestablish the sensitivity of breast tumors to tamoxifen and tumor regression. Together, our findings show how dLEN-mediated disturbances in nocturnal melatonin production can render tumors insensitive to tamoxifen. Cancer Res; 74(15); 4099-110. (c)2014 AACR.  
  Address Departments of Structural and Cellular Biology and Tulane Cancer Center and Louisiana Cancer Research Consortium; Tulane Circadian Cancer Biology Group; and  
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  ISSN 0008-5472 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:25062775; PMCID:PMC4119539 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 355  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Stevens, R.G.; Brainard, G.C.; Blask, D.E.; Lockley, S.W.; Motta, M.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Breast cancer and circadian disruption from electric lighting in the modern world Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication CA: a Cancer Journal for Clinicians Abbreviated Journal CA Cancer J Clin  
  Volume (down) 64 Issue 3 Pages 207-218  
  Keywords breast neoplasms; circadian clock; melatonin production; shift work; sleep duration; oncogenesis  
  Abstract Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among women worldwide, and there is only a limited explanation of why. Risk is highest in the most industrialized countries but also is rising rapidly in the developing world. Known risk factors account for only a portion of the incidence in the high-risk populations, and there has been considerable speculation and many false leads on other possibly major determinants of risk, such as dietary fat. A hallmark of industrialization is the increasing use of electricity to light the night, both within the home and without. It has only recently become clear that this evolutionarily new and, thereby, unnatural exposure can disrupt human circadian rhythmicity, of which three salient features are melatonin production, sleep, and the circadian clock. A convergence of research in cells, rodents, and humans suggests that the health consequences of circadian disruption may be substantial. An innovative experimental model has shown that light at night markedly increases the growth of human breast cancer xenografts in rats. In humans, the theory that light exposure at night increases breast cancer risk leads to specific predictions that are being tested epidemiologically: evidence has accumulated on risk in shift workers, risk in blind women, and the impact of sleep duration on risk. If electric light at night does explain a portion of the breast cancer burden, then there are practical interventions that can be implemented, including more selective use of light and the adoption of recent advances in lighting technology and application. CA Cancer J Clin 2014;64:207-218. ((c)) 2013 American Cancer Society.  
  Address Professor, Department of Community Medicine, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT  
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  ISSN 0007-9235 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:24604162; PMCID:PMC4038658 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 155  
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Author Molcan, L; Vesela, A; Zeman, M url  openurl
  Title Repeated phase shifts in the lighting regimen change the blood pressure response to norepinephrine stimulation in rats Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Physiological Research Abbreviated Journal Physiol. Res.  
  Volume (down) 63 Issue 5 Pages 567-575  
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  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1596  
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Author Perkin, E.K.; Hölker, F.; Tockner, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effects of artificial lighting on adult aquatic and terrestrial insects Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Freshwater Biology Abbreviated Journal Freshw Biol  
  Volume (down) 59 Issue 2 Pages 368-377  
  Keywords biodiversity; connectivity; dispersal; high-pressure sodium lamp; light pollution; river  
  Abstract There is a growing concern that artificial light might affect local insect populations and disrupt their dispersal across the landscape. In this study, we investigated experimentally the effect of artificial light on flying insects in the field, with an emphasis on aquatic insects. We asked whether lights prevented the ability of insects to disperse across the landscape, a process that is crucial in colonising restored habitats.

We set up six, c. 3.5 m high downward facing high-pressure sodium streetlights along a permanently connected oxbow in the Spree River of eastern Germany. We collected insects using 12 flight intercept traps, each with trays at three different heights (0.5, 1.5 and 2.5 m), placed at distances 0, 3, 40 and 75 m from the lights and 5, 8 and 80 m from water. The number of emerging aquatic insects in the study area was measured with six emergence traps. We emptied the traps 22 times between June and September 2010; the lights were on for 11 of these nights and off for the other 11.

In total, we caught almost 27 times as many insects at traps 0 m from the lights when the lights were on than when they were off. Most insects caught when the lights were on were aquatic, with Diptera being the most common order. Furthermore, the proportion of aquatic insects caught at traps 0, 3 and 40 m from the lights when they were on was significantly higher than when they were off. On lit nights, more aquatic insects were captured per hour and m2 (area in which flying insects were intercepted) at traps 0 m from the lights than emerged from per square metre per hour from the Spree River.

Our results suggest that adult aquatic insects can be negatively affected by artificial light and that city planners should take this into account when designing lighting systems along rivers.
 
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  ISSN 0046-5070 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 107  
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