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Author Costin, K.J.; Boulton, A.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Field Experiment on the Effect of Introduced Light Pollution on Fireflies (Coleoptera: Lampyridae) in the Piedmont Region of Maryland Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication The Coleopterists Bulletin Abbreviated Journal The Coleopterists Bulletin  
  Volume 70 Issue 1 Pages 84-86  
  Keywords Animals; insects; fireflies; Coleoptera; Lampyridae; Coleoptera Lampyridae; artificial light at night; ecology; light pollution  
  Abstract (up) (none)  
  Address Environmental Biology Hood College 401 Rosemont Avenue Frederick, MD 21701, U.S.A.; kjc(at)hood.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher BioOne Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0010-065X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1406  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Daoud-Opit, S.; Jones, D.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Guided by the light: Roost choice and behaviour of urban Rainbow Lorikeets (Trichoglossus haematodus) Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication European Journal of Ecology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 2 Issue 1 Pages 72-80  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract (up) 1. The formation of large communal roosts is a conspicuous phenomenon associated with a wide range of bird species successfully exploiting urban environments. In many Australian cities, the abundance of the Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus), a native parrot, has increased markedly in recent decades, with the species roosting in very large numbers within suburban sites. These roosting locations are noisy and cause significant fouling of the land beneath, resulting in conflict with humans.

2. We investigated the selection of roosting sites in this species in Brisbane, Australia, by comparing characteristics of both the general sites of these roosts as well as individual trees used within roosting sites and trees that were avoided.

3. Lorikeets used a wide variety of tree types for roosting but demonstrated a clear preference for clumped trees within sparsely treed areas that received significantly more artificial light at night than otherwise suitable sites and trees nearby.

4. These features of roosting sites may enhance the detection of nocturnal predators by Rainbow Lorikeets, suggesting a potential positive impact of anthropogenic lighting. Our findings provide valuable insights into the management of roost-related conflicts in urban areas. We encourage further investigations into the possible benefits of artificial light.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1339-8474 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1641  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Degen, T.; Mitesser, O.; Perkin, E.K.; Weiss, N.-S.; Oehlert, M.; Mattig, E.; Hölker, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Street lighting: sex-independent impacts on moth movement Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication The Journal of Animal Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Anim Ecol  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Biology  
  Abstract (up) 1.Artificial lights have become an integral and welcome part of our urban and peri-urban environments. However, recent research has highlighted the potentially negative ecological consequences of ubiquitous artificial light. In particular, insects, especially moths, are expected to be negatively impacted by the presence of artificial lights. Previous research with light traps has shown a male-biased attraction to light in moths. 2.In this study, we sought to determine if street lights could limit moth dispersal and if there was any sex bias in attraction to light. More specifically, we aimed to determine sex specific attraction radii for moths to street lights. 3.We tested these hypotheses by collecting moths for two years at an experimental setup. To estimate the attraction radii we developed a Markov model and related it to the acquired data. 4.Utilizing multinomial statistics, we found that attraction rates to lights in the middle of the matrix were substantially lower than predicted by the null hypothesis of equal attraction level (0.44 times). With the Markov model, we estimated that a corner-light was 2.77 times more attractive than a wing-light with an equivalent attraction radius of c. 23m around each light. We found neither sexual differences in the attraction rate nor in the attraction radius of males and females. Since we captured three times more males than females, we conclude that sex ratios are representative of operational sex ratios or of different flight activities. 5.These results provide evidence for street lights to limit moth dispersal, and that they seem to act equally on male and female moths. Consequently, public lighting might divide a suitable landscape into many small habitats. Therefore, it is reasonable to assume i) that public lighting near hedges and bushes or field margins reduces the quality of these important habitat structures, and ii) that public lighting near important habitat structures but not interfering with local movement may affect moth movement between patches. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Berlin, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0021-8790 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27146262 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1439  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bennie, J.; Davies, T.W.; Cruse, D.; Gaston, K.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Ecological effects of artificial light at night on wild plants Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Ecol  
  Volume 104 Issue 3 Pages 611-620  
  Keywords Plants; wild plants; photobiology; Circadian; Ecophysiology; light cycles; light pollution; photoperiodism; photopollution; physiology; sky glow; urban ecology  
  Abstract (up) 1.Plants use light as a source of both energy and information. Plant physiological responses to light, and interactions between plants and animals (such as herbivory and pollination), have evolved under a more or less stable regime of 24-hour cycles of light and darkness, and, outside of the tropics, seasonal variation in daylength.

2.The rapid spread of outdoor electric lighting across the globe over the past century has caused an unprecedented disruption to these natural light cycles. Artificial light is widespread in the environment, varying in intensity by several orders of magnitude from faint skyglow reflected from distant cities to direct illumination of urban and suburban vegetation.

3.In many cases artificial light in the nighttime environment is sufficiently bright to induce a physiological response in plants, affecting their phenology, growth form and resource allocation. The physiology, behaviour and ecology of herbivores and pollinators is also likely to be impacted by artificial light. Thus, understanding the ecological consequences of artificial light at night is critical to determine the full impact of human activity on ecosystems.

4.Synthesis. Understanding the impacts of artificial nighttime light on wild plants and natural vegetation requires linking the knowledge gained from over a century of experimental research on the impacts of light on plants in the laboratory and greenhouse with knowledge of the intensity, spatial distribution, spectral composition and timing of light in the nighttime environment. To understand fully the extent of these impacts requires conceptual models that can (i) characterise the highly heterogeneous nature of the nighttime light environment at a scale relevant to plant physiology, and (ii) scale physiological responses to predict impacts at the level of the whole plant, population, community and ecosystem.
 
  Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, United Kimgdom; j.j.bennie(at)exeter.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-0477 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1350  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sloane, M.; Slater, D.; Entwistle, J. openurl 
  Title Tackling Social Inequalities in Public Lighting Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Society  
  Abstract (up) 2This report is based on research findings of the Configuring Light/Staging the Social research programme (CL) based at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), as well as on discussions of the Configuring Light expert working group. Consisting of high-profile experts and stakeholders in the fields of design, planning and policy-making, this group was established by CL to develop a new agenda for tackling social inequalities in public lighting. Members of the working group are listed at the end of this document.This project was run by the LSE-based Configuring Light/Staging the Social research programme and funded by LSE Knowledge Exchange and Impact funding.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author London School of Economics Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2528  
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