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Author Kotarba, A.Z.; Aleksandrowicz, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Impervious surface detection with nighttime photography from the International Space Station Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment  
  Volume 176 Issue Pages 295-307  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract (up) For over two decades nighttime satellite imagery from the Operational Linescan System (OLS) has been used to detect impervious surfaces. However, OLS-based maps suffer from the sensor's coarse resolution (2.7 km/pixel), overglow, and saturation in urban areas, resulting in inaccurate estimates of the extent and degree of impervious surfaces. In order to provide more reliable estimates of impervious surface extent, we used high resolution (~ 10 m/pixel) nighttime photography from the International Space Station (ISS). Focusing on the city of Berlin in Germany, we produced a map of the extent of impervious surfaces. Our classification was 85% accurate for both user and producer measures. Impervious surfaces omitted by ISS photography were mainly transit roads and airport runways, while green areas and water bodies within the city were falsely identified. An analysis based on ISS imagery classified 55.7% of the study area as impervious, which is only 3.9% less than ground truth (while the OLS-based estimate was 40% higher than ground truth). ISS imagery failed to provide reliable information about the degree of imperviousness for individual pixels (± 20% errors); nevertheless it accurately estimated the spatially-averaged degree of imperviousness for the whole study area (30.2% vs. the reference value of 30.1%). These results show that ISS photography is an important source of nighttime imagery for mapping the extent of impervious surfaces, and represents a considerable improvement over OLS capabilities.  
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  ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1356  
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Author Tewolde, F.T.; Lu, N.; Shiina, K.; Maruo, T.; Takagaki, M.; Kozai, T.; Yamori, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nighttime Supplemental LED Inter-lighting Improves Growth and Yield of Single-Truss Tomatoes by Enhancing Photosynthesis in Both Winter and Summer Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Frontiers in Plant Science Abbreviated Journal Front Plant Sci  
  Volume 7 Issue Pages 448  
  Keywords Plants; LED; fruit quality; lighting period; photosynthesis; plant factory; single-truss tomato; supplemental lighting; yield  
  Abstract (up) Greenhouses with sophisticated environmental control systems, or so-called plant factories with solar light, enable growers to achieve high yields of produce with desirable qualities. In a greenhouse crop with high planting density, low photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) at the lower leaves tends to limit plant growth, especially in the winter when the solar altitude and PPFD at the canopy are low and day length is shorter than in summer. Therefore, providing supplemental lighting to the lower canopy can increase year-round productivity. However, supplemental lighting can be expensive. In some places, the cost of electricity is lower at night, but the effect of using supplemental light at night has not yet been examined. In this study, we examined the effects of supplemental LED inter-lighting (LED inter-lighting hereafter) during the daytime or nighttime on photosynthesis, growth, and yield of single-truss tomato plants both in winter and summer. We used LED inter-lighting modules with combined red and blue light to illuminate lower leaves right after the first anthesis. The PPFD of this light was 165 mumol m(-2) s(-1) measured at 10 cm from the LED module. LED inter-lighting was provided from 4:00 am to 4:00 pm for the daytime treatments and from 10:00 pm to 10:00 am for the nighttime treatments. Plants exposed only to solar light were used as controls. Daytime LED inter-lighting increased the photosynthetic capacity of middle and lower canopy leaves, which significantly increased yield by 27% in winter; however, photosynthetic capacity and yield were not significantly increased during summer. Nighttime LED inter-lighting increased photosynthetic capacity in both winter and summer, and yield increased by 24% in winter and 12% in summer. In addition, nighttime LED inter-lighting in winter significantly increased the total soluble solids and ascorbic acid content of the tomato fruits, by 20 and 25%, respectively. Use of nighttime LED inter-lighting was also more cost-effective than daytime inter-lighting. Thus, nighttime LED inter-lighting can effectively improve tomato plant growth and yield with lower energy cost compared with daytime both in summer and winter.  
  Address Center for Environment, Health and Field Sciences, Chiba University, Kashiwa, Japan; Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, The University of Tokyo, Japan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Frontiers Media S.A. Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1664-462X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27092163; PMCID:PMC4823311 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1434  
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Author Horrace, W.C.; Rohlin, S.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title How Dark Is Dark? Bright Lights, Big City, Racial Profiling Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Review of Economics and Statistics Abbreviated Journal Review of Economics and Statistics  
  Volume 98 Issue 2 Pages 226-232  
  Keywords Psychology; Public Safety; Society  
  Abstract (up) Grogger and Ridgeway (2006) use the daylight saving time shift to develop a police racial profiling test that is based on differences in driver race visibility and (hence) the race distribution of traffic stops across daylight and darkness. However, urban environments may be well lit at night, eroding the power of their test. We refine their test using streetlight location data in Syracuse, New York, and the results change in the direction of finding profiling of black drivers. Our preferred specification suggests that the odds of a black driver being stopped (relative to nonblack drivers) increase 15% in daylight compared to darkness.  
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  ISSN 0034-6535 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2167  
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Author Aulsebrook, A.E.; Jones, T.M.; Rattenborg, N.C.; Roth, T.C. 2nd; Lesku, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sleep Ecophysiology: Integrating Neuroscience and Ecology Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Trends in Ecology & Evolution Abbreviated Journal Trends Ecol Evol  
  Volume 31 Issue 8 Pages 590-599  
  Keywords Commentary; Physiology  
  Abstract (up) Here, we propose an original approach to explain one of the great unresolved questions in animal biology: what is the function of sleep? Existing ecological and neurological approaches to this question have become roadblocks to an answer. Ecologists typically treat sleep as a simple behavior, instead of a heterogeneous neurophysiological state, while neuroscientists generally fail to appreciate the critical insights offered by the consideration of ecology and evolutionary history. Redressing these shortfalls requires cross-disciplinary integration. By bringing together aspects of behavioral ecology, evolution, and conservation with neurophysiology, we can achieve a more comprehensive understanding of sleep, including its implications for adaptive waking behavior and fitness.  
  Address La Trobe University, School of Life Sciences, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Electronic address: j.lesku@latrobe.edu.au  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0169-5347 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27262386 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1462  
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Author Netzel, H.; Netzel, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title High resolution map of light pollution over Poland Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer  
  Volume 181 Issue in press Pages 67-73  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract (up) In 1976 Berry introduced a simple mathematical equation to calculate artificial night sky brightness at zenith. In the original model cities, considered as points with given population, are only sources of light emission. In contrary to Berry׳s model, we assumed that all terrain surface can be a source of light. Emission of light depends on percent of built up area in a given cell. We based on Berry׳s model. Using field measurements and high-resolution data we obtained the map of night sky brightness over Poland in 100-m resolution. High resolution input data, combined with a very simple model, makes it possible to obtain detailed structures of the night sky brightness without complicating the calculations.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1402  
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