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Author Delhey, K.; Peters, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Implications for conservation of anthropogenic impacts on visual communication and camouflage Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Conservation Biology : the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology Abbreviated Journal Conserv Biol  
  Volume 31 Issue 1 Pages 30-39  
  Keywords Conservation  
  Abstract Anthropogenic environmental impacts can disrupt the sensory environment of animals and affect important processes from mate choice to predator avoidance. Currently these effects are best understood for auditory and chemo-sensory modalities and recent reviews highlight their importance for conservation. Here we summarise how anthropogenic changes to the visual environment (ambient light, transmission, backgrounds) affect visual communication and camouflage, and highlight implications for conservation. These implications are particularly evident for disrupted camouflage due to its tight links with survival while the conservation importance of impaired visual communication is less well-documented. Such effects can be potentially severe when they affect critical processes such as pollination or species recognition. However, when impaired mate choice does not lead to hybridization, the conservation consequences are less clear. We suggest that the demographic effects of human impacts on visual communication and camouflage will be particularly strong when: (a) human-induced modifications to the visual environment are evolutionary novel, that is, very different from natural variation, (b) affected species and populations have low levels of intraspecific (genotypic and phenotypic) variation and low levels of behavioural, sensory or physiological plasticity and (c) the processes affected are directly related to survival (camouflage), species recognition, or number of offspring produced, rather than offspring quality or attractiveness. The evidence summarized here suggests that anthropogenic effects on the visual environment might be of similar conservation concerns as those on other sensory modalities. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address (up) 25 Rainforest Walk, School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, 3800, Clayton, Victoria, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0888-8892 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27604521 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1525  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Barentine, J.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Going for the Gold : Quantifying and Ranking Visual Night Sky Quality in International Dark Sky Places Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication International Journal of Sustainable Lighting Abbreviated Journal IJSL  
  Volume 18 Issue Pages 9-15  
  Keywords Society; conservation; dark sky places; dark sky; National parks; dark sky parks; national parks; Luminescent Measurements; Night sky brightness  
  Abstract Since the invention of electric lighting in the nineteenth century, the steadily increasing use of artificial light at night in outdoor spaces has grown to threaten the integrity of dark night skies and nocturnal terrestrial spaces. The conservation community has gradually come to accept the need to protect natural nighttime darkness, which finds expression in dark sky parks and similar protected areas. As these places begin to reap tangible economic benefits in the form of sustainable ‘astrotourism,’ the movement to actively protect them gains strength. The International Dark-Sky Association designates Dark Sky Parks and Reserves under a comparative ranking scheme that assigns night sky quality tiers according to a combination of objective and subjective characteristics, but shortcomings in the consistency of these ratings exist that undermine the consistency and reputation of the designation program. Here we consider potential changes to the qualification regime to make the ratings system more robust for the benefit of future designations.  
  Address (up) 3323 N 1st Ave, Tucson, AZ, 85719 USA; john(at)darksky.org  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher International Journal of Sustainable Lighting Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2586-1247 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1779  
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Author Higuchi, S.; Lee, S.-I.; Kozaki, T.; Harada, T.; Tanaka, I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Late circadian phase in adults and children is correlated with use of high color temperature light at home at night Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 33 Issue 4 Pages 448-452  
  Keywords Children; circadian rhythm; light; melatonin  
  Abstract Light is the strongest synchronizer of human circadian rhythms, and exposure to residential light at night reportedly causes a delay of circadian rhythms. The present study was conducted to investigate the association between color temperature of light at home and circadian phase of salivary melatonin in adults and children. Twenty healthy children (mean age: 9.7 year) and 17 of their parents (mean age: 41.9 years) participated in the experiment. Circadian phase assessments were made with dim light melatonin onset (DLMO). There were large individual variations in DLMO both in adults and children. The average DLMO in adults and in children were 21:50 +/- 1:12 and 20:55 +/- 0:44, respectively. The average illuminance and color temperature of light at eye level were 139.6 +/- 82.7 lx and 3862.0 +/- 965.6 K, respectively. There were significant correlations between color temperature of light and DLMO in adults (r = 0.735, p < 0.01) and children (r = 0.479, p < 0.05), although no significant correlations were found between illuminance level and DLMO. The results suggest that high color temperature light at home might be a cause of the delay of circadian phase in adults and children.  
  Address (up) a Department of Human Science, Faculty of Design , Kyushu University , Fukuoka , Japan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27010525 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1404  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rybnikova, N.A.; Haim, A.; Portnova, B.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Is Prostate Cancer Incidence Worldwide Linked to Artificial Light at Night Exposures? Earlier Findings' Revisit and Current Trends' Analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Archives of Environmental & Occupational Health Abbreviated Journal Arch Environ Occup Health  
  Volume 72 Issue 2 Pages 111-122  
  Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Widespread use of artificial light at night (ALAN) might contribute to the global burden of hormone-dependent cancers. However, previous attempts to verify this association in population-level studies have been sparse. Using the GLOBOCAN, US-DMSP and World Bank's 2010-2012 databases, we studied the association between ALAN and prostate cancer (PC) incidence in 180 countries worldwide, controlling for several country-level confounders. As our analysis indicates, the PC-ALAN association emerged marginally significant when year-2012 PC age-standardized rate data were compared with ALAN levels (t = 1.886, P<0.1); while this association emerged as more significant (t>2.7; P<0.01) when only 110 countries with well-maintained cancer registries were analyzed. Along with other variables, ALAN explains up to 79% of PC ASRs variability. PC-ALAN association appears to vary regionally, with the greatest deviations in Central Africa, Small Island Developing States, South East Asia and Gulf States.  
  Address (up) a Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, Faculty of Management, University of Haifa, 31805, Carmel, Mt, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1933-8244 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27029744 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1412  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ayaki, M.; Hattori, A.; Maruyama, Y.; Nakano, M.; Yoshimura, M.; Kitazawa, M.; Negishi, K.; Tsubota, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Protective effect of blue-light shield eyewear for adults against light pollution from self-luminous devices used at night Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 33 Issue 1 Pages 134-139  
  Keywords Human health  
  Abstract We investigated sleep quality and melatonin in 12 adults who wore blue-light shield or control eyewear 2 hours before sleep while using a self-luminous portable device, and assessed visual quality for the two eyewear types. Overnight melatonin secretion was significantly higher after using the blue-light shield (P < 0.05) than with the control eyewear. Sleep efficacy and sleep latency were significantly superior for wearers of the blue-light shield (P < 0.05 for both), and this group reported greater sleepiness during portable device use compared to those using the control eyewear. Participants rated the blue-light shield as providing acceptable visual quality.  
  Address (up) a Department of Ophthalmology , Keio University School of Medicine , Shinjuku , Tokyo , Japan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:26730983 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1330  
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