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Author (up) Datta, S.; Samanta, D.; Sinha, P.; Chakrabarti, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Gender features and estrous cycle variations of nocturnal behavior of mice after a single exposure to light at night Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Physiology & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Physiol Behav  
  Volume 164 Issue Pt A Pages 113-122  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Light at night alters behavior and cognitive performances in rodents, the variations of which in gender and stages of reproductive cycle in females are elusive. Young mice habituated in light:dark (12:12h) cycle were given a single exposure of light (100lx) at early night for one hour duration followed by experimentations in open field (closed wall with circular big arena), elevated plus maze and square habituated field for memory performance using novel object recognition task. Light effects were compared with results found during without light conditions. Proestrous females appeared to have greater locomotor activity, less anxiety and better memory performance compared to the diestrous females at night without light exposure. The status of locomotor activity, anxiety and memory performance of male mice at night without light exposure appeared to be comparable to females where the stage of estrous cycle is important to characterize the nocturnal behavior of male mice. Light maximally affected proestrous females with decrease in locomotor activity, increase in anxiety and failure of memory performance. Male and diestrous female mice performed memory performance without alteration of locomotor activity and anxiety after exposure to light where males performed better memory performance with greater locomotor activity and more anxiety compared to that of diestrous females. The present study characterizes the mice nocturnal behavior with and without a single exposure to light stimuli with its gender features and estrous cycle variation. In addition, the study indicates an association of memory performance with locomotor activity and anxiety in mice nocturnal behavior.  
  Address Department of Physiology, University of Calcutta, Kolkata, West Bengal, India. Electronic address: ncphysiolcu@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0031-9384 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27241632 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1521  
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Author (up) de Jong, M.; Ouyang, J.Q.; van Grunsven, R.H.A.; Visser, M.E.; Spoelstra, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Do Wild Great Tits Avoid Exposure to Light at Night? Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 11 Issue 6 Pages e0157357  
  Keywords birds; animals; behaviour  
  Abstract Studies of wild populations have provided important insights into the effects of artificial light at night on organisms, populations and ecosystems. However, in most studies the exact amount of light at night individuals are exposed to remains unknown. Individuals can potentially control their nighttime light exposure by seeking dark spots within illuminated areas. This uncertainty makes it difficult to attribute effects to a direct effect of light at night, or to indirect effects, e.g., via an effect of light at night on food availability. In this study, we aim to quantify the nocturnal light exposure of wild birds in a previously dark forest-edge habitat, experimentally illuminated with three different colors of street lighting, in comparison to a dark control. During two consecutive breeding seasons, we deployed male great tits (Parus major) with a light logger measuring light intensity every five minutes over a 24h period. We found that three males from pairs breeding in brightly illuminated nest boxes close to green and red lamp posts, were not exposed to more artificial light at night than males from pairs breeding further away. This suggests, based on our limited sample size, that these males could have been avoiding light at night by choosing a roosting place with a reduced light intensity. Therefore, effects of light at night previously reported for this species in our experimental set-up might be indirect. In contrast to urban areas where light is omnipresent, bird species in non-urban areas may evade exposure to nocturnal artificial light, thereby avoiding direct consequences of light at night.  
  Address Department of Animal Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Wageningen, The Netherlands  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27355354; PMCID:PMC4927185 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1664  
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Author (up) Degen, T.; Mitesser, O.; Perkin, E.K.; Weiss, N.-S.; Oehlert, M.; Mattig, E.; Hölker, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Street lighting: sex-independent impacts on moth movement Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication The Journal of Animal Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Anim Ecol  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Biology  
  Abstract 1.Artificial lights have become an integral and welcome part of our urban and peri-urban environments. However, recent research has highlighted the potentially negative ecological consequences of ubiquitous artificial light. In particular, insects, especially moths, are expected to be negatively impacted by the presence of artificial lights. Previous research with light traps has shown a male-biased attraction to light in moths. 2.In this study, we sought to determine if street lights could limit moth dispersal and if there was any sex bias in attraction to light. More specifically, we aimed to determine sex specific attraction radii for moths to street lights. 3.We tested these hypotheses by collecting moths for two years at an experimental setup. To estimate the attraction radii we developed a Markov model and related it to the acquired data. 4.Utilizing multinomial statistics, we found that attraction rates to lights in the middle of the matrix were substantially lower than predicted by the null hypothesis of equal attraction level (0.44 times). With the Markov model, we estimated that a corner-light was 2.77 times more attractive than a wing-light with an equivalent attraction radius of c. 23m around each light. We found neither sexual differences in the attraction rate nor in the attraction radius of males and females. Since we captured three times more males than females, we conclude that sex ratios are representative of operational sex ratios or of different flight activities. 5.These results provide evidence for street lights to limit moth dispersal, and that they seem to act equally on male and female moths. Consequently, public lighting might divide a suitable landscape into many small habitats. Therefore, it is reasonable to assume i) that public lighting near hedges and bushes or field margins reduces the quality of these important habitat structures, and ii) that public lighting near important habitat structures but not interfering with local movement may affect moth movement between patches. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Berlin, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0021-8790 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27146262 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1439  
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Author (up) Delhey, K.; Peters, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Implications for conservation of anthropogenic impacts on visual communication and camouflage Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Conservation Biology : the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology Abbreviated Journal Conserv Biol  
  Volume 31 Issue 1 Pages 30-39  
  Keywords Conservation  
  Abstract Anthropogenic environmental impacts can disrupt the sensory environment of animals and affect important processes from mate choice to predator avoidance. Currently these effects are best understood for auditory and chemo-sensory modalities and recent reviews highlight their importance for conservation. Here we summarise how anthropogenic changes to the visual environment (ambient light, transmission, backgrounds) affect visual communication and camouflage, and highlight implications for conservation. These implications are particularly evident for disrupted camouflage due to its tight links with survival while the conservation importance of impaired visual communication is less well-documented. Such effects can be potentially severe when they affect critical processes such as pollination or species recognition. However, when impaired mate choice does not lead to hybridization, the conservation consequences are less clear. We suggest that the demographic effects of human impacts on visual communication and camouflage will be particularly strong when: (a) human-induced modifications to the visual environment are evolutionary novel, that is, very different from natural variation, (b) affected species and populations have low levels of intraspecific (genotypic and phenotypic) variation and low levels of behavioural, sensory or physiological plasticity and (c) the processes affected are directly related to survival (camouflage), species recognition, or number of offspring produced, rather than offspring quality or attractiveness. The evidence summarized here suggests that anthropogenic effects on the visual environment might be of similar conservation concerns as those on other sensory modalities. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address 25 Rainforest Walk, School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, 3800, Clayton, Victoria, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0888-8892 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27604521 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1525  
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Author (up) Dobler, G.; Ghandehari, M.; Koonin, S.E.; Sharma, M.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Hyperspectral Survey of New York City Lighting Technology Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Sensors (Basel, Switzerland) Abbreviated Journal Sensors (Basel)  
  Volume 16 Issue 12 Pages 2047  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Instrumentation; Lighting  
  Abstract Using side-facing observations of the New York City (NYC) skyline, we identify lighting technologies via spectral signatures measured with Visible and Near Infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral imaging. The instrument is a scanning, single slit spectrograph with 872 spectral channels from 0.4-1.0 mu m. With a single scan, we are able to clearly match the detected spectral signatures of 13 templates of known lighting types. However, many of the observed lighting spectra do not match those that have been measured in the laboratory. We identify unknown spectra by segmenting our observations and using Template-Activated Partition (TAP) clustering with a variety of underlying unsupervised clustering methods to generate the first empirically-determined spectral catalog of roughly 40 urban lighting types. We show that, given our vantage point, we are able to determine lighting technology use for both interior and exterior lighting. Finally, we find that the total brightness of our scene shows strong peaks at the 570 nm Na – II , 595 nm Na – II and 818 nm Na – I lines that are common in high pressure sodium lamps, which dominate our observations.  
  Address NYU Center for Urban Science and Progress, 1 MetroTech Center, Brooklyn, NY 11201, USA. mohit.sharma@nyu.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1424-8220 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27929391 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1567  
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