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Author Gómez, C.; Mitchell, C.A.
Title Physiological and Productivity Responses of High-wire Tomato as Affected by Supplemental Light Source and Distribution within the Canopy Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science Abbreviated Journal J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci.
Volume 141 Issue 2 Pages 196-208
Keywords Plants; tomato; LED; LED lighting; Solanum lycopersicum; intracanopy lighting; greenhouses; intracanopy supplemental lighting; daily light integral
Abstract The relative coolness-to-touch of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) has enabled commercial implementation of intracanopy lighting (ICL) in the greenhouse. Intracanopy lighting, which refers to the strategy of lighting along the side or from within the foliar canopy, can increase canopy photosynthetic activity, but physiological and productivity responses of high-wire greenhouse tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) to intracanopy supplemental lighting (SL) still are not yet fully understood. Two consecutive production experiments were conducted across seasons in a glass-glazed greenhouse located in a midnorthern, continental climate [lat. 40°N (West Lafayette, IN)]. Plants were grown from winter-to-summer [increasing solar daily light integral (DLI)] and from summer-to-winter (decreasing solar DLI) to compare three SL strategies for high-wire tomato production across changing solar DLIs: top lighting with high-pressure sodium lamps (HPS) vs. intracanopy LED vertical towers vs. hybrid SL (HPS + horizontal ICL-LEDs). A control treatment also was included for which no SL was provided. Supplemental DLI for each experimental period was adjusted monthly, to complement seasonal changes in sunlight, aiming to approach a target total DLI of 25 mol·m‒2·d‒1 during fruit set. Harvest parameters (total fruit fresh weight, number of fruit harvested, and average cluster fresh weight), tissue temperature, chlorophyll fluorescence, and stomatal conductance (gS) were unaffected by SL treatment in both experiments. Among the physiological parameters evaluated, CO2 assimilation measured under light-saturating conditions, light-limited quantum-use efficiency, and maximum gross CO2 assimilation (Amax) proved to be good indicators of how ICL reduces the top-to-bottom decline in leaf photosynthetic activity otherwise measured with top lighting only (HPS-SL or solar). Although SL generally increased fruit yield relative to control, lack of SL treatment differences among harvest parameters indicates that higher crop photosynthetic activity did not increase fruit yield. Compared with control, intracanopy SL increased yield to the same extent as top SL, but the remaining photoassimilate from ICL most likely was partitioned to maintain nonharvested, vegetative plant parts as well.
Address Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Purdue University, 625 Agriculture Mall Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2010
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher American Society for Horticultural Science Place of Publication Editor
Language Engligh Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0003-1062 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) IDA @ john @ Serial 1431
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Author Ceola, S.; Montanari, A.; Parajka, J.; Viglione, A.; Blöschl, G.; Laio, F.
Title Human signatures derived from nighttime lights along the Eastern Alpine river network in Austria and Italy Type Conference Article
Year 2016 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing; Society; nightlights; human presence; river network; Strahler order; DMSP-OLS; OLS; DMSP-OLS; Austria; Italy; Eastern Alpine
Abstract Understanding how human settlements and economic activities are distributed with reference to the geographical location of streams and rivers is of fundamental relevance for several issues, such as flood risk management, drought management related to increased water demands by human population, fluvial ecosystem services, water pollution and water exploitation. Besides the spatial distribution, the evolution in time of the human presence constitutes an additional key question. This work aims at understanding and analysing the spatial and temporal evolution of human settlements and associated economic activity, derived from nighttime lights, in the Eastern Alpine region. Nightlights, available at a fine spatial resolution and for a 22-year period, constitute an

excellent data base, which allows one to explore in details human signatures. In this experiment, nightlights are associated to five distinct distance-from-river classes. Our results clearly point out an overall enhancement of human presence across the considered distance classes during the last 22 years, though presenting some differences among the study regions. In particular, the river network delineation, by considering different groups of river pixels based on the Strahler order, is found to play a central role in the identification of nightlight spatio-temporal trends.
Address Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Chimica, Ambientale e dei Materiali, Università di Bologna, Bologna, Italy
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher International Association of Hydrological Sciences Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference 7th International Water Resources Management Conference of ICWRS, 18–20 May 2016, Bochum, Germany
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) IDA @ john @ Serial 1432
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Author Contel, T.M.; Ferrandis, I.G.; Ferrandis, X.G.
Title Light pollution in natural science textbooks in Spanish secondary education Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication European Journal of Science and Mathematics Education Abbreviated Journal Eur. J. Sci. Math. Ed.
Volume 4 Issue 2 Pages 129-139
Keywords Education; Light pollution, Secondary education, Natural science textbooks, Spanish secondary education curriculum
Abstract Light pollution has emerged with the industrial development in recent decades. It is becoming a significant environmental issue for cities today and it will probably become more important in the near future. However, very little research has been carried out on this issue in the field of science teaching, despite there being a general agreement that education has an important contribution to make in the protection of the environment. This research analyses this problem in secondary education, through the official curriculum and textbooks published for the Valencian Region (Spain).  We have based the research on the “Content analysis” method. Light pollution, despite being included in the Spanish compulsory secondary education curriculum, is an issue that is barely touched on in the majority of the first and second year Natural Science textbooks analysed.
Address Department of Nursing, Research and Health Care Managemen, Ctatholic University of Valencia “San Vicente Martir”, Valencia, Spain; ignacio.garcia‐ferrandis(at)uv.es
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2301-251X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) IDA @ john @ Serial 1433
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Author Tewolde, F.T.; Lu, N.; Shiina, K.; Maruo, T.; Takagaki, M.; Kozai, T.; Yamori, W.
Title Nighttime Supplemental LED Inter-lighting Improves Growth and Yield of Single-Truss Tomatoes by Enhancing Photosynthesis in Both Winter and Summer Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Frontiers in Plant Science Abbreviated Journal Front Plant Sci
Volume 7 Issue Pages 448
Keywords Plants; LED; fruit quality; lighting period; photosynthesis; plant factory; single-truss tomato; supplemental lighting; yield
Abstract Greenhouses with sophisticated environmental control systems, or so-called plant factories with solar light, enable growers to achieve high yields of produce with desirable qualities. In a greenhouse crop with high planting density, low photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) at the lower leaves tends to limit plant growth, especially in the winter when the solar altitude and PPFD at the canopy are low and day length is shorter than in summer. Therefore, providing supplemental lighting to the lower canopy can increase year-round productivity. However, supplemental lighting can be expensive. In some places, the cost of electricity is lower at night, but the effect of using supplemental light at night has not yet been examined. In this study, we examined the effects of supplemental LED inter-lighting (LED inter-lighting hereafter) during the daytime or nighttime on photosynthesis, growth, and yield of single-truss tomato plants both in winter and summer. We used LED inter-lighting modules with combined red and blue light to illuminate lower leaves right after the first anthesis. The PPFD of this light was 165 mumol m(-2) s(-1) measured at 10 cm from the LED module. LED inter-lighting was provided from 4:00 am to 4:00 pm for the daytime treatments and from 10:00 pm to 10:00 am for the nighttime treatments. Plants exposed only to solar light were used as controls. Daytime LED inter-lighting increased the photosynthetic capacity of middle and lower canopy leaves, which significantly increased yield by 27% in winter; however, photosynthetic capacity and yield were not significantly increased during summer. Nighttime LED inter-lighting increased photosynthetic capacity in both winter and summer, and yield increased by 24% in winter and 12% in summer. In addition, nighttime LED inter-lighting in winter significantly increased the total soluble solids and ascorbic acid content of the tomato fruits, by 20 and 25%, respectively. Use of nighttime LED inter-lighting was also more cost-effective than daytime inter-lighting. Thus, nighttime LED inter-lighting can effectively improve tomato plant growth and yield with lower energy cost compared with daytime both in summer and winter.
Address Center for Environment, Health and Field Sciences, Chiba University, Kashiwa, Japan; Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, The University of Tokyo, Japan
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Frontiers Media S.A. Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1664-462X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27092163; PMCID:PMC4823311 Approved no
Call Number (up) IDA @ john @ Serial 1434
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Author Bliss-Ketchum, L.L.; de Rivera, C.E.; Turner, B.C.; Weisbaum, D.M.
Title The effect of artificial light on wildlife use of a passage structure Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation
Volume 199 Issue Pages 25-28
Keywords Animals; animal movement; Columbia black-tailed deer; deer; Odocoileus hemionus columbianus; deer mouse; Peromyscus maniculatus; opossum; Didelphis virginiana; artificial light at night
Abstract Barriers to animal movement can isolate populations, impacting their genetic diversity, susceptibility to disease, and access to resources. Barriers to movement may be caused by artificial light, which is known to disrupt bird, sea turtle, and bat behavior, but few studies have experimentally investigated the effects of artificial light on movement for a suite of terrestrial vertebrates. Therefore, we studied the effect of ecological light pollution on animal usage of a bridge under-road passage structure. On a weekly basis, sections of the structure were subjected to different light treatments including no light added, followed by a Reference period when lights were off in all the structure sections. Sand track data revealed use by 23 mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians, nine of which had > 30 tracks for species-level analysis. Columbia black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) traversed under unlit bridge sections much less when neighboring sections were lit compared to when none were, suggesting avoidance due to any nearby presence of artificial light. Similarly, deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) and opossum (Didelphis virginiana) track paths were less frequent in the lit sections than the ambient. Crossing was correlated with temporal or spatial factors but not light for three of the other species. These findings suggest that artificial light may be reducing habitat connectivity for some species though not providing a strong barrier for others. Such information is needed to inform mitigation of habitat fragmentation in the face of expanding urbanization.
Address Department of Environmental Science & Management, Portland State University, PO Box 751, Portland, OR 97207, USA; blissket(at)pdx.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) IDA @ john @ Serial 1445
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