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Author Xiaolong, G.; Mo, Z.; Xian, L.; Ce, S.; Changbin, S.; Ying, L.
Title Effects of LED light quality on the growth, metabolism, and energy budgets of Haliotis discus discus Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Aquaculture Abbreviated Journal Aquaculture
Volume 453 Issue Pages 31-39
Keywords Animals; Abalone; LED; Metabolism; Energy budgets; Haliotis discus; Haliotis discus discus; Photobiology
Abstract In this study, a bioenergetics approach was used to examine the effects of different LED light qualities (red, orange, blue, green light, natural light and a dark setting) on the growth and survival of the abalone Haliotis discus discus, and its physiological response mechanism under different light qualities. The results suggest that under blue or green light, the survival rate, specific growth rate, food intake, and food conversion efficiency of H. d. discus were significantly lower than in those groups under red or orange light (P < 0.05). Under red or orange light, pepsin, amylase and cellulose activity was significantly higher than those in any other light quality group (P < 0.05), whereas lipase activity exhibited no significant difference among the light quality groups (P > 0.05). Under blue or green light, lactate dehydrogenase activity and lactic acid content were higher (P < 0.05), suggesting enhanced anaerobic metabolism. Under blue or green light, H. d. discus lost more energy via excretion, feces and respiration than was acquired from its food. Under red or orange light, H. d. discus acquired more energy from its food and lost less energy via excretion and feces; as a result, its assimilation efficiency (K1) and net growth efficiency (K2) were significantly higher than those of any other group (P < 0.05). Therefore, we suggest that red or orange light should be used as a light source for the aquaculture of H. d. discus.
Address Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266071, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0044-8486 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) IDA @ john @ Serial 1311
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Author Smolka, J.; Baird, E.; el Jundi, B.; Reber, T.; Byrne, M.J.; Dacke, M.
Title Night sky orientation with diurnal and nocturnal eyes: dim-light adaptations are critical when the moon is out of sight Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Animal Behaviour
Volume 111 Issue Pages 127-146
Keywords Animals; dung beetle; insect; Milky Way; nocturnal adaptation; polarized moonlight; sky compass; straight-line orientation; vision; Scarabaeus; Scarabaeus lamarcki; Scarabaeus satyrus
Abstract The visual systems of many animals feature energetically costly specializations to enable them to function in dim light. It is often unclear, however, how large the behavioural benefit of these specializations is, because a direct comparison in a behaviourally relevant task between closely related day- and night-active species is not usually possible. Here we compared the orientation performance of diurnal and nocturnal species of dung beetles, Scarabaeus (Kheper) lamarcki and Scarabaeus satyrus, respectively, attempting to roll dung balls along straight paths both during the day and at night. Using video tracking, we quantified the straightness of paths and the repeatability of roll bearings as beetles exited a flat arena in their natural habitat or under controlled conditions indoors. Both species oriented equally well when either the moon or an artificial point light source was available, but when the view of the moon was blocked and only wide-field cues such as the lunar polarization pattern or the stars were available for orientation, nocturnal beetles were oriented substantially better. We found no evidence that ball-rolling speed changed with light level, which suggests little or no temporal summation in the visual system. Finally, we found that both diurnal and nocturnal beetles tended to choose bearings that led them towards a bright light source, but away from a dim one. Our results show that even diurnal insects, at least those with superposition eyes, could orient by the light of the moon, but that dim-light adaptations are needed for precise orientation when the moon is not visible.
Address Department of Biology, Lund University, Biology Building, Sölvegatan 35, 223 62 Lund, Sweden; jochen.smolka(at)biol.lu.se
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) IDA @ john @ Serial 1317
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Author Zamorano, J.; Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Ocaña, F.; Pila-Diez, B.; Gómez Castaño, J.; Pascual, S.; Tapia, C.; Gallego, J.; Fernandez, A.; Nievas, M.
Title Testing sky brightness models against radial dependency: a dense two dimensional survey around the city of Madrid, Spain Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal JQSRT
Volume 181 Issue Pages 52-66
Keywords Skyglow; measurements; light pollution; artificial light at night; modeling; Madrid; Spain
Abstract We present a study of the night sky brightness around the extended metropolitan area of Madrid using Sky Quality Meter (SQM) photometers. The map is the first to cover the spatial distribution of the sky brightness in the center of the Iberian peninsula. These surveys are neccessary to test the light pollution models that predict night sky brightness as a function of the location and brightness of the sources of light pollution and the scattering of light in the atmosphere. We describe the data-retrieval methodology, which includes an automated procedure to measure from a moving vehicle in order to speed up the data collection, providing a denser and wider survey than previous works with similar time frames. We compare the night sky brightness map to the nocturnal radiance measured from space by the DMSP satellite. We find that i) a single source model is not enough to explain the radial evolution of the night sky brightness, despite the predominance of Madrid in size and population, and ii) that the orography of the region should be taken into account when deriving geo-specific models from general first-principles models. We show the tight relationship between these two luminance measures. This finding sets up an alternative roadmap to extended studies over the globe that will not require the local deployment of photometers or trained personnel.
Address Dept. Astrof´&#305;sica y CC. de la Atm´osfera, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) IDA @ john @ Serial 1323
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Author Sun, C.; Lian, Z.
Title Sensitive physiological indicators for human visual comfort evaluation Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Res. & Tech.
Volume 48 Issue 6 Pages 726-741
Keywords Human health; human vision; Melatonin
Abstract Three physiological factors (melatonin levels, tear mucus ferning quality and degree of asthenopia) were examined for their relationship to visual comfort. A lighting environment was created where the illuminance, illuminance uniformity and correlated colour temperature could be adjusted. A three-factor and three-level orthogonal experiment with 24 subjects was designed and carried out. The results indicated that the selected environmental factors had different impacts on the physiological factors. With the illuminance increasing, the melatonin level decreased significantly and the tear mucus ferning quality was improved. However, there is no general influence of illuminance uniformity and correlated colour temperature on the physiological parameters, only differential effects among the three levels were found.
Address Zhiwei Lian, Department of Architecture, School of Naval Architecture, Ocean & Civil Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240, PR China; zwlian(at)sjtu.edu.cn
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher SAGE Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) IDA @ john @ Serial 1333
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Author Sliney, D.H.
Title What is light? The visible spectrum and beyond Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Eye (London, England) Abbreviated Journal Eye (Lond)
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health; human vision; spectrum; electromagnetic spectrum; visible; *Ultraviolet Rays; light
Abstract In this International Year of Light, it is particularly appropriate to review the historical concept of what is light and the controversies surrounding the extent of the visible spectrum. Today we recognize that light possesses both a wave and particle nature. It is also clear that the limits of visibility really extend from about 310 nm in the ultraviolet (in youth) to about 1100 nm in the near-infrared, but depend very much on the radiance, that is, 'brightness' of the light source. The spectral content of artificial lighting are undergoing very significant changes in our lifetime, and the full biological implications of the spectral content of newer lighting technologies remain to be fully explored.
Address Department of Environmental Health Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0950-222X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26768917 Approved no
Call Number (up) IDA @ john @ Serial 1337
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