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Author Honnen, A.-C.; Johnston, P.R.; Monaghan, M.T.
Title Sex-specific gene expression in the mosquito Culex pipiens f. molestus in response to artificial light at night Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication BMC Genomics Abbreviated Journal BMC Genomics
Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 22
Keywords Animals
Abstract BACKGROUND: Artificial light at night (ALAN) is a typical feature of urban areas and most organisms living in urban or suburban habitats are exposed to low levels of ALAN. Light is one of the most important environmental cues that organisms use to regulate their activities. Studies have begun to quantify the influence of ALAN on the behavior and ecology of organisms, but research on the effects at the molecular level remains limited. Mosquitoes in the Culex pipiens complex (Diptera, Culicidae) are widespread and abundant in urban areas where they are potential disease vectors. It is thus of particular interest to understand how ALAN may influence biologically and ecologically relevant traits. RESULTS: We used RNAseq to evaluate the transcriptome response in a Cx. pipiens f. molestus laboratory population that was exposed to near-natural light conditions (light:dark L16:D8 hours, “control”) and ALAN conditions with 3 h of constant low-level light at night (L16 + Llow3:D5 hours, “low-light”). The resulting transcripts were mapped to the reference genome of the closely related Culex quinquefasciatus. Female expression patterns differed significantly between control and treatment conditions at five genes although none showed an absolute fold change greater than two (FC > 2). In contrast, male expression differed at 230 genes (74 with FC > 2). Of these, 216 genes (72 with FC > 2) showed reduced expression in the low-light treatment, most of which were related to gametogenesis, lipid metabolism, and immunity. Of the 14 genes (two with FC > 2) with increased expression, only five had any functional annotation. There was a pronounced sex-bias in gene expression regardless of treatment, with 11,660 genes (51 % of annotated genes; 8694 with FC > 2; 48 % of annotated genes) differentially expressed between males and females, including 14 genes of the circadian clock. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest a stronger response to artificial light by males of Cx. pipiens f. molestus than by females, and that a wide range of physiological pathways may be affected by ALAN at the molecular level. The fact that differences in gene expression appear to be sex-specific may have a strong influence at the population level.
Address Berlin Center for Genomics in Biodiversity Research, Konigin-Luise-Strasse 6-8, 14195, Berlin, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1471-2164 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference (down)
Notes PMID:26728786; PMCID:PMC4700752 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1332
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Author Sun, C.; Lian, Z.
Title Sensitive physiological indicators for human visual comfort evaluation Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Res. & Tech.
Volume 48 Issue 6 Pages 726-741
Keywords Human health; human vision; Melatonin
Abstract Three physiological factors (melatonin levels, tear mucus ferning quality and degree of asthenopia) were examined for their relationship to visual comfort. A lighting environment was created where the illuminance, illuminance uniformity and correlated colour temperature could be adjusted. A three-factor and three-level orthogonal experiment with 24 subjects was designed and carried out. The results indicated that the selected environmental factors had different impacts on the physiological factors. With the illuminance increasing, the melatonin level decreased significantly and the tear mucus ferning quality was improved. However, there is no general influence of illuminance uniformity and correlated colour temperature on the physiological parameters, only differential effects among the three levels were found.
Address Zhiwei Lian, Department of Architecture, School of Naval Architecture, Ocean & Civil Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240, PR China; zwlian(at)sjtu.edu.cn
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher SAGE Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference (down)
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1333
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Author Sliney, D.H.
Title What is light? The visible spectrum and beyond Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Eye (London, England) Abbreviated Journal Eye (Lond)
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health; human vision; spectrum; electromagnetic spectrum; visible; *Ultraviolet Rays; light
Abstract In this International Year of Light, it is particularly appropriate to review the historical concept of what is light and the controversies surrounding the extent of the visible spectrum. Today we recognize that light possesses both a wave and particle nature. It is also clear that the limits of visibility really extend from about 310 nm in the ultraviolet (in youth) to about 1100 nm in the near-infrared, but depend very much on the radiance, that is, 'brightness' of the light source. The spectral content of artificial lighting are undergoing very significant changes in our lifetime, and the full biological implications of the spectral content of newer lighting technologies remain to be fully explored.
Address Department of Environmental Health Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0950-222X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference (down)
Notes PMID:26768917 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1337
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Author Yang, Y.-F.; Jiang, J.-S.; Pan, J.-M.; Ying, Y.-B.; Wang, X.-S.; Zhang, M.-L.; Lu, M.-S.; Chen, X.-H.
Title The relationship of spectral sensitivity with growth and reproductive response in avian breeders (Gallus gallus) Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 6 Issue Pages 19291
Keywords Animals; birds; Gallus gallus; spectrum; *Reproduction; photobiology; biology
Abstract A previous study demonstrated that birds that are exposed to light at night develop advanced reproductive systems. However, spectrum might also affect the photoperiodic response of birds. The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of spectral composition on the growth and reproductive physiology of female breeders, using pure light-emitting diode spectra. A total of 1,000 newly hatched female avian breeders (Gallus gallus) were equally allocated to white-, red-, yellow-, green- and blue-light treated groups. We found that blue-light treated birds had a greater and faster weight gain than did red- and yellow-light treated birds (P = 0.02 and 0.05). The red light expedited the sexual maturation of the chicks, whose age at sexual maturity was 7 and 14 days earlier than that of the green- and blue-light treated birds, respectively. The accumulative egg production of the red-light treated birds was 9 and 8 eggs more than that of the blue- and green-light treated birds. The peak lay rate of the red-light treated groups was significantly greater than the blue-light treated birds (P = 0.028). In conclusion, exposure to short-wavelength light appears to promote growth of female breeder birds, whereas exposure to long-wavelength light appears to accelerate reproductive performance.
Address Zhejiang Guangda Breeding Poultry Corporation, Jiaxing 314423, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference (down)
Notes PMID:26765747 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1338
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Author Farnworth, B.; Innes, J.; Waas, J.R.
Title Converting Predation Cues into Conservation Tools: The Effect of Light on Mouse Foraging Behaviour Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages e0145432
Keywords Animals
Abstract Prey face a conflict between acquiring energy and avoiding predators and use both direct and indirect cues to assess predation risk. Illumination, an indirect cue, influences nocturnal rodent foraging behaviour. New Zealand holds no native rodent species but has introduced mice (Mus musculus) that severely impair native biodiversity. We used Giving-Up Densities (GUDs) and observations of foraging frequency and duration to assess if artificial light induces risk avoidance behaviour in mice and could limit their activity. We found both captive (wild strain) mice in outdoor pens and wild mice within a pest fenced sanctuary (Maungatautari, New Zealand) displayed avoidance behaviour in response to illumination. In captivity, total foraging effort was similar across lit and unlit pens but mice displayed a strong preference for removing seeds from dark control areas (mean: 15.33 SD: +/-11.64 per 3.5 hours) over illuminated areas (2.00 +/-3.44). Wild mice also removed fewer seeds from illuminated areas (0.42 +/-1.00 per 12 hours) compared to controls (6.67 +/-9.20). Captive mice spent less than 1.0% of available time at illuminated areas, versus 11.3% at controls; visited the lit areas less than control areas (12.00 +/- 9.77 versus 29.00 +/-21.58 visits respectively); and spent less time per visit at illuminated versus control areas (8.17 +/-7.83 versus 44.83 +/-87.52 seconds per visit respectively). Illumination could provide protection at ecologically sensitive sites, damaged exclusion fences awaiting repair, fence terminus zones of peninsula sanctuaries and shipping docks that service offshore islands. We promote the hypothesis that the tendency of mice to avoid illumination could be a useful conservation tool, and advance knowledge of risk assessment and foraging under perceived danger.
Address University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference (down)
Notes PMID:26760039 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1339
Permanent link to this record