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Author Kotarba, A.Z.; Aleksandrowicz, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Impervious surface detection with nighttime photography from the International Space Station Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment  
  Volume 176 Issue Pages 295-307  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract For over two decades nighttime satellite imagery from the Operational Linescan System (OLS) has been used to detect impervious surfaces. However, OLS-based maps suffer from the sensor's coarse resolution (2.7 km/pixel), overglow, and saturation in urban areas, resulting in inaccurate estimates of the extent and degree of impervious surfaces. In order to provide more reliable estimates of impervious surface extent, we used high resolution (~ 10 m/pixel) nighttime photography from the International Space Station (ISS). Focusing on the city of Berlin in Germany, we produced a map of the extent of impervious surfaces. Our classification was 85% accurate for both user and producer measures. Impervious surfaces omitted by ISS photography were mainly transit roads and airport runways, while green areas and water bodies within the city were falsely identified. An analysis based on ISS imagery classified 55.7% of the study area as impervious, which is only 3.9% less than ground truth (while the OLS-based estimate was 40% higher than ground truth). ISS imagery failed to provide reliable information about the degree of imperviousness for individual pixels (± 20% errors); nevertheless it accurately estimated the spatially-averaged degree of imperviousness for the whole study area (30.2% vs. the reference value of 30.1%). These results show that ISS photography is an important source of nighttime imagery for mapping the extent of impervious surfaces, and represents a considerable improvement over OLS capabilities.  
  Address  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference (down)  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1356  
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Author Kaneshi, Y.; Ohta, H.; Morioka, K.; Hayasaka, I.; Uzuki, Y.; Akimoto, T.; Moriichi, A.; Nakagawa, M.; Oishi, Y.; Wakamatsu, H.; Honma, N.; Suma, H.; Sakashita, R.; Tsujimura, S.-I.; Higuchi, S.; Shimokawara, M.; Cho, K.; Minakami, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Influence of light exposure at nighttime on sleep development and body growth of preterm infants Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 6 Issue Pages 21680  
  Keywords Health  
  Abstract Previous studies have demonstrated that a light-dark cycle has promoted better sleep development and weight gain in preterm infants than constant light or constant darkness. However, it was unknown whether brief light exposure at night for medical treatment and nursing care would compromise the benefits brought about by such a light-dark cycle. To examine such possibility, we developed a special red LED light with a wavelength of >675 nm which preterm infants cannot perceive. Preterm infants born at <36 weeks' gestational age were randomly assigned for periodic exposure to either white or red LED light at night in a light-dark cycle after transfer from the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit to the Growing Care Unit, used for supporting infants as they mature. Activity, nighttime crying and body weight were continuously monitored from enrolment until discharge. No significant difference in rest-activity patterns, nighttime crying, or weight gain was observed between control and experimental groups. The data indicate that nursing care conducted at 3 to 4-hour intervals exposing infants to light for <15 minutes does not prevent the infants from developing circadian rest-activity patterns, or proper body growth as long as the infants are exposed to regular light-dark cycles.  
  Address Department of Obstetrics, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, N15, W7, Kitaku, Sapporo 060-8638, Japan  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference (down)  
  Notes PMID:26877166 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1358  
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Author Katz, Y.; Levin, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Quantifying urban light pollution -- A comparison between field measurements and EROS-B imagery Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment  
  Volume 177 Issue Pages 65-77  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Skyglow  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference (down)  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1359  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dominoni, D.M.; Borniger, J.C.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light at night, clocks and health: from humans to wild organisms Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Biology Letters Abbreviated Journal Biol Lett  
  Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages 20160015  
  Keywords Commentary; Ecology  
  Abstract The increasing use of electric lights has modified the natural light environment dramatically, posing novel challenges to both humans and wildlife. Indeed, several biomedical studies have linked artificial light at night to the disruption of circadian rhythms, with important consequences for human health, such as the increasing occurrence of metabolic syndromes, cancer and reduced immunity. In wild animals, light pollution is associated with changes in circadian behaviour, reproduction and predator-prey interactions, but we know little about the underlying physiological mechanisms and whether wild species suffer the same health problems as humans. In order to fill this gap, we advocate the need for integrating ecological studies in the field, with chronobiological approaches to identify and characterize pathways that may link temporal disruption caused by light at night and potential health and fitness consequences.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1744-9561 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference (down)  
  Notes PMID:26888917 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1360  
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Author Kocifaj, M.; Kómar, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A role of aerosol particles in forming urban skyglow and skyglow from distant cities Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal MNRAS  
  Volume 458 Issue 1 Pages 438-448  
  Keywords Skyglow; scattering; atmospheric effects; artificial light; numerical modeling; GIS-based modeling; light pollution  
  Abstract Aerosol particles may represent the largest uncertainty about skyglow change in many locations under clear sky conditions. This is because aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and influence the ground-reaching radiation in different ways depending on their concentrations, origins, shapes, sizes, and compositions. Large particles tend to scatter in Fraunhofer diffraction regime, while small particles can be treated in terms of Rayleigh formalism. However, the role of particle microphysics in forming the skyglow still remains poorly quantified. We have shown in this paper that the chemistry is somehow important for backscattering from large particles that otherwise work as efficient attenuators of light pollution if composed of absorbing materials. The contribution of large particles to the urban skyglow diminishes as they become more spherical in shape. The intensity of backscattering from non-absorbing particles is more-or-less linearly decreasing function of particle radius even if number size distribution is inversely proportional to the fourth power of particle radius. This is due to single particle backscattering that generally increases steeply as the particle radius approaches large values. Forward scattering depends on the particle shape but is independent of the material composition, thus allowing for a simplistic analytical model of skyglow from distant cities. The model we have developed is based on mean value theorem for integrals and incorporates the parametrizable Garstang's emission pattern, intensity decay along optical beam path, and near-forward scattering in an atmospheric environment. Such model can be used by modellers and experimentalists for rapid estimation of skyglow from distant light sources.  
  Address ICA, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská Road 9, 845 03 Bratislava, Slovak Republic; kocifaj(at)savba.sk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Oxford Journals Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
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  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference (down)  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1361  
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