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Author Stevens, R.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian disruption and health: Shift work as a harbinger of the toll taken by electric lighting Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 33 Issue 6 Pages 589-594  
  Keywords Health  
  Abstract Electric light is one of the signature inventions of human beings. A problem, however, is that electric light can confuse our endogenous circadian rhythmicity. It has now become apparent that circadian biology is fundamental to the functioning and adaptation of almost all life forms. In the modern world, everyone is exposed to electric light during the day and night, and thereby can experience some level of circadian disruption. Perhaps as a canary in the coal mine, study of people whose work hours include nighttime (shift workers) is beginning to yield insights on the adverse health effects of circadian disruption from electric light.  
  Address a UConn Health Center , Farmington , CT , USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor (up)  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27088628 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1444  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bliss-Ketchum, L.L.; de Rivera, C.E.; Turner, B.C.; Weisbaum, D.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effect of artificial light on wildlife use of a passage structure Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation  
  Volume 199 Issue Pages 25-28  
  Keywords Animals; animal movement; Columbia black-tailed deer; deer; Odocoileus hemionus columbianus; deer mouse; Peromyscus maniculatus; opossum; Didelphis virginiana; artificial light at night  
  Abstract Barriers to animal movement can isolate populations, impacting their genetic diversity, susceptibility to disease, and access to resources. Barriers to movement may be caused by artificial light, which is known to disrupt bird, sea turtle, and bat behavior, but few studies have experimentally investigated the effects of artificial light on movement for a suite of terrestrial vertebrates. Therefore, we studied the effect of ecological light pollution on animal usage of a bridge under-road passage structure. On a weekly basis, sections of the structure were subjected to different light treatments including no light added, followed by a Reference period when lights were off in all the structure sections. Sand track data revealed use by 23 mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians, nine of which had > 30 tracks for species-level analysis. Columbia black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) traversed under unlit bridge sections much less when neighboring sections were lit compared to when none were, suggesting avoidance due to any nearby presence of artificial light. Similarly, deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) and opossum (Didelphis virginiana) track paths were less frequent in the lit sections than the ambient. Crossing was correlated with temporal or spatial factors but not light for three of the other species. These findings suggest that artificial light may be reducing habitat connectivity for some species though not providing a strong barrier for others. Such information is needed to inform mitigation of habitat fragmentation in the face of expanding urbanization.  
  Address Department of Environmental Science & Management, Portland State University, PO Box 751, Portland, OR 97207, USA; blissket(at)pdx.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor (up)  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1445  
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Author Qian, J.; Scheer, F.A.J.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian System and Glucose Metabolism: Implications for Physiology and Disease Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism: TEM Abbreviated Journal Trends Endocrinol Metab  
  Volume 27 Issue 5 Pages 282-293  
  Keywords Human Health; circadian rhythms; food timing; glucose metabolism; melatonin; sleep; type 2 diabetes  
  Abstract The circadian system serves one of the most fundamental properties present in nearly all organisms: it generates 24-h rhythms in behavioral and physiological processes and enables anticipating and adapting to daily environmental changes. Recent studies indicate that the circadian system is important in regulating the daily rhythm in glucose metabolism. Disturbance of this circadian control or of its coordination relative to the environmental/behavioral cycle, such as in shift work, eating late, or due to genetic changes, results in disturbed glucose control and increased type 2 diabetes risk. Therefore, an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms underlying glucose regulation by the circadian system and its disturbance may help in the development of therapeutic interventions against the deleterious health consequences of circadian disruption.  
  Address Medical Chronobiology Program, Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA; fscheer(at)bwh.harvard.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Cell Place of Publication Editor (up)  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1043-2760 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27079518; PMCID:PMC4842150 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1446  
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Author Mavraki, N.; Georgiadis, M.; Koutsikopoulos, C.; Tzanatos, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Unravelling the nocturnal appearance of bogue Boops boops shoals in the anthropogenically modified shallow littoral Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of Fish Biology Abbreviated Journal J Fish Biol  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals; artificial habitats; coastal zone; fish behaviour; nocturnal migration; predation avoidance; Boops boops; fish  
  Abstract In the present study the role of the nocturnal migration of bogue Boops boops shoals to anthropogenically modified shallow littoral locations was examined, evaluating four alternative hypotheses: (1) feeding, (2) reproduction, (3) attraction of B. boops to artificial light and (4) concealment in the darkness related to predation avoidance. All hypotheses apart from predation avoidance were rejected, as B. boops tended to concentrate in shaded locations of wider illuminated areas, a finding not only important concerning fish behaviour, but also with significant management implications.  
  Address Section of Animal Biology, Department of Biology, University of Patras, GR 26504 Rio, Patras, Greece; ninon.mavraki(at)gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher FSBI Place of Publication Editor (up)  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-1112 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27094613 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1447  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Park, H.-K.; Gu, J.-H.; Lee, K.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A study on selecting of Light Cutoff Panel depending on the installation condition using the lighting simulation Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society Abbreviated Journal Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society  
  Volume 17 Issue 2 Pages 246-251  
  Keywords Lighting; Light cutoff panel; Light pollution; Light trespass; Relux; Security light  
  Abstract The use of security lighting that emits spill light is considered a cause of light trespass problems in the residential areas. Therefore, a cutoff panel was installed as an alternative way to reduce light trespass. On the other hand, it has another problem in that it is less effective and is not good enough for aesthetics and safety. In this study, a light cutoff panel was designed and manufactured to reduce the light trespass, and the structure of a proper light cutoff panel was studied. Using a goniophotometer, the light distribution file (IES file) was extracted and the characteristics of light distribution were analyzed using the RELUX program. The results showed that the reduction of spilt light in the backward direction was decreased significantly for all types of light cutoff panels except the coated globe. In the case of a black powder coated light cutoff panel, the forward light caused by light reflected from the surface of the light cutoff panel was also reduced, which means that the black powder coated light cutoff panel is effective in the performance of light cutoff in the forward and backward directions. In addition, the coated glove increased the spilt light in the forward and backward directions because it reflects the upward light to go down. A 90 % accuracy between the measurement value of light trespass and the expected value of the light trespass was obtained from a simulation.  
  Address National Institute of Environmental Research; mossad61(at)korea.kr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher KoreaScience Place of Publication Editor (up)  
  Language Korean Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1975-4701 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1448  
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