|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Jiang, J.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, C.; Tian, G.
Title Estimating nitrogen oxides emissions at city scale in China with a nightlight remote sensing model Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication The Science of the Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Sci Total Environ
Volume 544 Issue Pages (down) 1119-1127
Keywords Remote sensing
Abstract Increasing nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions over the fast developing regions have been of great concern due to their critical associations with the aggravated haze and climate change. However, little geographically specific data exists for estimating spatio-temporal trends of NOx emissions. In order to quantify the spatial and temporal variations of NOx emissions, a spatially explicit approach based on the continuous satellite observations of artificial nighttime stable lights (NSLs) from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) was developed to estimate NOx emissions from the largest emission source of fossil fuel combustion. The NSL based model was established with three types of data including satellite data of nighttime stable lights, geographical data of administrative boundaries, and provincial energy consumptions in China, where a significant growth of NOx emission has experienced during three policy stages corresponding to the 9th-11th Five-Year Plan (FYP, 1995-2010). The estimated national NOx emissions increased by 8.2% per year during the study period, and the total annual NOx emissions in China estimated by the NSL-based model were approximately 4.1%-13.8% higher than the previous estimates. The spatio-temporal variations of NOx emissions at city scale were then evaluated by the Moran's I indices. The global Moran's I indices for measuring spatial agglomerations of China's NOx emission increased by 50.7% during 1995-2010. Although the inland cities have shown larger contribution to the emission growth than the more developed coastal cities since 2005, the High-High clusters of NOx emission located in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei regions, the Yangtze River Delta, and the Pearl River Delta should still be the major focus of NOx mitigation. Our results indicate that the readily available DMSP/OLS nighttime stable lights based model could be an easily accessible and effective tool for achieving strategic decision making toward NOx reduction.
Address College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26779958 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1335
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Esaki, Y.; Kitajima, T.; Ito, Y.; Koike, S.; Nakao, Y.; Tsuchiya, A.; Hirose, M.; Iwata, N.
Title Wearing blue light-blocking glasses in the evening advances circadian rhythms in the patients with delayed sleep phase disorder: An open-label trial Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 33 Issue 8 Pages (down) 1037-1044
Keywords Human Health
Abstract It has been recently discovered that blue wavelengths form the portion of the visible electromagnetic spectrum that most potently regulates circadian rhythm. We investigated the effect of blue light-blocking glasses in subjects with delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD). This open-label trial was conducted over 4 consecutive weeks. The DSPD patients were instructed to wear blue light-blocking amber glasses from 21:00 p.m. to bedtime, every evening for 2 weeks. To ascertain the outcome of this intervention, we measured dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) and actigraphic sleep data at baseline and after the treatment. Nine consecutive DSPD patients participated in this study. Most subjects could complete the treatment with the exception of one patient who hoped for changing to drug therapy before the treatment was completed. The patients who used amber lens showed an advance of 78 min in DLMO value, although the change was not statistically significant (p = 0.145). Nevertheless, the sleep onset time measured by actigraph was advanced by 132 min after the treatment (p = 0.034). These data suggest that wearing amber lenses may be an effective and safe intervention for the patients with DSPD. These findings also warrant replication in a larger patient cohort with controlled observations.
Address a Department of Psychiatry , Fujita Health University School of Medicine , Aichi , Japan
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27322730 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1488
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Portnov, B.A.; Stevens, R.G.; Samociuk, H.; Wakefield, D.; Gregorio, D.I.
Title Light at night and breast cancer incidence in Connecticut: An ecological study of age group effects Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication The Science of the Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Sci Total Environ
Volume 572 Issue Pages (down) 1020-1024
Keywords Human Health
Abstract The aim of this study was to test the prediction that within the state of Connecticut, USA, communities with high nighttime outdoor light level would have higher breast cancer incidence rates. Breast cancer cases were identified from the Connecticut Tumor Registry, the oldest within the United States, for years 2005 and 2009 and geocoded to the 829 census tracts in the state. Nighttime light level (LAN) was obtained from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP), 1996/97 satellite image, providing a 10-year lag. Regression models were used incorporating the LAN levels and census level data on potential confounders for the whole female population of the state, and for separate age groups. Light level emerged as a significant predictor of breast cancer incidence. After taking account of several potential confounders, the excess risk in the highest LAN level census tracts compared to the lowest was about 63% (RR=1.63; 95% CI=1.41, 1.89). The association of LAN with breast cancer incidence weakened with age; the association was strongest among premenopausal women.
Address Department of Community Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Connecticut, Farmington, CT 06030, United States. Electronic address: gregorio@uchc.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27531467 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1529
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Quiles, C.L.; de Oliveira, M.A.B.; Tonon, A.C.; Hidalgo, M.P.L.
Title Biological adaptability under seasonal variation of light/dark cycles Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 33 Issue 8 Pages (down) 964-971
Keywords Animals
Abstract 3A substantial amount of experimental models designed to understand rhythms entrainment and the effects of different regimens of light exposure on health have been proposed. However, many of them do not relate to what occurs in real life. Our objective was to evaluate the influence of “seasonal-like” variation in light/dark cycles on biological rhythms. Twenty adult male Wistar rats were assigned to three groups: control (CT), kept in 12:12 light/dark (LD) cycle; long photoperiod/short photoperiod (LP/SP), kept in 16.5:7.5 LD cycle for 18 days (phase A), then 17 days of gradual reductions in light time (phase B), then 18 days of shorter exposure (7.5:16.5 LD cycle, phase C); short photoperiod/long photoperiod (SP/LP) group, with same modifications as the LP/SP group, but in reverse order, starting phase A in 7.5:16.5 LD cycle. Activity and temperature were recorded constantly, and melatonin and cortisol concentrations were measured twice. Activity and temperature acrophases of all groups changed according to light. The correlation between activity and temperature was, overall, significantly lower for SP/LP group compared with LP/SP and CT groups. Regarding melatonin concentration, LP/SP group showed significant positive correlation between phase A and C (p = 0.018). Animals changed temperature and activity according to photoperiod and demonstrated better adaptability in transitioning from long to short photoperiod. Since this model imitates seasonal variation in light in a species that is largely used in behavioral experiments, it reveals promising methods to improve the reliability of experimental models and of further environmental health research.
Address b Pos-graduacao em Psiquiatria e Ciencias do Comportamento, Faculdade de Medicina (FAMED) , Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS) , Porto Alegre , Brasil
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27222076 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1512
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Koo, Y.S.; Jung, K.-Y.
Title Oldies but goodies: The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) data can be used with the data obtained before the year 2012 Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 33 Issue 8 Pages (down) 946-948
Keywords Commentary; Human Health
Abstract
Address b Department of Neurology , Seoul National University College of Medicine , Seoul , South Korea
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27253844 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1463
Permanent link to this record