toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Matsuda, R.; Yamano, T.; Murakami, K.; Fujiwara, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of spectral distribution and photosynthetic photon flux density for overnight LED light irradiation on tomato seedling growth and leaf injury Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Scientia Horticulturae Abbreviated Journal Scientia Horticulturae  
  Volume 198 Issue Pages (down) 363-369  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0304-4238 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1387  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kim, Y.J.; Park, M.S.; Lee, E.; Choi, J.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title High Incidence of Breast Cancer in Light-Polluted Areas with Spatial Effects in Korea Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Asian Pacific Journal for Cancer Prevention Abbreviated Journal Asian Pac J Cancer Prev  
  Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages (down) 361-367  
  Keywords Human Health; Light pollution; breast cancer; spatial analysis; intrinsic conditional autoregressive model  
  Abstract We have reported a high prevalence of breast cancer in light-polluted areas in Korea. However, it is necessary to analyze the spatial effects of light polluted areas on breast cancer because light pollution levels are correlated with region proximity to central urbanized areas in studied cities. In this study, we applied a spatial regression method (an intrinsic conditional autoregressive [iCAR] model) to analyze the relationship between the incidence of breast cancer and artificial light at night (ALAN) levels in 25 regions including central city, urbanized, and rural areas. By Poisson regression analysis, there was a significant correlation between ALAN, alcohol consumption rates, and the incidence of breast cancer. We also found significant spatial effects between ALAN and the incidence of breast cancer, with an increase in the deviance information criterion (DIC) from 374.3 to 348.6 and an increase in R² from 0.574 to 0.667. Therefore, spatial analysis (an iCAR model) is more appropriate for assessing ALAN effects on breast cancer. To our knowledge, this study is the first to show spatial effects of light pollution on breast cancer, despite the limitations of an ecological study. We suggest that a decrease in ALAN could reduce breast cancer more than expected because of spatial effects.  
  Address Department of Preventive Medicine, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul, Korea; eunil(at)korea.ac.kr.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Asian Pacific Organization for Cancer Prevention Place of Publication Korea Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1362  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Watson, M.J.; Wilson, D.R.; Mennill, D.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Anthropogenic light is associated with increased vocal activity by nocturnally migrating birds Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication The Condor Abbreviated Journal The Condor  
  Volume 118 Issue 2 Pages (down) 338-344  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Anthropogenic modifications to the natural environment have profound effects on wild animals, through structural changes to natural ecosystems as well as anthropogenic disturbances such as light and noise. For animals that migrate nocturnally, anthropogenic light can interfere with migration routes, flight altitudes, and social activities that accompany migration, such as acoustic communication. We investigated the effect of anthropogenic light on nocturnal migration of birds through the Great Lakes ecosystem. Specifically, we recorded the vocal activity of migrating birds and compared the number of nocturnal flight calls produced above rural areas with ground-level artificial lights compared to nearby areas without lights. We show that more nocturnal flight calls are detected over artificially lit areas. The median number of nocturnal flight calls recorded at sites with artificial lights (31 per night, interquartile range: 15–135) was 3 times higher than at nearby sites without artificial lights (11 per night, interquartile range: 4–39). By contrast, the number of species detected at lit and unlit sites did not differ significantly (artificially lit sites: 6.5 per night, interquartile range: 5.0–8.8; unlit sites: 4.5 per night, interquartile range: 2.0–7.0). We conclude that artificial lighting changes the behavior of nocturnally migrating birds. The increased detections could be a result of ground-level light sources altering bird behavior during migration. For example, birds might have changed their migratory route to pass over lit areas, flown at lower altitudes over lit areas, increased their calling rate over lit areas, or remained longer over lit areas. Our results for ground-level lights correspond to previous findings demonstrating that migratory birds are influenced by lights on tall structures.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0010-5422 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1422  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cheng, Y.; Zhao, L.; Wan, W.; Li, L.; Yu, T.; Gu, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Extracting urban areas in China using DMSP/OLS nighttime light data integrated with biophysical composition information Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of Geographical Sciences Abbreviated Journal J. Geogr. Sci.  
  Volume 26 Issue 3 Pages (down) 325-338  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1009-637X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1380  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Erren, T.C.; Morfeld, P.; Foster, R.G.; Reiter, R.J.; Gross, J.V.; Westermann, I.K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sleep and cancer: Synthesis of experimental data and meta-analyses of cancer incidence among some 1 500 000 study individuals in 13 countries Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 33 Issue 4 Pages (down) 325-350  
  Keywords Human Health; Cancer; chronodisruption; meta-analyses; napping; sleep and circadian rhythm disruption (SCRD); sleep duration; sleep quality; sleep timing; Circadian Rhythm; sleep; Oncogenesis  
  Abstract Sleep and its impact on physiology and pathophysiology are researched at an accelerating pace and from many different angles. Experiments provide evidence for chronobiologically plausible links between chronodisruption and sleep and circadian rhythm disruption (SCRD), on the one hand, and the development of cancer, on the other. Epidemiological evidence from cancer incidence among some 1 500 000 study individuals in 13 countries regarding associations with sleep duration, napping or “poor sleep” is variable and inconclusive. Combined adjusted relative risks (meta-RRs) for female breast cancer, based on heterogeneous data, were 1.01 (95% CI: 0.97-1.06). Meta-RRs for cancers of the colorectum and of the lung in women and men and for prostate cancer were 1.08 (95% CI: 1.03-1.13), 1.11 (95% CI: 1.00-1.22) and 1.05 (95% CI: 0.83-1.33), respectively. The significantly increased meta-RRs for colorectal cancer, based on homogeneous data, warrant targeted study. However, the paramount epidemiological problem inhibiting valid conclusions about the associations between sleep and cancer is the probable misclassification of the exposures to facets of sleep over time. Regarding the inevitable conclusion that more research is needed to answer How are sleep and cancer linked in humans? we offer eight sets of recommendations for future studies which must take note of the complexity of multidirectional relationships.  
  Address a Institute and Policlinic for Occupational Medicine, Environmental Medicine and Prevention Research , University of Cologne , Cologne , Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27003385 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1407  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: